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BANGKOK 26 June 2019 00:33
geovalin

New Findings Hint at The True Reasons For The Decline of This Ancient Civilisation

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ALISON KYRA CARTER, THE CONVERSATION
 

It was built in the early 12th century by King Suryavarman II, one of the most famous kings of the Angkorian civilization that lasted from approximately the ninth to 15th centuries. The structure is so strongly associated with Cambodian identity even today that it appears on the nation's flag.

 

For many years, historians placed the collapse of the Angkor civilization in 1431, when Angkor's capital city was sacked by the Thai Kingdom of Ayutthaya and abandoned.

 

The idea that the Angkorian capital was abandoned also played a part in the 19th-century colonial interpretation of Angkor as a civilization forgotten by the Cambodians and left to decay in the jungle.

 

read more https://www.sciencealert.com/archaeologist-find-hints-to-why-ancient-civilisation-at-angkor-wat-cambodia-declined

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Good article.  Similarly, the Peruvians never entirely forgot about Machu Picchu.  They told Hiram Bingham where it was after which he became famous for "discovering" it.

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3 hours ago, VincentRJ said:

"A series of decades-long droughts, interspersed with heavy monsoons, disrupted Angkor's water management network meant to capture and disburse water.

 

One study of the moats around the walled urban precinct of Angkor Thom suggest the city's elite were already departing by 14th century, almost 100 years before the supposed sack of the capital by Ayutthaya."

 

I read about this rapid change in climate many years ago, which was also confirmed by a study of tree rings in the area, by a group of Australian scientists. A rapid cooling in the Himalayas could also have reduced the amount of water flowing down the Mekong, leaving the dams dry and resulting in large numbers of the population abandoning the area.

 

It's interesting to note that these decades-long droughts occurred around the same time that the climate in Europe was changing from the Medieval Warm Period to the Little Ice Age, suggesting that the MWP and the LIA were in fact global events, which Climate Change alarmists seem to deny.

you better send them a letter, hey climate change alarmists, there was an alarming climate change so therefore there cant be alarming climate changes

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7 hours ago, phycokiller said:

you better send them a letter, hey climate change alarmists, there was an alarming climate change so therefore there cant be alarming climate changes

No. The message is, alarming climate change has happened frequently before when CO2 levels were low, so don't fall into the trap of thinking you can stop it happening again by spending trillions of dollars reducing CO2 levels. 

 

Instead, build more dams, long water pipes, and desalination plants, so nobody ends up like the ancient Khmers did, and other ancient civilizations, as a result of natural changes in climate.

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20 hours ago, VincentRJ said:

No. The message is, alarming climate change has happened frequently before when CO2 levels were low, so don't fall into the trap of thinking you can stop it happening again by spending trillions of dollars reducing CO2 levels. 

 

Instead, build more dams, long water pipes, and desalination plants, so nobody ends up like the ancient Khmers did, and other ancient civilizations, as a result of natural changes in climate.

I dont think anyone is claiming co2 is the only cause of climate change

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6 hours ago, phycokiller said:

I dont think anyone is claiming co2 is the only cause of climate change

Of course not. That would be very silly. 😁

 

The message that is being promoted by the politicians and the scientists whose jobs rely upon government funding, is that human caused CO2 emissions are the primary driver of the current warming, and that we can stop the warming, and the predicted increase in the severity of extreme weather events, by halting our emissions of CO2.

 

For some strange reason it is thought that warming is 'bad', yet the ancient Khmer civilization began around the time of the beginning of the Medieval Warm Period in Europe, and flourished during the course of that warm period, just as the Vikings flourished in Greenland.

 

When the climate began changing from warm to cool, during the 14th century, the Vikings deserted Greenland and the Khmers deserted their civilization around Angkor Wat.

 

If it's true that rising CO2 levels are the primary cause of the current warming, which I doubt, as do lots of very qualified scientists whose research is marginalized, then maintaining the current levels of CO2 could protect us from the devastation of the next 'cool' period which, in the past, appears to have at least contributed to the destruction of the Khmer civilization.

 

We might be shooting ourselves in the foot by reducing CO2 levels. We should try harder to learn from history.

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On 6/5/2019 at 3:11 PM, inThailand said:

New Findings Hint at The True Reasons For The Decline of This Ancient Civilisation. 

