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Isaanbiker

Where do I find the right Gasoline for my Moped?

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33 minutes ago, Isaanbiker said:

Regarding Yamaha, 87 octane is okay for this bike. 91 octane with 10 % ethanol seems to be okay.

Since you mentioned several times 87 octane it got me thinking. I haven't seen 87 octane RON so far but in the US and a few other places they have 87 octane AKI. Two different systems for measuring octane. Now the bike is from Japan which uses RON. Do you have the original owners manual for this bike or did you maybe download one from the web which could be for a US model? Just curious.

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58 minutes ago, Isaanbiker said:

I'd never thought about that. After some Googling, it seems that you're right:

I never knew that either! why the Thai's call 95 "Benzine" which basically is a German slang term, doubt we will ever know the answer. 🙂 

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5 minutes ago, CGW said:

I never knew that either! why the Thai's call 95 "Benzine" which basically is a German slang term, doubt we will ever know the answer. 🙂 

Being German I can tell it's not really slang but the normal term for petrol (Benzin, without e). The slang term would be "Sprit".

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9 minutes ago, eisfeld said:

Another chemists Justus von Liebig a bit later then assigned the name "Benzin" to the fuel we are talking about. [1]

Interesting, what adds confusion is that "some" petroleum has ~ 0.5% Benzine, then one has to wonder why only the 95 is called Benzine here in Thailand - maybe the Benzine increases the octane rating to 95?

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7 minutes ago, CGW said:

Interesting, what adds confusion is that "some" petroleum has ~ 0.5% Benzine, then one has to wonder why only the 95 is called Benzine here in Thailand - maybe the Benzine increases the octane rating to 95?

The 0.5% you mention probably is Benzene (german "Benzol"), not Benzine (papa got that one right). European Norm 228 says Benzine can contain up to 1% Benzene.

 

Benzine is called that way in Thailand maybe because that's close to the original name of what this is. Gasoline would be also a weird name as it's not a gas. That term also has an interesting history involving a guy in Dublin not wanting to comply with a trademark complaint for Cazeline so he changed the C to a G making it Gazeline... 🙂 [1]

 

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gasoline#Etymology

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7 minutes ago, eisfeld said:

Since you mentioned several times 87 octane it got me thinking. I haven't seen 87 octane RON so far but in the US and a few other places they have 87 octane AKI. Two different systems for measuring octane. Now the bike is from Japan which uses RON. Do you have the original owners manual for this bike or did you maybe download one from the web which could be for a US model? Just curious.

I've bought the bike last August and I've got almost all owner's manuals for different 1100 cc Viragos. Unfortunately, not for the one that was an import from Japan, all I could find out was that it "came to Thailand in parts". 

 

  But considering that mine's one of the 2,500 bikes with the frame and engine number 4 PP- + five digits where not as much information is available, I'd have thought that the fuel Yamaha recommends must be the same for all 1100 cc engines.

 

  Here's a part of a owner's manual for the 1100 cc:

 

Your Yamaha engine  has been designed to use   regular   unleaded   gasoline  with   a pump  octane  number  ([R+M]/2)  of 86 or higher, or research octane number of 91 or higher. If knocking  or pinging  occurs, use a different brand of gasoline or premium unleaded  fuel.  Unleaded  fuel  will   give  you longer spark plug life and reduced  maintenance cost. If unleaded gasoline is not available, then leaded regular gasoline can be used.

 

 

Gasohol

There are two  types  of gasohol;  gasohol containing ethanol and that containing methanol. Gasohol containing ethanol can be used if ethanol content does not exceed

10%.  Gasohol  containing  methanol is  not

recommended by Yamaha  because  it can cause fuel system damage  or vehicle performance problems.

 

How would I find out if certain gasoline, or gasohol contains methanol?

 

  

 

 

   

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1 hour ago, eisfeld said:

Being German I can tell it's not really slang but the normal term for petrol (Benzin, without e). The slang term would be "Sprit".

Danke schoen. 

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14 minutes ago, eisfeld said:

The 0.5% you mention probably is Benzene (german "Benzol"), not Benzine (papa got that one right). European Norm 228 says Benzine can contain up to 1% Benzene.

 

Benzine is called that way in Thailand maybe because that's close to the original name of what this is. Gasoline would be also a weird name as it's not a gas. That term also has an interesting history involving a guy in Dublin not wanting to comply with a trademark complaint for Cazeline so he changed the C to a G making it Gazeline... 🙂 [1]

 

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gasoline#Etymology

Yep, the amazing English language does the rest! Americans call it gasoline, or gas, Brits call it petrol, Germans call it Benzin. And we all need it somehow. 

 

 Thais use a few words that originate from Germish, for example the word technologie, or technology in English.

 

Anyway, when you ask a guy at a Thai gas station how much ethanol their gasoline, or petrol contains, you could also ask them a few questions about the universe.....with the same result. Of course would nobody say that they don't know it. 

 

  I tend to believe that I just had old Benzine 95, as not too many people are buying that stuff. Thanks a lot for the answers. Khop Khun La lai. 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

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^ Agree, looks like Thai use ethanol.

 

2019-07-19 14_17_17-E85 - Towards a Sustainable Future - Opera.png

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5 hours ago, eisfeld said:

 

I know you guys know this but for others:

 

There is no E91 and at least currently in Thailand no E95. The E prefix is used to specify the ethanol percentage in the fuel. So E91 theoretically would be 91% ethanol.

 

All gasohol - both 91 and 95 octane - in Thailand is E10 so 10% ethanol.

 

Benzine has 0% ethanol and in Thailand comes with 95 octane rating.

 

IMHO it's better to say "gasohol 91", "gasohol 95" or "benzine" for the common motocy fuels.

Well for you I think E91, 95 same same just a short way no sweat.

E20 is even higher octane. 😂

 

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Posted (edited)

Kwasaki , I believe E20 has 95 RON octane rating , same same as E10 95 , just with 20% Ethanol. E85 may (?) have a higher RON rating , but can only be used in "Dual fuel" vehicles. There are RON , MON and AKI ratings. Thailand uses RON and Ethanol.   The OP,s bike , if used regular , will be fine with E10 91 or E10 95.  If there is a Shell garage nearby , i would use Shell V-power , which is said to maybe contain just 7 % Ethanol , and is RON rated at 95 octane.  Thank you (danke) eisfeld for the information. Every day is a school day. 

Edited by ktm jeff
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On 7/17/2019 at 2:40 PM, CGW said:

Your pretty well screwed if it wont run on 95 octane "Benzine" (no idea why they call it "Benzine" it's got maybe 0.5% Benzine in it?) everything else on the market is some type of gasohol. May be worth trying a "hotter" spark plug with the 95?

ptt benzene give me significant more mpg vs any type of gasohol mix, but end of the day i still have same miles for money (pcx 150).... advantage to put “pure” benzene is: les often need visit to pump and it’s better for engine components.... 

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Replacing or adjusting (sometimes you have adjustable nozzles) carburetor nozzles wouldnt help? For 87 octane (normal) you have probably bigger nozzles, but if you go up in octane you would need smaller ones, as there is more octane in it.

You ever tried the E85 then?

 

 

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