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BANGKOK 26 June 2019 01:29
webfact

Bangkok governor blames power problem for major flooding on Friday

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23 hours ago, shady86 said:

Why leaders here can't blame themselves for thier incompetence. I wonder what will be the blame victim next?

Have you ever heard a leader or politician anywhere in the world accept responsibility for anything, I haven’t.

Thats one of the requirements for the role.

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It is strange that it is always someone else or even the bad weather and the rain responsible for this misery ever those who are the real culprits!

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On 11 June 2019 at 10:07 AM, ben2talk said:

They don't even understand the nature of Voltage, Current or Power. They will change the voltage to a higher current?

It's clear they're just talking with zero knowledge whatsoever. The power supply voltage is surely standard 3 phase 440v by the time it reaches the equipment... 

 

They still haven't solved the problem about how to fix a cable without turning off power to a few dozen houses at a time... The whole purpose of an electrical grid is that you can make repairs and divert power without removing it from other people. Surely a system like this must have an independent supply of power... It seems obvious that this is the problem - a ramshackle wet string powersupply for an overgrown city. Investment clearly better diverted to buy new watches and submarines.

 

Perhaps they should study a model of the UK power grid. I don't remember any instances of brownouts or power cuts since the coal strikes in the 1970's.

 

Thailand is clearly around 50 years behind the UK, so can we expect it to be sorted in the next 5 years?

Standard 440 volt 3 phase? You have a lot to learn. High voltage motors 3.3kv, 6.6 and 11kv are not uncommon in industry.

The op mentions 100 amp fuses......don't get much power at 440 volts. Lucky to get 50 kilowatts at that voltage and current. The standard is 380 volts for small three phase motors in much of SEA.

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Posted (edited)
37 minutes ago, emptypockets said:

 

Standard 440 volt 3 phase? You have a lot to learn. High voltage motors 3.3kv, 6.6 and 11kv are not uncommon in industry.

The op mentions 100 amp fuses......don't get much power at 440 volts. Lucky to get 60 kilowatts at that voltage and current. The standard is 380 volts for small three phase motors in much of SEA. By small I am referring to under 500 kilowatts.

For the partially educated/uneducated fuses are quite a complex thing. Most posters understand domestic fuses but I doubt many understand motor fuses or HV transformer fuses. It can be a quite specialised area of electrical engineering.

For example a motor may be rated at 100 amps BUT on start up it may draw many magnitudes of current and the fuse should not blow during this condition. Not unusual for the current to be 7 times the motors rated current for a Direct On Line motor starter for a few seconds until it gets up to speed.

 

Of course there are numerous ways to limit this inrush current using different types of motor starting circuits.

Edited by emptypockets

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And why did nobody blame the lack of maintenance to start with ?

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On 6/11/2019 at 3:06 AM, webfact said:

Aswin said he will step down if that will help save the capital from inundation. “But the truth is: if I quit, who will solve flood problems?” he said. 

 

Perhaps someone more competent than YOU!!!

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On 6/10/2019 at 8:06 PM, webfact said:

The voltage of fuses was also boosted from 100 to 200 amps

If that fails, try a one inch metal bar.

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Posted (edited)
On 6/11/2019 at 5:25 AM, Crossy said:

Part of the design of this type of project is provision of adequate power supply, probably redundant in case one source goes down.

 

Wasn't there a problem last year with some diesel pumps, lost keys??

 

Around these parts...it's perpetually SOMETHING!!!!

 

The dog is constantly, endlessly eating their homework!  

 

PS - I too was wondering what the heck they were talking about with "soldering stations"????  Maybe they've got crews out there soldering the new fuses into place?   :cheesy:

Edited by TallGuyJohninBKK
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BTW, on the broader subject, is there actually any such things as a locally licensed electrician/electrical engineer in Thailand?

 

I mean, any kind of Thai government testing and qualifications system here for people who want to do that kind of work?

 

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Thailand is so screwed in the next couple of decades - there will be a lot of chickens coming home to roost. Both in drought and floods. 

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Have you ever heard a leader or politician anywhere in the world accept responsibility for anything, I haven’t.
Thats one of the requirements for the role.
Yes there are. Theresa May from UK and many Japanese politicians. Try read more world news.

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Double the size of the fuses and they may well become soldering stations if by soldering they mean melting metal.

 

The guide for replacing fuses with nails is, standard are quick blow, and galvanised are slow blow. One would not want to accidentally overload the circuit by using the incorrect type of nail.:whistling:

 

Cheers

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On ‎6‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 1:06 PM, webfact said:

The voltage of fuses was also boosted from 100 to 200 amps

Sorry, but just increasing a fuse's capacity may not be a good thing!  Fuses are there to prevent damage to other components.  Sure would be a shame if now they burn out and melt some motors or other gear

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