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WaveHunter

[KETO] Just How Important are Carbohydrates for Athletes...Really?

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23 hours ago, stephenterry said:

More or less what I thought. Replenishment of carbs around exercise would be sufficient for most people - with a 2-3 hour window before, and within one hour after. I'm pretty sure there's proven scientific evidence to support that health regime viewpoint.

 

On a tangent, and back to the actual workout:

 

I'm not into lifting weights, preferring HIIT workouts, which at the present consist of walking around the park (ten laps) for an hour four times a week. It (now) takes me under 6 minutes to walk (fast) one lap aerobically. Each lap is c.600 metres, so I'm covering around 6k per walk.  

 

After the first warm-up lap I'll walk as fast as I can for half a lap = 3 minutes, and recover during the second half by walking normally. I'll repeat this for 5 laps, so I'm carrying out a HIIT routine lasting 15 minutes, and a non-HIIT routine for 45 minutes.  It's strenuous enough for me.

 

All well and good, but I want to intensify my HIIT schedule by attending a local gym (costs 60 baht a session) for about an 30-45 minutes - probably by cutting my walk time to achieve that.

 

To 'build lean muscle from a fairly sloppy belly' as the main objective for an active old codger, what gym machines would you consider to be the most effective? 

 

  

One other thing I want to add to what I just posted is that you should not underestimate the importance of resistance training (barbell/dumb bell).  As you age, you naturally lose muscle mass.  Cardio will not address this; it actually hastens it.  Only resistance training will address it.  

 

As you age, aesthetics and vanity aside, maintaining strength in your skeletal muscles, your core, and posterior chain are vitally important for continued health and well being.  Resistance training is the only way to achieve this, and free-weights are BY FAR the best way to do it.

 

Thats not to say cardio isn’t important.  They both are.  But cardio without some form of strength training is not a good thing at all as you age.

Edited by WaveHunter

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Lots of good information in this thread.

I am not a fitness person per se, but mainly going to the gym to get rid of some bally fat, this has proven harder than I anticipated.

I don't do any kind if specific diet, keto or otherwise, but generally limit my food intake. I go to the gym twice a week each time doing 40 min flat out on a bike at about 170-175 W with a 160-165 pulse.

 

Am I on the right track or could I do something different to get rid of my belly?

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I am a big fan of machines.  After years of playing squash I have to be careful of compressing the vertebrae in my lower back.  Lifting heavy dumbbells or stacking plates onto a barbell are things I prefer to avoid.  Machines provide a great deal of flexibility in how you perform an exercise and they are much safer if you are working out alone.  Sometimes those small stabilizing muscles are a major limiting factor when it comes to working on the main muscle group you are trying to strengthen.  I prefer doing the strength moves first and maybe tweaking the stabilizers later.

 

If like me you are getting older, flexibility and balance are also very important to maintain.  I very seldom see anyone in our gym with any semblances of flexibility and most are much younger than I am.  I sometimes catch them watching me in the mirror and their expressions are priceless.

 

As for cardio, I prefer outdoor hiking, running or cycling. 

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54 minutes ago, villagefarang said:

I am a big fan of machines.  After years of playing squash I have to be careful of compressing the vertebrae in my lower back.  Lifting heavy dumbbells or stacking plates onto a barbell are things I prefer to avoid.  Machines provide a great deal of flexibility in how you perform an exercise and they are much safer if you are working out alone.  Sometimes those small stabilizing muscles are a major limiting factor when it comes to working on the main muscle group you are trying to strengthen.  I prefer doing the strength moves first and maybe tweaking the stabilizers later.

 

If like me you are getting older, flexibility and balance are also very important to maintain.  I very seldom see anyone in our gym with any semblances of flexibility and most are much younger than I am.  I sometimes catch them watching me in the mirror and their expressions are priceless.

 

As for cardio, I prefer outdoor hiking, running or cycling. 

Age does play into it but i seen 80 year old people still do deadlifts. It really depends of course if you have existing injuries. Machines do provide flexibility but you don't get the same out of it as free barbell exercises. (with a few exceptions of course) 

 

Flexibility wise you would indeed laugh about me big muscles (or at least bigger then most) and limited flexibility makes for quite a fun time removing a wet (from sweat) small t shirt clinging to my body. 

