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Skippy is made in China, it could have anything in it, I won't buy it.

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46 minutes ago, mserror said:

Skippy is made in China, it could have anything in it, I won't buy it.

 

Oddly, to my considerable dismay, so are all the Snickers chocolate bars sold in Thailand... Thus, I won't eat them, and buy my own from the U.S.

 

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Couple of things:  1st, the Phillips blender attachment can only be run on "pulse" when making peanut butter.  I have a cheapo chopper we bought some years ago on Lazada for about 300B, but have to run that on pulse also - burnt up the motor twice, and repair guy said "PLEASE only use pulse!"  Don't know if that chopper is still available, but I'll look.  2nd, if you make p'nut butter regularly, shop at Makro where you can buy a pack of 6 500g peeled raw peanuts for between 180 and 210 baht (30-35 baht per 500g). 3rd, as far as roasting:  No use heating up the entire kitchen with the oven for 30 minutes.  Just dump a bag of peanuts into a good-sized stoneware bowl & run them in the microwave for a total of about 9 minutes!  Roast them in approx six 90-second stages, though, removing the bowl from the m'wave and stiring the nuts after each 90 second interval.  Like yourself, I truly dislike Skippy and the vast majority of commercial peanut butters b/c of all the additives.  All I add to mine is a touch of salt - no oil needed for either roasting or grinding.  Hope this helps. 

 

BTW, I brought a machine here from the US when I moved here in '07, called the "Ultimate Chopper," that I'd used both there and here (using a 220-to-110 converter) to do the grinding.  Worked beautifully... that is, until I had an attention lapse and plugged the 110-v machine directly into the 220-v outlet.  Fried the machine instantly, beyond repair by the guys here b/c of unavailable parts.  Also, they no longer make that machine.  Ah, well... too bad.  It worked great.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, BkruaiRetiree said:

BTW, I brought a machine here from the US when I moved here in '07, called the "Ultimate Chopper," that I'd used both there and here (using a 220-to-110 converter) to do the grinding.  Worked beautifully... that is, until I had an attention lapse and plugged the 110-v machine directly into the 220-v outlet.  Fried the machine instantly, beyond repair by the guys here b/c of unavailable parts.  Also, they no longer make that machine.  Ah, well... too bad.  It worked great.

 

My Black & Decker FP from the U.S. has an 800 watt motor, and I've been running that particular unit probably 4-5 years now via a 1000 watt step-down power transformer, and it's been purring along just fine making peanut butter pretty much weekly.

 

I had a similar U.S. FP prior that eventually broke after MANY years of use, but that didn't have anything to do with the motor burning out. Usually when making PB, I run mine maybe 2 minutes on full grind, then stop and let it sit a couple minutes, and then run it again for another minute or two to just finalize the PB.... 

 

But if the Thai Philips model isn't capable of that kind of grinding, I'm glad to hear that to avoid potentially buying one in the future.  The reality is, though, the food processors I buy from Amazon usually run about $30-$40 vs. the typical $100 to $200 prices that a lot of FP run here.

 

Edited by TallGuyJohninBKK

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Thanks for "step-down transformer" (couldn't recall the proper name when replying - I'm 75 & a bit fuzzy around the edges).  That's what I have - 2 of them, a 500-watt & a 1,500-watt to run all the stuff I brought from the States.  The Philips FP I own is actually a glorified blender, and while it has sufficient power and the motor isn't likely to burn out, the bearings in the chopper bowl attachment overheated and became very noisy (and loose, I discovered) when I ran it nonstop for about a minute.  Thus, I reverted to my "cheapo" chopper.  The motor on that chopper didn't burn out - I just said that for the sake of brevity.  Actually, it's the pressure-switch contacts that get toasted by nonstop running.  By following the repair guy's (Amorn) advice, the machine has worked flawlessly for 3 years now... although it's low capacity (about 1 cup) and difficult to clean.

 

Re the Philips FP you linked:  I don't know whether that one will handle making peanut butter or not.  I'm also very leery about where it's made, having been burned several times by substandard China-built machines (including a Cuisinart FP, btw - did get a refund from Central on that one).

 

I really like the B&D FP model you have - but, unfortunately, the shipping cost thru Amazon doubles the price.  Still, it's an option if/when my cheapo chopper bites the dust, so thanks for the info.  Also, try the m'wave roasting technique I mentioned.  Works terrifically & takes much less time... but don't try roasting them for 9 straight minutes (i.e., instead of cooking in 90-second intervals & stirring after each interval) or you'll get uneven results, including a bunch of burnt peanuts.  I know - I did it, but only once.  I'm not THAT fuzzy!