 

I thought this was about the declining LOS that hasn't made it past the stone age? 

I thought it was about brexit

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4 minutes ago, VincentRJ said:

Of course not. That would be very silly. 😁

 

The message that is being promoted by the politicians and the scientists whose jobs rely upon government funding, is that human caused CO2 emissions are the primary driver of the current warming, and that we can stop the warming, and the predicted increase in the severity of extreme weather events, by halting our emissions of CO2.

 

For some strange reason it is thought that warming is 'bad', yet the ancient Khmer civilization began around the time of the beginning of the Medieval Warm Period in Europe, and flourished during the course of that warm period, just as the Vikings flourished in Greenland.

 

When the climate began changing from warm to cool, during the 14th century, the Vikings deserted Greenland and the Khmers deserted their civilization around Angkor Wat.

 

If it's true that rising CO2 levels are the primary cause of the current warming, which I doubt, as do lots of very qualified scientists whose research is marginalized, then maintaining the current levels of CO2 could protect us from the devastation of the next 'cool' period which, in the past, appears to have at least contributed to the destruction of the Khmer civilization.

 

We might be shooting ourselves in the foot by reducing CO2 levels. We should try harder to learn from history.

Yes, not only CO2 we have methane to worry about now as the permanent frost ground heats up and the oceans warm releasing the far more dangerous methane gas a far bigger greenhouse gas than CO2.

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2 hours ago, soalbundy said:

Yes, not only CO2 we have methane to worry about now as the permanent frost ground heats up and the oceans warm releasing the far more dangerous methane gas a far bigger greenhouse gas than CO2.

Methane might be a more significant greenhouse gas than CO2 per molecule, but the total quantity in the atmosphere is even tinier than the quantity of CO2. Currently there is around 404 'parts per million' of CO2 in the atmosphere. In recent years the amount of Methane has risen from 0.7 ppm to 1.8 ppm. The amounts are so tiny they are usually described in 'parts per billion'.

Ooh! I'm getting really nervous. I'm trembling with anxiety. 😁

 

Water vapor is by far the most significant greenhouse gas, accounting for perhaps as much as 85% of the total greenhouse effect. However, the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere at any particular location and time, varies considerably. It can be as high as 4% (a thousand times greater than the amount of CO2) in hot, humid conditions, and close to zero in the dry deserts. Perhaps on average, it comprises about 2-3% of the lower atmosphere or troposphere.
 

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4 hours ago, VincentRJ said:

Of course not. That would be very silly. 😁

 

The message that is being promoted by the politicians and the scientists whose jobs rely upon government funding, is that human caused CO2 emissions are the primary driver of the current warming, and that we can stop the warming, and the predicted increase in the severity of extreme weather events, by halting our emissions of CO2.

 

For some strange reason it is thought that warming is 'bad', yet the ancient Khmer civilization began around the time of the beginning of the Medieval Warm Period in Europe, and flourished during the course of that warm period, just as the Vikings flourished in Greenland.

 

When the climate began changing from warm to cool, during the 14th century, the Vikings deserted Greenland and the Khmers deserted their civilization around Angkor Wat.

 

If it's true that rising CO2 levels are the primary cause of the current warming, which I doubt, as do lots of very qualified scientists whose research is marginalized, then maintaining the current levels of CO2 could protect us from the devastation of the next 'cool' period which, in the past, appears to have at least contributed to the destruction of the Khmer civilization.

 

We might be shooting ourselves in the foot by reducing CO2 levels. We should try harder to learn from history.

 while I agree that humans likely have accidentally prevented ourselves from going into the next ice age I think scientists probably have a good idea as when we are overdoing it

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5 hours ago, phycokiller said:

 while I agree that humans likely have accidentally prevented ourselves from going into the next ice age I think scientists probably have a good idea as when we are overdoing it

The next 'true' Ice Age might be a long way off. During the last Ice Age, glaciers have advanced and retreated over 20 times, often blanketing North America with ice. Our climate today is actually a warm interval between these many periods of glaciation, known as an interglacials. The most recent period of glaciation, which many people think of as the "Ice Age," was at its height approximately 20,000 years ago. This is more correctly termed the 'Last Glacial Maximum'. The last Ice Age began about 2.6 million years ago.