 

I really don't see much danger from barbell exercises unless of course you load them too heavy. But that is something that happens with some people (me included)

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1 hour ago, ExpatOilWorker said:

Lots of good information in this thread.

I am not a fitness person per se, but mainly going to the gym to get rid of some bally fat, this has proven harder than I anticipated.

I don't do any kind if specific diet, keto or otherwise, but generally limit my food intake. I go to the gym twice a week each time doing 40 min flat out on a bike at about 170-175 W with a 160-165 pulse.

 

Am I on the right track or could I do something different to get rid of my belly?

Limiting food intake and lifting weights.. just cardio does not cut it. Though I applaud you for your effort sounds like your really pushing yourself. 

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2 hours ago, ExpatOilWorker said:

Lots of good information in this thread.

I am not a fitness person per se, but mainly going to the gym to get rid of some bally fat, this has proven harder than I anticipated.

I don't do any kind if specific diet, keto or otherwise, but generally limit my food intake. I go to the gym twice a week each time doing 40 min flat out on a bike at about 170-175 W with a 160-165 pulse.

 

Am I on the right track or could I do something different to get rid of my belly?

If fat loss is your goal, my advice would be to be more concerned with what you eat, rather than how much.  You'll get a lot of conflicting opinions on this but my take is that most people who are overweight eat too much processed foods, pure and simple.  Cut down on those type of foods, and eat a well balanced mix of proteins and fats and minimal carbohydrates, and your body will take care of the rest...all without the need to go on silly weight-loss diets!

 

The human body actually has a remarkable ability to self-regulate body fat levels, provided we eat naturally occurring foods that don't screw up metabolic hormonal balance.  Problems occur when you are ingesting things like high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) which is found in almost all processed foods.  This is a unnatural concentrated carbohydrate, and IMHO it is the main cause of the obesity epidemic today.  

 

HFCS wrecks havoc on insulin and leptin balance and that's what so bad about them.  They screw up the body's ability to use carbs for fuel and instead promote carbs to be stored as body fat.  They blunt leptin response and as a result, our brains do not signal us that we have eaten enough, so we just continue eating.  Everybody's experienced this, like when you eat a bag a potato chips or a candy bar and still want more.  Processed foods are actually engineered to do this...just so you buy more!

 

I'm putting it simply, but if you want to know more, google for it.

 

Remember this important fact:  Proteins and fats are essential macronutrients for metabolic health.  Carbohydrates are not.  You should be sure you are getting enough protein and fats (which isn't hard to figure out).  Figuring out how many carbs to eat is another story.

 

As far as carbohydrates go, you can actually live in a healthy state on ZERO carbs but I'm not saying you should.  There is no minimum daily requirement for carbs.  The actual amount of carbs you want to consume has to do with your level of physical activity.  It's a subjective thing that you need to figure out through experimentation, trial and error because no two people will be the same.

 

If you're not getting enough, you'll feel like crap so it's pretty easy to figure out.  The goal should be to eat just enough to avoid that, and no more.  It's far more healthy to get your required calories from fats than carbohydrates.  Google for the underlying science to that statement.

 

Just my personal thoughts on this but it works for me.  I keep my carbs very low and make up the caloric difference necessary to maintain a good resting metabolic rate with healthy fats.  I have all the energy I need for day long bike rides or mountain climbs on my bike with minimal carbohydrates, and since I began to eat this way, I have never felt the need to go on a weight loss diet...never!

Edited by WaveHunter
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1 hour ago, robblok said:

Machines do provide flexibility but you don't get the same out of it as free barbell exercises. (with a few exceptions of course)

For me, I get a lot more out of an exercise I can do without getting injured in the process.

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Excellent feedback, thanks to all. I have to limit what I lift because I'm carrying an inguinal hernia  -albeit it's padded and corseted while exercising. 

 

Perhaps better for me to find some kind of resistance training that isn't all about lifting dumbells. To be honest, even if I was 100% for my age, dead-lifting weights doesn't appeal to me.

 

At a gym, I prefer cycling and rowing, and perhaps machine weight arm lifts.

 

As for diet, yes It's almost spot on ketosis, and fat is falling off. I've lost 3 inches around my chest, and 4 around my waist and buttocks. Weighing in at 70 kilos, and striving to firm up my belly. It's getting there...  

