Jump to content
BANGKOK 19 August 2019 06:27
davidst01

Vegetables contaminated with chemicals

Recommended Posts

Im a bit paranoid after reading the article below. Sometimes I stop at the markets to get some fruit and vege and now dont know if I should. 

 

Would this article apply to vege/ fruit purchased at Macro? 

 

If we have the means, would you think its a better option to only buy fruit and vege at 'Top Supermarket' - which is an expensive option but possibly best quality and thus less exposure to this problem?

 

Whats your opinion on this?

thanks

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just wash carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, potatoes. It's not practical to peel all those. I wondered why i was going a bit toxic green colour

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Sheryl said:

No reason to assume the supermarket produce has any less of the chemicals than the fresh markets.  Pre-washed produce may have a bit less, that's all.

 

Your best option is just to wash thoroughly.  Soaking first in a solution with baking soda or vinegar then rinse off under running water thoroughly

To create the solution, what should the ratio of baking soda or white vinegar to water be?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@davidst01 If you read the full article in Thai BPS, you will come across the following paragraph:

 

"She went on to say that fresh fruit and vegetables on the shelves of large department stores were more contaminated than those sold in local fresh markets, adding that products that are labeled as meeting GAP and GMP standards are safer as only 26% were found to be contaminated".

 

My wife always prefers to shop at the local markets and I trust her judgement, especially after reading this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A hard scrubbing with help lessen the chemicals  BUT  you can't get rid of what has been absorbed into the skin unless you remove the skin.  Of course,  they say the skin is very high in good vitamins so you can't really win...haha.  Good Luck to us all !!!  Happy Eating !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did they also compare vegetables from European or US stores? Large industrial farms use a lot of chemicals. They spray them from airplanes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sheryl said:

No reason to assume the supermarket produce has any less of the chemicals than the fresh markets.  Pre-washed produce may have a bit less, that's all.

 

Your best option is just to wash thoroughly.  Soaking first in a solution with baking soda or vinegar then rinse off under running water thoroughly

Vinegar is probably a better choice, at pH 2-3. Baking soda is not as strong, pH 9 against neutral pH of 7.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SiamAndy said:

To create the solution, what should the ratio of baking soda or white vinegar to water be?

 

I've seen 10% concentration of vinegar and 10 mg/mL  concentration of baking soda (i.e. 2 full teaspoons per liter of water)mentioned.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, FredGallaher said:

Did they also compare vegetables from European or US stores? Large industrial farms use a lot of chemicals. They spray them from airplanes. 

 

The testing was done by a Thai non-profit using a lab in the UK, and only tested fruits and veggies sold at various Thai supermarkets and fresh markets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Sheryl said:

the evidence seems better for baking soda as I have seen at least a few studies where vinegar use I have seen only websites saying it helps, no hard data.

 

But results will vary depending on the exact pesticide(s)  involved which of course is often  an unknown.

 

As noted above, there's pesticide residues that sit on the surface of fruits and veggies and can be washed off to whatever extent...  And then there's pesticide residues that are absorbed into the flesh of the fruit or veggie via its roots or tree and presumably cannot be washed off.

 

Washing obviously is better than nothing, but it only gets you so far.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sheryl said:

 

With both vinegar and baking soda the strength will depend on the concentration. Vinegar of course is acidic and baking soda is  alkaline but what is important is that in water both release ions that can bond with  pesticide compounds.

 

the evidence seems better for baking soda as I have seen at least a few studies where vinegar use I have seen only websites saying it helps, no hard data.

 

But results will vary depending on the exact pesticide(s)  involved which of course is often  an unknown.

I think that's the reason for using both baking soda and vinegar separately because each of those work on different pesticides.

Since we don't know which pesticide was used it's probably better to use both.

 

They both absorb different kind of chemicals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make sore to rinse between because one is acidic and the other is basic. Not rinsing will result in some nutrialization of second washing chemical. Of course you need to rinse when done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...