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BANGKOK 16 July 2019 23:12
Brunolem

Thailand not same... in so many ways

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There never was a more appropriate motto than "Thailand not same" 

 

Considering the state of today's world, that may not be a bad thing in itself...up to a certain extent... 

 

In order to stick to its motto, Thailand is, in some cases, left stuck in the past, because it has not yet found an alternative to what is done elsewhere, which it certainly won't copy... Buddha forbid! 

 

Here are some a few examples of notsameness:

 

1. Carbon paper is still widely used

 

Carbon paper...??? Not same for sure... 

 

2. On TV, radio, in theaters and anywhere else, the audience must be informed that something funny is coming, by a whole paraphernalia of sounds (bicycle horn, cymbal, whistle, expanding spring) that were used elsewhere in small circuses decades ago, when the clowns were on scene, yet disappeared together with the circuses... not same, not same... 

 

3. While it has been long known that, in order to keep the traffic fluid, the lights must turn red/green frequently (every 30 seconds in Paris for example), Thailand prefers to keep them on for many minutes (up to 15 minutes for some traffic lights in Bangkok)... it also doesn't help that drivers in the Land of Smiles need to go through any crossroad in turn, each of the four ways one after the other, instead of the two ways facing each other going at the same time. 

 

Definitely not same... 

 

Feel free to share other examples of notsameness... there are so many... 

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, cranki said:

I CTRL C and CTRL V your post into google translate and still can't figure out what your talking about....

He same same farang but different.

Edited by Dexlowe
fix

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1 hour ago, Brunolem said:

up to 15 minutes for some traffic lights in Bangkok..

Never come across that before.

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3 hours ago, Pilotman said:

I doubt that Thailand is any better or worse than many other developing countries, it's just that it's technology has outpaced its ability to adapt, understand, plan and control it,  at a far faster rate than many others.   They have not had the benefit, as we in the more developed World have had, of 200 years of slow deliberate technological change, that enabled society to adapt and develop with it.  Just look at China as an example, 60 years from a backward, uneducated, rural based Nation to being one of the top dogs around.  No wonder people can't cope and don't understand.   

Good point... the problem now is that technology is changing so fast that even so-called developed countries can't adapt. 

 

While a few "techwiz" keep up to date, more and more are left behind, at varrying stages... 

 

This in turn adds to the growing inequalities among the populations. 

 

Meanwhile, in so-called developing countries, many people have jumped overnight from the 19th to the 21st century, without any understanding of the consequences. 

 

In my village, for example, I have seen people moving from a status/behavior of traditional farmer to that of TV or phone addicts, in a little more than 10 years. 

 

Yet, Thailand could do a better job at educating its population, instead of encouraging it to "being not same" and use this motto to cover all kinds of shortcomings... 

 

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11 minutes ago, Brunolem said:

Good point... the problem now is that technology is changing so fast that even so-called developed countries can't adapt. 

 

While a few "techwiz" keep up to date, more and more are left behind, at varrying stages... 

 

This in turn adds to the growing inequalities among the populations. 

 

Meanwhile, in so-called developing countries, many people have jumped overnight from the 19th to the 21st century, without any understanding of the consequences. 

 

In my village, for example, I have seen people moving from a status/behavior of traditional farmer to that of TV or phone addicts, in a little more than 10 years. 

 

Yet, Thailand could do a better job at educating its population, instead of encouraging it to "being not same" and use this motto to cover all kinds of shortcomings... 

 

Agree  with all that.  My own view is that the teachers should be the key, but they are often not up to the job and are as far behind,  if not further behind, than the kids they are teaching.  University/college level education are  little better in many many cases It all starts  with education. 

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well,yes and no i first came here in 1989,you could not get bread,i think from living here 7 years things have improved but addiction to mobile phones is unhealthy,my now seperated wife was never off hers,however i spent a day with my new girl and her adult daughter this week and i think her daughter took one call,my girl none,so i guess it depends on the person,but for sure the country is changing,they are catching up with the west,if only the education systen could and more could speak english this would propel them further forward,but i also think it is important they still continue with upholding their own culture as in any country.

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10 hours ago, Kwasaki said:

Never come across that before.

Maybe he can't tell the time.

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8 hours ago, swissie said:

Regardless of the number of Smartphones in use and how many cars are on the road.

-The way Thai's "think" has not changed 1 Iota compared to 30 years ago. Except (some) new age university students. But that is a negligeable minority.

Thailand is by far not the only country in SE/Asia that welcomes all technological "advances" but at the same time making every effort to adhere to "traditional-values".

 

So, inspite of "changes on the surface", inside the haeds of Thai's, nothing has changed. Not in the last 30 years. As far as this is concerned, it's strictly "same same". For better or for worse.

Well... yes and no... 

 

Some things have changed. 

 

For example, like their Western counterparts, Thais have become reliant (addicted) to government handouts and credit (debt). 

 

That was not the case 20 years ago, even though cars already existed at that time, but Thai people were more financially responsible than they have become...

 

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To really understand, value and adapt to technology and technological change, you must be able to relate to the world at large and to recent history.  Most Thai adults, never mind the kids, don't have the first idea of the world  around them, or the history or even the geography; certain;y not the science.  This results in an insular society that is always inward looking. Whether people like the idea or not, change, development and advancement for any Nation means a dilution of culture that is holding you back.  Thais have yet to recognise this.  

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17 hours ago, marko kok prong said:

well,yes and no i first came here in 1989,you could not get bread,

Not true.

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9 hours ago, swissie said:

Regardless of the number of Smartphones in use and how many cars are on the road.

-The way Thai's "think" has not changed 1 Iota compared to 30 years ago. Except (some) new age university students. But that is a negligeable minority.

Thailand is by far not the only country in SE/Asia that welcomes all technological "advances" but at the same time making every effort to adhere to "traditional-values".

 

So, inspite of "changes on the surface", inside the haeds of Thai's, nothing has changed. Not in the last 30 years. As far as this is concerned, it's strictly "same same". For better or for worse.

No, Thailand has changed so much. From third world farm country to developing factory/ manufacture country.

 

https://www.worldbank.org/en/country/thailand/overview

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