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BANGKOK 19 July 2019 02:52
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Authorities discuss regulation of short-term accommodation in Phuket

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"The meeting was set up following inspections conducted by the Office of the Ombudsman which found that such property rental businesses are unapproved by law and can lead to various problems relating to unpaid taxes, guest safety, neighbourhood disturbances and contractual disputes."

 

"unapproved by law" - is this a translation error?

I thought short-term rentals of less than thirty days were 'illegal'?

 

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looking more and more like they are not going to shut it all down but regulate instead.

 

early days but a good step forward as things are getting out of control

 

will be interesting to see what they come up with

 

 

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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, bluesofa said:

"The meeting was set up following inspections conducted by the Office of the Ombudsman which found that such property rental businesses are unapproved by law and can lead to various problems relating to unpaid taxes, guest safety, neighbourhood disturbances and contractual disputes."

 

"unapproved by law" - is this a translation error?

I thought short-term rentals of less than thirty days were 'illegal'?

 

 

its a whole new class of accomodation, not quite hotel, kind of like how online work is not clearly defined in the work acts. i guess their options are shut it all down completely or come to a position were it can be regulated (read: taxed most probably). time will tell their true intentions but i'm leaning towards taxed and regulated as the current hotel act is unworkable for say a luxury villa but it could be construed as a a valuable commodity for the local market.

 

Quote

Officials also discussed the benefits of the market and its impacts, as well as potential rules, regulations, definitions, lessor and lessee obligations, and the assignment of agencies to be responsible for regulating and overseeing the market.

 

 

 

Edited by GeorgeCross

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Immigration fears to suffocate on all those TM30s

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Posted (edited)

Why not do what they did with another "illegal" problem that they just couldn't solve? I'm talking about the previous illegal taxi problem.

 

Make them all legal after making them fill out a few forms and give a bit of tax.

The market has changed and this is what tourists/customers want. In fact, in this instance it would be common sense instead of the previous cravenness of giving in to the white-plate taxis.

All of this is being driven by the big hotel chain lobbying group. A dinosaur. As with every business in Phuket over the last few decades............adapt, or die.

Edited by Joe Mcseismic
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The aim of the meeting was to exchange ideas on how to regulate the market and to stop people from renting out their properties illegally.

 


Unless they plan to knock down all the present hotels I don't believe 'regulation' is in the cards, especially when bnb users are renting properties 60% less than established businesses. The latter part of this statement is what I believe their true aim is, especially considering the lion share of illegally rented condos are foreign owned...

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Posted (edited)

yeah would be the sensible option but i feel some regulation would help for instance party houses (1/2 night rentals) shouldn't be allowed on moo bahns but weekly rentals should be if allowed by the residents authority. we have one house on our village that does this and its never been a problem in fact its quite refreshing to have some new faces to talk to by the pool. the owner never allows party rents and its always a group of scandinavian, russian families etc. no problem.

 

likewise why blanket ban party groups? thais have no problem with this and at my main house (which is standalone) we have many of them nearby and again its not a problem for us or anyone in the area as the houses are standalone and no-one is getting annoyed. to be honest the local temple markets are a lot more disruptive!

 

the condo issue would require a lot more thought as i understand the problems there. maybe leave it up to majority vote or something?

 

either way a one size fits all regulation is gonna need a lot of sub-paragraphs to keep most people happy.

 

 

Edited by GeorgeCross
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Officials emphasised that regulation would ensure better safety, service and quality for tourists, helping to make Phuket a sustainable global tourism city.

 

And that's where the article and perhaps the meeting ended. They agree that regulation is needed but will it actually occur?

 

Plenty of countries regulate short term Airbnb style renting, requiring licences, taxation, limiting night allowed to be sold and even banning it altogether.

 

There are plenty of examples of how to regulate such rentals out there. Phuket and Thailand should be able to find an offf the peg fix (adding the TM30 requirement, of course). But whatever they do it has to be enforced and that's where it all goes wrong!

 

There are plenty of examples

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My next holiday will involve a lot of airbnb stays and it seems in any popular location, the local gov't has instituted a tax on the owners which is passed along to the short term tenants. 

 

How they would enforce this and how the extra tax funds would be used is anyone's guess.

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Short term holiday rentals might benefit from regulation within the frame of making Thailand an attractive and profitable holiday destination.

 

But profitable for whom? The media sensationalise the very vety few complaints from the public. Reality is, it is only the hotel industry that is lobbying. And only the big, expensive, often foreign-owned, chain hotels. 

 

Small guest houses and airbnb offer similar service. And are similarily threatened. This is the livelihood of large numbers of little people who have put their life savings into small ventures.

 

The big chains are starting to feel the pinch in a down-turn in the tourist market. And are using their clout to kill the competition.

 

The ombudsman could work with the TAT to develop a good strategy forincluding this new "uberisation" of the hotel industry into what is best for the people and the economy. Ultimately, this means what is best for the customer.

 

So is it true that more and more tourists are shunning the big hotels? And if so, why is this?

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Regulate the ladycowboys and leave the airbnbers alone. They are the real troublemakers!

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1 hour ago, MartinKal said:
 

Short term holiday rentals might benefit from regulation within the frame of making Thailand an attractive and profitable holiday destination.

 

But profitable for whom? The media sensationalise the very vety few complaints from the public. Reality is, it is only the hotel industry that is lobbying. And only the big, expensive, often foreign-owned, chain hotels. 

 

Small guest houses and airbnb offer similar service. And are similarily threatened. This is the livelihood of large numbers of little people who have put their life savings into small ventures.

 

The big chains are starting to feel the pinch in a down-turn in the tourist market. And are using their clout to kill the competition.

 

The ombudsman could work with the TAT to develop a good strategy forincluding this new "uberisation" of the hotel industry into what is best for the people and the economy. Ultimately, this means what is best for the customer.

 

So is it true that more and more tourists are shunning the big hotels? And if so, why is this?

From what I see in Phuket it's only the big hotels that have any customers at the moment, mainly Chinese and a few Russians on packages. But, from what I've heard, they are working on extremelt small margins as these groups are negotiating very low rates but guarantee low-season occupancy. Some hotels are taking the view that it's better to have customers and make a little money whereas others are not entertaining the cheap package option at all.

 

I will also point out the rates charge by bigger hotels and resorts in low season. These are often a fraction of the high season rates. For under 1000 baht a night you can get a 3 star resort with pool, breakfast and facilities. This is another reason that smaller guesthouses are just about empty; the price differential makes the bigger places much more attractive. They're probably making very little money but enought to pay the bills and the staff

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Move  those glasses of water  away from any important papers.... 

 

Way too many knees under that  table poised  ready  to jerk. 

 

🙂

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