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Ideas in place to reverse decline in Thai education


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Ideas in place to reverse decline in Thai education

By CHULARAT SAENGPASSA 
THE NATION

 

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THE decades-long downward trend in the quality of Thai education can be reversed if key proposals set out over the past two years are embraced, members of the Independent Committee for Education Reform (ICER) believe.

 

“We have already delivered tangible guidelines for the education sector,” ICER president Professor Charas Suwanwela said ahead of his committee’s two-year tenure ending on May 31. The panel has suggested legislation including a National Education Bill, Equitable Education Fund Act and Early Childhood Act. 

 

“We have also identified areas for educational innovation,” Charas said. 

 

ICER was established two years ago to lead education reform efforts. It’s widely accepted that reform is badly needed in Thai schooling. The quality of education has shown little improvement despite more resources and bigger budgets been allocated.

 

“Over the past few decades many countries have surpassed Thailand in terms of education quality. This trend is unacceptable,” Charas said. 

 

He hopes the committee’s guidelines for reform will improve the sector in the next four or five years. 

 

Charas, preparing to pass on the torch later this week, emphasised that the new government will have to pay attention to problems in education and actively pursue solutions. 

 

“Rote learning prevails in the schools,” he said, and it’s resulted in Thai youngsters scoring below average in tests conducted as part of the Programme for International Student Assessment and the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. 

 

Charas pointed out that graduates of Thai vocational schooled were also poorly skilled. “And Thailand’s higher-education institutes can’t compete at the international level either.”

 

He doesn’t see the greater resources devoted to education translating into better quality, and blames the failure of erroneous attitudes and perspectives. 

“Too many Thais still still believe college degrees are more important than individual competency,” he said. “Society also tends to think its the state’s duty alone to provide quality education, while in reality everybody should be contributing.” 

 

Dr Jiruth Sriratanaban, who chairs an ad-hoc ICER committee that formulated the National Education Bill, said ICER aimed to reduce inequality in education and boost competitiveness.

 

“The Equitable Education Fund has already started delivering support to children in need,” he said. 

 

The fund’s administrators have been working closely with the Office of Basic Education Commission since late last year to provide additional financing to students who might have to drop out of school because their families can’t afford it.

 

Jiruth said the Early Childhood Act promised to ensure that relevant ministries integrate their efforts to provide good care to children from a young age. 

 

“I believe tangible results will become visible soon,” he said, adding that ICER had conceived many good initiatives but was unable to complete them before its tenure elapsed. 

 

“So we hope relevant parties will support these initiatives in the future,” he said. 

 

Jiruth said citizens in general could contribute to school reform by closely monitoring the state agencies and organisations involved in the process.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30370016

 

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11 minutes ago, webfact said:

that the new government will have to pay attention to problems in education and actively pursue solutions.

I don't think they want the people educated, because if they educate them properly, it won't be long before they lose their position of power.

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4 minutes ago, Thaiwrath said:

I don't think they want the people educated, because if they educate them properly, it won't be long before they lose their position of power.

I have heard that argument several times (not just on TV) and it may very well be true.

 

I have also heard about how the administration of the education departments spend too much of the budget on things that really contribute nothing or very little to the students education.  Thailand isn't a rich country and they shouldn't be sending their classes on expensive trips to USA with several adults along for "supervision".  One of my in-laws was a teacher and her class went to Los Angeles including trips to Disneyland, Magic Mountain and Universal Studios.  I can't say for certain how that was funded, but I'm certainly suspicious.

 

One of the largest factors in a child's education is how much the parents are involved in ensuring that the material is learned.  I've seen parents insist that their children spend adequate time at their studies but the parents are not able/willing to be hands on to ensure understanding is achieved.

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The problem here is in secondary high school education really. At present, it's little more than 6 years of brainwashing nonsense which teaches them little and so many high school teachers are sub-par at best with some very strange notions of things as they too are a product of said brainwashing rubbish. I've spoken to a fair few tertiary uni teachers (foreign educated Thais as well as westerners) and many say that they get students that have supposedly been studying, say English, for like 12 years and they can't even answer the most basic questions. Other problem you have is that the teachers and government workers in education are one of the most resistant to change as they are on a good gig as it is now.

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One of our close family friends teaches at the Thai university regarded as the most prestigious. 

 

She told us that one significant problem is that Thai schooling is not to educate but rather to socialize, where Thai kids learn their place in the social order and to make connections to the people among that social order. 

 

I think this is reflected in the Thai priority of social order and cohesion above almost all else. Thailand is effectively a Caste country, like India. 

 

The families who actually want their children educated (and who have the means) send them out of Thailand post haste. 

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The Thai education system is nothing but a farce to pretend it gives students an education. They have no knowledge of the world, history nor ability to think and analyse.

 

The average university graduate wouldnt pass a year 10 exam in a western high school.

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17 minutes ago, Reigntax said:

The Thai education system is nothing but a farce to pretend it gives students an education. They have no knowledge of the world, history nor ability to think and analyse.

 

The average university graduate wouldnt pass a year 10 exam in a western high school.

Thailand is a kinda like one vast Potemkin village.

 

All they have ever learned to do is to inhabit a faked stage set-to nominally adhere to some Western standards-whilst smiling and waving at the bosses as they float by..

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Ideas to reverse the decline !!

First thing is stop all this stupid nonsense of teachers going to useless seminars, when they should be teaching.

Teachers scouring the internet, looking for something to go to so they get a few days away, all expenses paid.... Crazy nonsense.

Stop the corruption of filling teaching posts by who gives the most money under the table.

When you have teachers who know absolutely nothing about anything outside of Thailand, what chance is there for children to learn.

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Words like ''Embrace, tangible guidelines and innovations in Education'' are just western words Thais will never know the meaning of..

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So they've spent years studying the decline in Education standards; they've agreed that new ideas should be introduced but I don't see any of these ideas listed above.

As a teacher of English for 39 years, here's a couple of improvements I'd like to see:

 

despite a huge budget many schools lack basic necessities like Air/con except for the elite classes;

some of this money disappears before it reaches schools because of the layers of bureaucracy in the Civil Service;

many of the schools are run as businesses by Directors and unprincipled Principals - profit is the bottom line not raising standards;

teachers are appointed not on merit but through connections/cash;

nobody fails exams!

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3 hours ago, webfact said:

Over the past few decades many countries have surpassed Thailand in terms of education quality.

There is a local school about two kilometers down the road from from my place. I use to help out but no more. Here is just one reason.

 

A few years back a library/study hall was built by funds raised by an international school in Bangkok. Some of these high school students even traveled to the upcountry school to help with painting as part of a community project. The building turned out great with a hand painted mural covering one wall and long tables for studying. Even had air conditioning. This original concept only last a few months. Then the local school's administration team decided that they needed a new office.

 

Students are no longer allowed inside the building...

 

 

 

 

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