 

 

 

 

 

    

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2 minutes ago, villagefarang said:

For me, I get a lot more out of an exercise I can do without getting injured in the process.

I agree with that remark but free weights training is very safe, provided you learn proper technique from someone who knows how to teach it effectively.  The benefits of free weight over machines is quite significant when it comes to improving core and posterior chain stability, which is just as vital as primary muscle strength, and something that machines can not achieve nearly as effectively.

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3 minutes ago, stephenterry said:

Excellent feedback, thanks to all. I have to limit what I lift because I'm carrying an inguinal hernia  -albeit it's padded and corseted while exercising. 

 

Perhaps better for me to find some kind of resistance training that isn't all about lifting dumbells. To be honest, even if I was 100% for my age, dead-lifting weights doesn't appeal to me.

 

At a gym, I prefer cycling and rowing, and perhaps machine weight arm lifts.

 

As for diet, yes It's almost spot on ketosis, and fat is falling off. I've lost 3 inches around my chest, and 4 around my waist and buttocks. Weighing in at 70 kilos, and striving to firm up my belly. It's getting there...  

 

 

 

 

 

    

I have three herniated discs (one is extruded) from martial arts.  It doesn't prevent me from lifting weights.  In fact, when I saw a neurosurgeon when I thought I might need back surgery, he actually told me to start working out with kettlebells!  I swear!  Totally freaked me out that he'd recommend that.  But fact is, he was right.  It fixed my back pain issues.

 

I'm not saying you should be crazy and start power lifting or anything.  But, in Crossfit I met many people with back issues who were able to get a lot out of cross-fit.  Again, the key is finding someone who knows how to train people with physical issues.  It might sound contrary, but the best thing for such injuries can be exercise if it's done properly.

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29 minutes ago, nzrick said:

ExpatOilWorker said:

"Am I on the right track or could I do something different to get rid of my belly?"

 

Yes, you could. First, stop consuming any form of sugar, be it sucrose, fructose, etc., and don't eat any food that will convert to sugar in the body.

Sugar is a poison and is responsible for and/or contributes to many diseases.

Remember the purpose of eating is to ingest nutrition. Educate yourself about this topic, as it's important.  So called"healthy food" is not always healthy. For example, fruit juice is very unhealthy, whereas whole fruit including the fiber, eaten in moderation only, can be healthy.

95% of the body is affected by what you eat; only 5% is affected by exercise. Ergo, stop wasting your life at a gym, take control by learning the truth about real nutrition. It could save your life, not just lose your belly fat! 

Edited to add that the above post by Wavehunter, which I only saw after I had already posted this, probably says it all. 

I agree with you on your view of nutrition but disagree about the gym.  I think they go hand-in-hand.  It's true that fat loss will only occur from nutrition, but resistance training greatly effects metabolic hormonal balance which in turns makes it easier for the body to access and use stored body fat.  You say 95% / 5%.  Personally I believe it's more like 60% / 40%. 

 

Could you lose body fat entirely from a nutritional strategy?  Sure you could, but incorporating resistance training makes your metabolic state much more efficient which encourages more body fat to be accessed, and more dietary nutrients to be used as fuel.

 

Just my opinion but I think resistance training (more than even cardio) is important not only for fat loss, but for optimizing metabolic health which prevents it from returning, and since we lose muscle as we age, it's important for that as well.

 

But for sure, avoiding processed sugar and being careful even with natural sugar (i.e.: whole fruit) is the most important thing, not only for fat loss, but more importantly, for long-term optimal metabolic health.

Edited by WaveHunter
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1 hour ago, villagefarang said:

For me, I get a lot more out of an exercise I can do without getting injured in the process.

True, but there is no need to get injured from barbel exercises if done properly. I fail to see for instance how a bench press is dangerous. A squat if done correctly (not in your case with existing injuries) is safe and a deadlift with the right technique is safe too.

 

Having said that I got a lat pull down machine and use it for lats and triceps. But the biggest bang for your buck you get from compound barbell exercises. 

 

Still there are some great machines for legs. 

 

I don't see why a machine would be safer then a a free weight exercise with the correct weight. Sure you need instruction but it really is not that hard. My motor control is far from perfect but most exercises are real easy.

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