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BANGKOK 21 July 2019 13:27
Brunolem

Multiplying more and resting less, the plight of Thai children

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Members who have children in primary (prathom) school age may have noticed that they are "taught" multiplying tables all the way to... 13! 

 

One may wonder why stop here, unless it is a superstition thing... go wonder... 

 

Anyway, it shows that those in charge of the curriculum have not yet realized that they use a decimal system and that learning beyond the table of 10 is a waste of time, that could be spent on... holidays. 

 

In Europe, for example, children enjoy many breaks during the school year, such as a couple of weeks for Christmas and New Year, another couple of weeks in the middle of winter, to go skying or visit Thailand, another couple of weeks around Easter, plus a few shorter holidays depending on which country they live in. 

 

Meanwhile, Thai children get a couple of weeks in October, as a break between two terms, and that's it! 

 

Of course, after finishing school, they are "not same", which is probably the whole purpose of the system: they can multiply all the way to 13, a most useful ability, but they also need to regularly take a nap in order to compensate for the missed holidays of their youth... 

 

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34 minutes ago, Brunolem said:

Anyway, it shows that those in charge of the curriculum have not yet realized that they use a decimal system and that learning beyond the table of 10 is a waste of time, that could be spent on... holidays. 

I learned my 13 times table at the age of 10 in the UK. Later learned my 16 times table which became extremely useful in my working life.

 

As for holidays, 6 weeks summer holiday is the norm in the UK. In Thailand the holiday around Songkran is a couple of months. haven't done the full calculation but I'm sure Thai children get at least as many holidays as children in the UK.

 

The big difference is the school day. My son gets picked up in a minibus for the 15 minute journey to school at 7a.m. and doesn't return until 5.30p.m. In the UK, a typical school day is 9a.m. to 3p.m.

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It's not so much the time in school that's an issue, it's the extra classes that most kids take after school and on the weekends.

Many students only have a few hours of free time every week.  They spend so much time with these extra classes that many students are burned out and cannot pay attention during their regular classes.

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2 hours ago, petemoss said:

I learned my 13 times table at the age of 10 in the UK. Later learned my 16 times table which became extremely useful in my working life.

 

As for holidays, 6 weeks summer holiday is the norm in the UK. In Thailand the holiday around Songkran is a couple of months. haven't done the full calculation but I'm sure Thai children get at least as many holidays as children in the UK.

 

The big difference is the school day. My son gets picked up in a minibus for the 15 minute journey to school at 7a.m. and doesn't return until 5.30p.m. In the UK, a typical school day is 9a.m. to 3p.m.

It took a long time for the UK to join the decimal system... I remember these pounds = 20 something, each of these = 12 something else... 

 

Meanwhile, in the rest of Europe we were happy to stop at 10...

 

 

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18 minutes ago, Brunolem said:

It took a long time for the UK to join the decimal system... I remember these pounds = 20 something, each of these = 12 something else... 

 

Meanwhile, in the rest of Europe we were happy to stop at 10...

 

 

Yes £sd. Librae solidii denare (pounds shillings and pence)

Still remember using rods, chains and furlongs to measure distance. Some units are still used. Most people outside the UK can't understand me when I quote my weight as xx stones and yy pounds.

 

I don't know why we ever did change. SI came in around the time that I left school. Originally devised by the French. Vive la difference!

 

 

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6 hours ago, Brunolem said:

It took a long time for the UK to join the decimal system... I remember these pounds = 20 something, each of these = 12 something else... 

 

Meanwhile, in the rest of Europe we were happy to stop at 10...

 

 

Well i do the 1000 times table now i live er.

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Posted (edited)

It's a tool, so what... the Lefties will say they shouldn't learn them at all, and of course, they are still split on the use of Phonics.  They should also learn the prime numbers.. another great tool, once you start doing factorization. 

Edited by moontang

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On 7/5/2019 at 8:21 AM, otherstuff1957 said:

It's not so much the time in school that's an issue, it's the extra classes that most kids take after school and on the weekends.

Many students only have a few hours of free time every week.  They spend so much time with these extra classes that many students are burned out and cannot pay attention during their regular classes.

Gets me why Thais even learn to count. Every shop I have ever been to used a calculator  EG 100-20 oh must use the calculator. 

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On 7/5/2019 at 11:18 AM, petemoss said:

<snip>

 

I don't know why we ever did change. SI came in around the time that I left school. Originally devised by the French. Vive la difference!

 

 

UK changed many of our units when we joined the EU (or EEC as it was then).  

It'll be interesting to see if we go back once we finally manage to leave.  Somehow I doubt it..!! 

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3 hours ago, steve73 said:

UK changed many of our units when we joined the EU (or EEC as it was then).  

It'll be interesting to see if we go back once we finally manage to leave.  Somehow I doubt it..!! 

Officially yes but it's common practice to still use the old units. I still ask for 5lb of potatoes in my greengrocers. Bathroom scales still have the option st/lb or kilos. Horse races still use furlongs. PSI is still used widely, what the hell's a pascal?

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For the most part school is a babysitting service so parents can work, so, start early, go late, have very few holiday periods so grandparents looking after the grandchildren can survive. It is just not possible for young children to focus and learn from 7am to 5:30 pm. In Norway until 1997 children started school at 7 years of age and currently at 6 years of age. Classes are generally from 9am-3pm. Not so good for working parents juggling work schedules but Norwegians are well educated and seem well adjusted in life. 

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On 7/5/2019 at 7:29 AM, petemoss said:

I learned my 13 times table at the age of 10 in the UK. Later learned my 16 times table which became extremely useful in my working life.

 

As for holidays, 6 weeks summer holiday is the norm in the UK. In Thailand the holiday around Songkran is a couple of months. haven't done the full calculation but I'm sure Thai children get at least as many holidays as children in the UK.

 

The big difference is the school day. My son gets picked up in a minibus for the 15 minute journey to school at 7a.m. and doesn't return until 5.30p.m. In the UK, a typical school day is 9a.m. to 3p.m.

We were taught to 20. Back in them days there were 20 shillings to the pound and 12 pennies to the shilling. Weights & measures were rubbish too. 💷

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13 minutes ago, lagavulin1 said:

Weights & measures were rubbish too. 💷

The metric system is a beautiful invention, which only 3 jurassic countries have not yet adopted... 

 

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15 minutes ago, lagavulin1 said:

We were taught to 20. Back in them days there were 20 shillings to the pound and 12 pennies to the shilling. Weights & measures were rubbish too. 💷

8 half crowns in a £. 4 farthings in a penny. 20 florins in a £. 21 shillings in a guinea. Those were the days.

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