 

Within these many cycles of 'glacials and interglacials', there are smaller cycles such as the flourishing 'Roman Warm Period', the cold and miserable 'Dark Ages', the bounce-back to the warm Middle Ages, the troublesome Little Ice Age causing the extinction of the Khmer empire, and now the magnificent Anthropocene, the current warm period during which our civilization has flourished.

 

History tells us that warm periods are good. At the end of the Medieval Warm Period, around 1300 AD, temperatures dropped dramatically and the cold periods that followed were devastating. The population of Europe had become dependent on cereal grains as a food supply during the Medieval Warm Period, and with the colder climate, early snows, violent storms, and recurrent flooding that swept Europe, massive crop failures occurred, resulting in widespread famine and disease (Fagan, 2000; Grove, 2004). Glaciers in Greenland and elsewhere began advancing and pack ice extended southward in the North Atlantic, blocking ports and affecting fishing. Three years of torrential rains that began in 1315 led to the Great Famine of 1315–1317, and of course, extensive droughts followed by massive floods destroyed the Khmer civilization.

 

I think scientists probably have a good idea as when we are overdoing it.

 

What do you mean by 'it'? CO2 emissions? There's a lot of pollution resulting from human activities, such as plastic and industrial waste, and pesticide and fertilizer run-off affecting the Great barrier Reef, but CO2 is a clean and odorless gas which is essential for all life. Plants just love it.

 

There are many scientists who think that human emissions of CO2, at the current rates, have a relatively insignificant effect on the current warming. The temperature in the desert can change drastically from day to night because the air is so dry, lacking water vapor, that heat escapes rapidly at night. The daytime temperature averages 38°C while in some deserts it can get down to -4°C at night. The 0.04% of CO2 in the desert atmosphere doesn't seem to help much in preventing the extreme cooling at night, although it does help the Cacti, small bushes and short grasses grow better in the extremely dry conditions.


 

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2 hours ago, VincentRJ said:

The next 'true' Ice Age might be a long way off. During the last Ice Age, glaciers have advanced and retreated over 20 times, often blanketing North America with ice. Our climate today is actually a warm interval between these many periods of glaciation, known as an interglacials. The most recent period of glaciation, which many people think of as the "Ice Age," was at its height approximately 20,000 years ago. This is more correctly termed the 'Last Glacial Maximum'. The last Ice Age began about 2.6 million years ago.

 

Within these many cycles of 'glacials and interglacials', there are smaller cycles such as the flourishing 'Roman Warm Period', the cold and miserable 'Dark Ages', the bounce-back to the warm Middle Ages, the troublesome Little Ice Age causing the extinction of the Khmer empire, and now the magnificent Anthropocene, the current warm period during which our civilization has flourished.

 

History tells us that warm periods are good. At the end of the Medieval Warm Period, around 1300 AD, temperatures dropped dramatically and the cold periods that followed were devastating. The population of Europe had become dependent on cereal grains as a food supply during the Medieval Warm Period, and with the colder climate, early snows, violent storms, and recurrent flooding that swept Europe, massive crop failures occurred, resulting in widespread famine and disease (Fagan, 2000; Grove, 2004). Glaciers in Greenland and elsewhere began advancing and pack ice extended southward in the North Atlantic, blocking ports and affecting fishing. Three years of torrential rains that began in 1315 led to the Great Famine of 1315–1317, and of course, extensive droughts followed by massive floods destroyed the Khmer civilization.

 

 

 

 

What do you mean by 'it'? CO2 emissions? There's a lot of pollution resulting from human activities, such as plastic and industrial waste, and pesticide and fertilizer run-off affecting the Great barrier Reef, but CO2 is a clean and odorless gas which is essential for all life. Plants just love it.

 

There are many scientists who think that human emissions of CO2, at the current rates, have a relatively insignificant effect on the current warming. The temperature in the desert can change drastically from day to night because the air is so dry, lacking water vapor, that heat escapes rapidly at night. The daytime temperature averages 38°C while in some deserts it can get down to -4°C at night. The 0.04% of CO2 in the desert atmosphere doesn't seem to help much in preventing the extreme cooling at night, although it does help the Cacti, small bushes and short grasses grow better in the extremely dry conditions.


 

Im with you up until "There are many scientists who think that human emissions of CO2, at the current rates, have a relatively insignificant effect on the current warming." unless by many you mean about half a dozen

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