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BANGKOK 19 July 2019 07:29
Jonathan Fairfield

Over 200,000 uni seats empty despite TCAS being successful

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Over 200,000 uni seats empty despite TCAS being successful

By The Nation

 

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THOUGH all five rounds of the 2019 Thai University Central Admission System (TCAS) have been “highly successful”, more than 200,000 seats are still vacant, reflecting a serious need for Thai universities to improve, Council of University Presidents of Thailand (CUPT) chairman Suchatvee Suwansawat said on Sunday. 


The council will, in the middle of the next month, officially present the overall picture of TCAS 2019, which began in December to fill 445,364 seats in 91,340 programmes, he said. Since this is the first time that the CUPT has applied “Big Data” analysis for university admissions, the public will get to learn about students’ behaviour, such as why they prefer certain faculties and why they are willing to give up university seats, he said. 

 

Initial information shows that the first round (based on students’ portfolio) had the largest number of applicants; the second round (based on a quota system) saw the largest number of students confirming seats, while the fifth round saw the fewest number of students giving up their seats, Suchatvee said. 

 

In August, the CUPT will hold a brainstorming session with CUPT academics, universities and related agencies to see how the TCAS system can be improved and how issues such as students blocking others’ chance by applying to several institutes in the first and second rounds can be solved, Suchatvee said. 

 

The CUPT chairman also said the new minister of higher education, science, research and innovation would be invited for a special discussion with the CUPT to plan guidelines and measures to ensure university research projects cater to the country’s needs and respond to national strategy. 

 

He said the council had called on universities to be more motivated in conducting research and be ready to adhere to new budget rules. 

 

He said the CUPT had told the universities about Thailand’s needs in various aspects, especially the agriculture and industry sectors, and how cross-field, cross-university research proposals should be prepared for budget allocation. 

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30371661

 

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  • Haha 2

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Does this mean that the Universities are only half full? If so, that has cost and staffing implications. If fees go up because of fewer paying students, then even fewer students will apply and a downward spiral will ensue!


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Seeing first hand mining engineers who have the talent to become good engineer"s, but 

have no place of employment after finishing degrees,

and they keep pumping them out from uni, 

The system needs an overhaul to have opportunities once qualified to then learn, be employed in their chosen field, 

The restrictive attitude of mineral ministers, lack of understanding of mining by the populace, good environmental policies where mining can happen with the minerals Thailand possess, having the will to change it seems will take many generations, and waste all the brain power that could so benefit the community as a nation.

 

Only a small snippet of what is a massive problem.

 

 

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^^^VinnieK has it right.  Thais, like Chinese, Japanese and Europeans, are having fewer children.  Fewer children = fewer students.

 

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"Highly successful"....of course the drive has been successful....?

Abject failure if you ask me.

Hopefully some of the dodgy universities may fall by the wayside...instead of running a diploma mills!

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, dinsdale said:

Another example of just 'how well' the economy is going. 

I agree.

To many job, so easy to get the job. No need go to uni. No time for uni.

All the boss on West Coast need more workers now. Have to bring more from Burma to do it.

Edited by Yinn

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I wonder what the "445000 seats" actually means. Is that the number of full-time students the Thai universities are funded for? Or is it just the first-year entry numbers?

 

If the former, it would be woefully small for a country of c70 million. [Australia, with 1/3 the population, has that many FOREIGN students in its university system and some 1,500,000 full-time equivalents. Whether that's good or not is a different matter ... ]

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Like anywhere a university degree only serves to get your foot in the door. A few years experience in your chosen profession soon overrules any qualifications on a resume.  If your willing to maybe start a rung lower on the ladder you will end up at the same position as your degree holding colleagues. Only difference is you get paid while they accumulate debt for 3 or 4 years. 

 

If i had to do it over again i would skip university. Current president of the company i work at is a time served apprentice  

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I know a couple of kids who graduated with my son last year that still want to get a seat at CMU and are contemplating what the heck to do. Best luck to them. My son got accepted fast to CMU on his own merits. What a load off of everyone's minds.

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445,000 'seats' ( possible enrollments ) , divided by 91,000 programs ( possible courses ? ) = 4.89 seats for each program ?

 

Sounds odd to me...

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32 minutes ago, Yinn said:

I agree.

To many job, so easy to get the job. No need go to uni. No time for uni.

All the boss on West Coast need more workers now. Have to bring more from Burma to do it.

Not what I'm saying. I'm saying people don't have the money. 

  • Confused 1

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