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Mass UK protest demanding second EU referendum planned days before Brexit

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1 minute ago, Becker said:

Yes, the UK is propping up the rest of the EU financially. Sure....OK.

“Sure….OK” … maybe check your own grammar 

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12 minutes ago, bizboi said:

oooh a grammar nazi - how petty - sign of losing an argument i can see now run along and teach your Toefl class !!

 

What, no emojis??

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9 minutes ago, Becker said:

What, no emojis??

No unfortunately they dont do the one Id like to send to you - have a good english class 30 baht for today is it?

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4 minutes ago, nauseus said:

Not hyperbole. I mean what I say. If you had looked at the Brexit threads on here and my posts for the last 3 years you might not make such noise. I did not say 600 mil people need 60 mil people more than the other way around.

 

The EU has carefully changed its treaties and arrangements over time so that the UK has steadily lost influence within this rats maze. Almost all of our vetoes have disappeared - we have lost more than 40. The UK is often outvoted by other EU members so that we do not have any true control on our own laws and taxes. Any rebates are to disappear soon. Now, QMV means that we can be subjected to directives and regulations that we don't want at all but are helpless to stop. The UK has had success with the ECJ in less than 30% of cases that it is concerned with. Almost all control of our affairs has gone.  

 

The "game" now includes this "Withdrawal Agreement"; a treaty so bad for Britain that it must have been composed by the EU, or its agents. In December last, the ECJ (unusually quickly) opened the door for the UK to allow it to unilaterally choose to remain in the EU, just one day before the first parliamentary vote on this ghastly "Withdrawal Agreement". How about that?

 

The EU obviously want us to stay. Most of the EU members presently benefit as being net beneficiaries so they are mainly happy (for the time being). 

 

But the Brexit decision was handed to the British people and the majority favoured leaving, which to me, must be the best course. The EU has been to happy to do the UK down for too long and it shows no sign of reform - rather the reverse - so we should go!  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HDFegpX5gI

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, Becker said:

That Fry up is not a response! I've seen it. Just because Germany can specify what bits and pieces have to go in a stein this does not imply that even Germany is fully sovereign.

 

You'll have to do a lot better than this.  

Edited by nauseus
G
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Best if brexit is dumped in the Thames and the Tory party with it, which will happen in the next election if the PM tries to leave the EU with no deal.

 

And for Brexiteers, tough, the ERG should have passed May's deal through parliament. And if anyone questions the veracity of that deal, all I gotta say is have you read it to make such an accusation?  

 

The best way forward for the PM is to accept the WAG deal, but agree with the EU to alter the political statement as to the best way forward.

 

Doesn't take a genius to resolve the impasse - not that BJ has any idea and would probably only be in a job until October. 

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29 minutes ago, Loiner said:

Best if Brexit is brought forward by Boris. He has only one job, but it's a big one - To get us out and break the EU/Remainers impasse.

Remainers can forget another referendum - it's just not going to happen. They can forget WAG too - that's been kicked out three times already. The Merkel/May Surrender Treaty has caused so much strife in the Tory party, he can set about repairs there after we have left, always assuming there is any Tory Party left.

 

As far as reading the deal, remember it's supposed to be a joint Withdrawal Agreement but the legal small print, published by Brussels, shows what this means. Parliament will be asked to ratify a deal which clearly admits that ‘all references to ‘Member States’ and competent authorities of Member States…shall be read as including the United Kingdom.’ (Article 7). So the UK will be bound by EU laws, at least during a transition period. But this ‘transition period’ can be be made to last forever (Article 132).  And even if a successor deal is agreed, the UK will have signed away other rights for years to come. There's a list of the top 40 horrors lurking in the small print of Theresa May’s Brexit surrender. You can check them if you want.

In summary: The supposed ‘transition period’ could last indefinitely or, more specifically, to an undefined date sometime this century (“up to 31 December 20XX”, Art. 132). So while this Agreement covers what the government is calling Brexit, what we in fact get is: ‘transition’ + extension indefinitely (by however many years we are willing to pay for) + all of those extra years from the ‘plus 8 years’ articles.

Should its transition period end within two years, the UK will still be signed up to clauses keeping us under certain rules (like VAT and ECJ supervision) for a further eight years. Some clauses have, quite literally, a “lifetime” duration (Art.39). If the UK defaults on transition, we go in to the backstop with the Customs Union and, realistically, the single market. We can only leave the transition positively with a deal. But we sign away the money. So the EU has no need to give us a deal, and certainly no incentive to make the one they offered ‘better’ than the backstop. The European Court of Justice remains sovereign, as repeatedly stipulated. Perhaps most damagingly of all, we agree to sign away the rights we would have, under international law, to unilaterally walk away. Again, what follows relates (in most part) for the “transition” period. But the language is consistent with the E.U. imagining that this will be the final deal.

 

 

The very best way forward for Boris is to immediately reject the WAG; stop all contributions; declare UK independence; invite the EU for some <deleted>ture trade talks if they want to come to see us. No genius there and impasse solved.

Well put. Good precis. We can't even fight any of it away from the ECJ if we sign it. Ridiculous.

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Posts critical of grammar reported and removed along with replies.  

 

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