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BANGKOK 19 August 2019 00:04

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Just wondering if anybody here has tried curing meat in this weather, mainly interested in pork. I have done a lot of curing in the past but never here in Thailand, I miss having my own cure meats  but not sure how it would work here in this heat 

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Seems too humid to me, though the Thais seem to do it with various seafoods well enough. I use a Stockli dehydrator to make pork jerky.

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I cure it all the time.  Get a needle and inject the cure.  Put it in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for 24 hours and cook at a low temp in the oven. 

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Get Prague powder #2 from Lazada or at any Thai store they put a packet of sodium nitrate in any seasoning mix for Thai sausage - nam powder.  Don't use the seasonings in the package just the small pack of sodium nitrate (packed separate).

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18 minutes ago, marcusarelus said:

I cure it all the time.  Get a needle and inject the cure.  Put it in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for 24 hours and cook at a low temp in the oven. 

Noooo. Don;t inject it. You need a long, slow cure.

 

I dry cure pork. Mix my own cure (slat, pepper, pink salt and what ever takes my fancy at the time). Rub the meat with the cure mix. Refrigerate for a week. Take the pork out the fridge. Rinse it and cook as you wish.

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Posted (edited)

Interesting. I dehydrate the meat (takes about 8 hours), then add some homemade piri piri chili oil to it, along with some chipotle spicing. Mix, mix, mix until all of the pieces have been nicely coated, then enjoy. The dehydrated meat sucks up the piri piri oil and the spices stick to the outside somewhat. Mmmm...

Edited by GalaxyMan

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, puchooay said:

Noooo. Don;t inject it. You need a long, slow cure.

 

I dry cure pork. Mix my own cure (slat, pepper, pink salt and what ever takes my fancy at the time). Rub the meat with the cure mix. Refrigerate for a week. Take the pork out the fridge. Rinse it and cook as you wish.

There is a reason why 95% of ham is injected to cure.  My granny just before the Civil War in the hills of Virginia when curing ham injected around the bone to make sure the cure penetrated all of the meat and her grandmother when curing ham for General Washington did the same thing.   

Edited by marcusarelus

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An off topic post has been removed.

 

Moved to Western Food in Thailand forum.

 

2.30am and you're all making me salivate.

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The dry cure is what I'm used to, generally only use a little salt added to make Italian sausage, never used nitrate before. True though the Thai sausage seems to work for them. 

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19 hours ago, marcusarelus said:

There is a reason why 95% of ham is injected to cure.  My granny just before the Civil War in the hills of Virginia when curing ham injected around the bone to make sure the cure penetrated all of the meat and her grandmother when curing ham for General Washington did the same thing.   

You said you cure in "24 hours". That is impossible. Cannot get a decent cure in that time. You are making salted pork. Not cured.

 

Commercially cured hams and bacon are injected for quick results and to keep the water content high to gain weight and thus get more money for the meat.

 

The results??? A wet and flavourless product.

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1 hour ago, puchooay said:

You said you cure in "24 hours". That is impossible. Cannot get a decent cure in that time. You are making salted pork. Not cured.

 

Commercially cured hams and bacon are injected for quick results and to keep the water content high to gain weight and thus get more money for the meat.

 

The results??? A wet and flavourless product.

I used to make dry cured ham and I used to turn it every day for at least a week.

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