Jump to content
BANGKOK 18 June 2019 16:19
rooster59

Trump says considering pardons for some U.S. soldiers accused of war crimes

Recommended Posts

Off topic posts and replies have been removed.

 

A post containing a blog site video has been removed as an unapproved source. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trump want Assange who expose horrible war crimes arrested on espionage charges (did not know that exposing to all the people war crimes was espionage) and of course those who killed innocents child, raped women, gunned down innocents civilians just for fun , pardoned as they served the nation in committing war crimes !

  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, OneMoreFarang said:

It's obvious that in hectic war situations people have to make ad-hoc life and death decisions. And sometimes they decide to do something that in the hindsight maybe they should not have done. I think nobody can blame soldiers to make sometimes the "wrong" decisions under pressure.

But then there are some so called soldiers who deliberately torture or maim or kill innocent people who are no risk to them or their fellow soldiers. They shouldn't do that and they should be punished if they do it. 

Some soldiers of ISIS considered crucifixion ok.  Culturally appropriate guess.  Impaling is all good then? 

I subscribe to all is fair in love and war 

Let the guys free 

  • Like 1
  • Confused 2
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

On a general thought,  if there are rules of engagement, specific laws and the Geneva Convention that regulate and reprimand war crimes.........to pardon illicit actions in the field, should not be encouraged in any law abiding nation. 

 

No matter which war or which country, war is something that is never easy, clean, fair or just ... war is plainly the ultima ratio that needs to be conducted and played by the rules of engagement. If not, we are as bad as the horrible guys on the other side, against whom we are fighting.

Edited by observer90210
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, ezzra said:

Mr. Trump consider pardoning  Jonathan Pollard who's done his 30 years for espionage and now he's prevented from leaving the US to go and spend the rest of his life in true home Israel... 

“Espionage” can be called an act done for one's own country whereas “treason” is an act that is done against one's own country.

A US Citizen from birth in 1954

Pollards' sentencing took place on March 4, 1987

Pollard applied for Israeli citizenship in 1995

 

Let him rot in prison

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Donald looked into the crimes at all he would stay silent I think it’s more on the order of sucking up to his base than any thought of righting a wrong

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A troll post using a trolling representation of Trump's name has been removed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, rott said:

difficult to picture what went on as in most of Vietnam

 

Not a thought that occurs to the president though.

 

He was enjoying the high-life in college, playing physically-demanding sports all with a debilitating medical condition.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, mania said:

“Espionage” can be called an act done for one's own country whereas “treason” is an act that is done against one's own country.

A US Citizen from birth in 1954

Pollards' sentencing took place on March 4, 1987

Pollard applied for Israeli citizenship in 1995

 

Let him rot in prison

 

Out on parole (under restrictive terms) since 2015.

Attempts to secure a waiver for parole terms or get more lenient ones were rejected as well.

Wasn't and shouldn't have been pardoned.

 

With regard to the OP - not all cases cited are similar, a couple maybe more fitting, but most aren't. Either way, the timing is horrible and obviously political. Veteran's day? Perhaps. Probably better not to tie things like that with any such dates.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Morch said:

 

Out on parole (under restrictive terms) since 2015.

Attempts to secure a waiver for parole terms or get more lenient ones were rejected as well.

Wasn't and shouldn't have been pardoned.

 

With regard to the OP - not all cases cited are similar, a couple maybe more fitting, but most aren't. Either way, the timing is horrible and obviously political. Veteran's day? Perhaps. Probably better not to tie things like that with any such dates.

The individual cases are of course all different, some may warrant a pardon some definitely do not.

 

The Navy SEAL here was reported by his own team for randomly killing civilians and randomly staffing homesteads.

 

The soldiers who desecrated the bodies of killed insurgents videoed their crime and that video became recruitment material for the insurgents.

 

After his release one convicted war criminal played a pivotal role in helping police stop a contract killing.

 

The military contractor who murdered Iraqi civilians was not in the US military and ought to have been left to the Iraqi courts.

 

All of these war crimes provided propaganda fodder for the insurgents who made use of these crimes to recruit support to killing more American service personnel.

 

Suggesting pardoning these people on Memorial Day, when we remember the dead, is obscene.

 

Google ‘Let’s talk about Pardoning war criminals’ for some interesting insights.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, ezzra said:

Mr. Trump consider pardoning  Jonathan Pollard who's done his 30 years for espionage and now he's prevented from leaving the US to go and spend the rest of his life in true home Israel... 

Pollard, who was spying for our "ally" Israel is lucky to be out of prison having served only 30 years despite political pressure from Israel and the US Jewish community to have him released.  He remained in prison due to the efforts of the intelligence community who were the only ones to know the full extent of the damage he had done to US national security.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...