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, BkruaiRetiree said:

Re the Philips FP you linked:  I don't know whether that one will handle making peanut butter or not. 

 

Quote

The Philips FP I own is actually a glorified blender, 

 

So, the Philips device you have at home here is not the same device/model as the Philips FP I linked to above???

 

One difference between a "blender" vs. a "food processor", I'd assume, is the blender is aimed at dealing with liquids and presumably not encountering too much resistance, whereas a food processor hopefully is built to deal with heavier/more solid contents like meat, veggies, etc etc....and capable of encountering more resistance without getting fried....

 

 

Edited by TallGuyJohninBKK

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This is what i use for making almond butter and peanut butter. Works much better as those bladed things. 

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All right, been following this thread since it started a couple of days ago.

 

Never thought there could be so many nuances to making your own peanut butter.

 

Here is what I'd like you all to comment on - what are you eating that you have to make peanut butter by the KG?

 

As a kid I ate plenty of it, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, peanut butter slathered on hot

toast, and my mothers favorite, peanut butted with banana.

 

I will admit I don't know why I abandoned ratting peanut butter, but I have been abroad

for the last 40 years in obscure places where you would not find peanut butter

on the "supermarket shelf".  So, I also get it - you're making something at home that is not

necessarily readily available and you like.

 

But what are you eating?

 

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11 minutes ago, robblok said:

 

This is what i use for making almond butter and peanut butter. Works much better as those bladed things. 

 

The contraption you linked above, according to the video, takes an hour or more....and shows them using/needing a fan to keep the device from overheating.... Not to mention being pretty noisy....

 

My food processor takes 3-4 minutes in total, and doesn't get hot or require any fan..

 

 

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5 minutes ago, expat_4_life said:

All right, been following this thread since it started a couple of days ago.

 

Never thought there could be so many nuances to making your own peanut butter.

 

Here is what I'd like you all to comment on - what are you eating that you have to make peanut butter by the KG?

 

As a kid I ate plenty of it, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, peanut butter slathered on hot

toast, and my mothers favorite, peanut butted with banana.

 

I will admit I don't know why I abandoned ratting peanut butter, but I have been abroad

for the last 40 years in obscure places where you would not find peanut butter

on the "supermarket shelf".  So, I also get it - you're making something at home that is not

necessarily readily available and you like.

 

But what are you eating?

 

 

I don't make PB by 1 kg per time... I use one 500g bag of peeled, home roasted peanuts per time, and that ends up as pretty much a similar amount of peanut butter when done. Needs to be kept in the frig and not kept too long, as there are no preservatives or chemical additives in the homemade stuff... Just 100% roasted peanuts, period.

 

For me, I mainly use the PB for breakfast in the morning as a topping on either toast or toasted English muffins... And at times, at night if I'm feeling like a snack, I'll eat some rice crackers and use them to scoop up a bit of PB to go with each one....

 

I'm also planning to use some of my PB as a flavoring in some homemade frozen LF yogurt I've been making lately at home with a newly acquired Cuisinart electric ice cream maker/mixer... But thus far, I've mostly been using decaf coffee and Hersheys cocoa powder as my main frozen yogurt flavor choices.

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, TallGuyJohninBKK said:

 

I don't make PB by 1 kg per time... I use one 500g bag of peeled, home roasted peanuts per time, and that ends up as pretty much a similar amount of peanut butter when done. Needs to be kept in the frig and not kept too long, as there are no preservatives or chemical additives in the homemade stuff... Just 100% roasted peanuts, period.

 

For me, I mainly use the PB for breakfast in the morning as a topping on either toast or toasted English muffins... And at times, at night if I'm feeling like a snack, I'll eat some rice crackers and use them to scoop up a bit of PB to go with each one....

 

I'm also planning to use some of my PB as a flavoring in some homemade frozen LF yogurt I've been making lately at home with a newly acquired Cuisinart electric ice cream maker/mixer... But thus far, I've mostly been using decaf coffee and Hersheys cocoa powder as my main frozen yogurt flavor choices.

Hey thanks, I wasn't trying to be "cheeky" ... just asking.  Seriously curios about what you folks are making

or eating with the peanut butter.  Anyone have some favorite recipes?

Edited by expat_4_life

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5 minutes ago, expat_4_life said:

I wasn't trying to be "cheeky" ... just asking.

 

I didn't take your question that way... just a legit question that I tried to answer.  :smile:

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i just use a regular phillips smoothie maker / blender

 

half kg of peanuts, bit of olive oil, sugar, salt

 

once blender is on, use a wooden spoon to move things round a bit until it starts to turn creamy

 

easy, and delicious

 

washing up can be a bit messy mind!

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