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BANGKOK 19 July 2019 02:10
pferdy62

House design engineering book

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Does anyone know of a book that is probably used by architects/engineers to design the posts and beams commonly used in the construction of buildings in Thailand?

 

I am hoping that it will contain something like a series of tables that describe the dimensions, rebar sizes and arrangements that would be used for different spans etc.

 

Thanks.

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I doubt that they are using books for that, as most design programs will have links to, or contain, software that does those calculations giving an exact custom design.

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24 minutes ago, pferdy62 said:

I am hoping that it will contain something like a series of tables that describe the dimensions, rebar sizes and arrangements that would be used for different spans etc.

It took me 3 years of evening study to calculate that stuff.

 

As SWW said once you choose whatever build you want calculations and materials costs can be incorporated in at the design stage.

 

This Constructor civil engineering link is only one page info it's the best site I have ever come across IMO, I have not looked at everything but it can be searched.

 

 https://theconstructor.org/concrete/concrete-calculator-slab-beam-column-footings/19717/

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This forum is the university of knowledge.

 

Just ask a specific question and there will be answers/solutions in plenty.

 

A couple of important things:

 

Keep a strict control over the water. Thais tend to overdo the water for ease of work.

 

Remember the function of reinforcing steel; compression and tension.

 

When pouring into moulds (beams especially) ensure that the formwork it water-tight.

 

Vibrators transformed reinforced concrete design a hundred years ago. Some Thais have yet to realise its effectiveness.

 

Good luck.

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Many thanks for your help.  I have my own personal slump cone that I used whenever I get concrete delivered.  It makes the truck drivers cringe when they watch me validate that the concrete has not been watered down.  One rejected load of CPAC seems to have done the trick.  Everything since has passed the 75mm slump test without a problem.

 

I have had to offer some advice to the builders on how to use a vibrator in the past.  They were just dragging it along the surface instead of making probes at regular intervals.  It was a reasonable building crew and they listened to my advice.  Well maybe only for that job.  

 

I am trying to boost my own knowledge so that I can verify (within reason) whether a design proposal is too light or too heave in terms of beam size and the rebar.  We are planning on building single storey apartments with beams of 6.5 metres which is way outside the comfort zone of most builders.

 

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i have a book on concrete engineering if you would like it. its PDF, 

 

get in touch via PM

 

Shaemus 

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Calculation for 6 meter span. Depends on grade of concrete and steel reinforcement used. Also not Thailand building regulations

 

For simply supported beams, L/d = 20, as per IS 456–2000

So, depth d = L/20 = 6000mm/20 = 300mm

This should also be not more than 1/4 th of the clear span, as per IS 13920–2016

d= 1/4*6000 = 1500mm

Hence depth can be taken as d = 300mm

b/d ratio of beam should preferably be more than 0.3, as per IS 13920–2016

So b/d = 0.3

b = 0.3d = 0.3*300 = 90 mm

But width should not be less than 200mm, as per IS 13920–2016

So take width b = 200mm

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Toosetinmyways, thanks for the feedback.  Is a beam depth of only 300mm going to be adequate?  most of what I have seen in Thai buildings is 200mm wide by 400mm deep, mostly with 4xDB12 rebar inside it when used on a 4m span.

 

I was expecting something along the lines of 200mm x 600mm with around 7 x DB15 or larger over that span.

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I’m no structural engineer, but L/d of 20 for a concrete beam seems high.  I expected more in the range of 12-18, and would have thought about 400mm was the minimum.  Does it come down to allowable deflection?

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Posted (edited)
On 6/17/2019 at 2:33 PM, pferdy62 said:

We are planning on building single storey apartments with beams of 6.5 metres which is way outside the comfort zone of most builders.

 

Wouldn't it be simpler just to hire a structural engineer to go over you basic design? 

Isn't the reason some local buildings lean or fall down because the owner didn't?

Edited by VocalNeal
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21 hours ago, pferdy62 said:

Toosetinmyways, thanks for the feedback.  Is a beam depth of only 300mm going to be adequate?  most of what I have seen in Thai buildings is 200mm wide by 400mm deep, mostly with 4xDB12 rebar inside it when used on a 4m span.

 

I was expecting something along the lines of 200mm x 600mm with around 7 x DB15 or larger over that span.

Really? Something like this?

IMG_7024.jpg.61d6bf77256e1213b9979ce031589bc4.jpg

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My example came from a USA standards building book. Unfortunately we are constructing in Thailand.

In my option the beam and post system in Thailand is over engineered.

Roof weight is to me the most important factor. A house using CP Monier tiles has the same beam and pillar dimension design as a house using Ayara tiles even though it is 1/3 the weight.

As previously mentioned by a poster, anything outside the 200 x 200mm post and 200x400mm spans for a 4 meter square modular building system will not be easily followed by the average Thai builder. 

I have a 7 meter concrete span in my house. it is 400x400mm post and 400x800mm beam. The beam is a tie in only with no load above. Calculated by a Thai structural engineer.

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On 6/20/2019 at 8:15 AM, Toosetinmyways said:

I have a 7 meter concrete span in my house. it is 400x400mm post and 400x800mm beam. The beam is a tie in only with no load above. Calculated by a Thai structural engineer.

I assume, the Thai structural engineer is RIGHT with this calculation!

 

He just knows, how building is done in this country:

- unskilled „craftsmen“, preferably cheap ones from Myanmar, who were farmers before

- mai bpen lai attitude

- poor handmixed or watered-down ready-mix concrete

- no idea how to set the rebars

- moulds not strong enough to keep the fresh concrete in form

... and the list goes on ...

 

Therefore: add 300% safety margin. 😎

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