Jump to content
BANGKOK 24 July 2019 15:33
Jingthing

Issues of Economics and Ethics about Expats Moving from "Richer" Countries to "Poorer" Countries

Recommended Posts

no, its purely rational and undoubtedly weigh in

in the decision for everyone.

for me it was spending power, climate,

and the hope for less pain through a combo of spending power-massage & climate-less pain again

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, swissie said:


- At some time in the future the expression "We are not in Kansas anymore" may well take another profound meaning:


"Why did we ever leave Kansas in the first place?"


In conclusion: While the "Geographical-Arbitrage" is still worthwhile and attractve: Enjoy while it lasts! After that, it's back to Kansas.
Cheers.

Estimates are about 2 million house servants in the USA almost all women of color.  So they have them in Kansas too.  Even in Switzerland where estimates are 4% of the workforce are cleaning peoples homes and other domestic jobs.  

Edited by marcusarelus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, swissie said:

It's more a question of how long this "Geographical-Arbitrage" will remain possible. As "western Countries" are hitting the ceiling as far as economic growth is concerned, so called 3rd world countries have much leeway on the upside. This future projection is already mirrored by looking at currency exchange rates.
- 10 years from now, (especially concerning S/E Asian countries), the "Geographical-Arbitrage" is likely to no more exist. (Globalization in full action.)
The only places left for "Geographical-Arbitrage", 10 years from now, may be Zimbabwe, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Honduras and Guatemala.
- Long term Farangs relying on monthly (fixed) pensions in form of "rock solid hard western currencies" will find their Retirement-Plans greatly disrupted, especially in S/E Asia.
(We all know some UK-Expats that have experienced "negative currency developpements". With dreamy eyes they tell the tale of when the exchange rate was 70:1).


The same to be repeated with other "rock solid hard western currencies". Just a matter of time.


I find, that next to the dazzeling smile of a Thai-Lady, the above should be part of any retirement-planning in connection with future "Geographical-Arbitrage". Always in mind, that the benefits (the opportunities) of "Geographical-Arbitrage" are getting slimmer by the passage of time. At least as long as the concept of "Globalization" remains unchallenged.
- At some time in the future the expression "We are not in Kansas anymore" may well take another profound meaning:


"Why did we ever leave Kansas in the first place?"


In conclusion: While the "Geographical-Arbitrage" is still worthwhile and attractve: Enjoy while it lasts! After that, it's back to Kansas.
Cheers.

Sure. Conditions change.

However, as a retired USA dollar based person I don't see the opportunities for geographical arbitrage in some countries going away anytime very soon.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, swissie said:

Marcus, read full post. My post was not focusing on "House-Servants" in the US nor Eastern-Timbuktu.

Again, read full post. If too busy to read full post, don't comment. EASY!

Why comment if you don't understand my post.  Just ask and I'll explain it to you.  You wrote. "It's more a question of how long this "Geographical-Arbitrage" will remain possible. As "western Countries" are hitting the ceiling as far as economic growth is concerned, so called 3rd world countries have much leeway on the upside."  That is of course nonsense as the Western countries are encouraging immigration so they can take advantage of "Geographical-Arbitrage"  at home as Switzerland with 4% of it's workforce are in the home and being taken advantage of as domestic labor many illegally.  Expats take advantage of Thai people by living here and Swiss people at home take advantage of poor Asian people in their homes.  It's the same thing.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/14/2019 at 2:15 PM, Jingthing said:

don't agree with your emphasis on assimilation. We're always going to be foreigners especially in a culture such as Thailand. I think of it more as people trying to make successful ADAPTATIONS. Going totally native is quite eccentric for the vast majority of expats and most that say they even intend to do that or want to are fooling themselves, because that's not really want they want and that's not really what they're going to do. As far as the damage that masses of tourists and expats do to destinations, that's already happened in Thailand long ago. I think it's irreversible. 

Although maybe there are some backwater destinations here where that hasn't happened but I don't think those are places most foreigners really would want to live in

A fair point- possibly adaptation to the Thai way of doing things and having respect for  the culture.  There are many foreigners here who have no respect for anyone and unfortunately they stand out like a sore thumb.  they are not in the majority but enough of them acting out reflects on all of us.

 

What is interesting is that so many Westerners who have left their own countries come to a place like Thailand so they can live a better quality of life.  That doesn't say much for our own countries such as America where healthcare is a huge issue and the elected officials refuse to act.

 

In many of our native countries, governments refuse to provide adequate funded pensions; adequate increases in pensions and tax relief for the aged.

 

What has happened in the last 20 years is a perversion of the economic system in which the  wealthy class have accumulated huge amounts of wealth while the remainder of the population has remained static or regressed.  This is so in the US and certainly in Thailand where it is even more visible.

 

None of this is sustainable and will eventually be reversed either by a new breed of leader that  rises in several countries  and reverses the tend through fair taxation and labor practices.In some countries, the new leaders will rise in other ways such as coups or revolution or war.

 

If Thailand remains as is for the next 20 years with  only modest growth and a population under monetary and other stress- I doubt many foreigners will want to retire in Thailand. 

 

 In addition- should a new dynamic leader evolve who decides to change everything- and Thailand  has massive growth; a redistribution of wealth  and a large middle class- most Westerners won't be able to retire in Thailand as they can't afford it.  In fact there are some economists who are predicting  a 20% revaluation upward of the Thai Baht. 

 

In summary- it's common in all places for citizens to want to stretch their retirement money. Nothing immoral about that as long as the expat respects the local customs wherever that maybe.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...