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Doctor warns of flu complications

By The Nation

 

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Photo Courtesy of Dr Manoon Leechawengwongs (Facebook.com/604030819763686/)

 

Type A Influenza can be fatal if lung infection sets in, Thai pulmonary disease expert Dr Manoon Leechawengwongs warns.

 

The doctor cited as an example a case of 57-year-old Thai man in reasonable health and a habit of smoking half a packet of cigarette daily who caught Type A Influenza and died 30 days later of fungus infection in respiratory tract and lung.

 

In his Facebook post this week, the doctor from Bangkok-based Vichaiyut Hospital said the unnamed patient caught the flu after visiting a sick friend in hospital several days in a row. The man developed a dry cough and fever and was admitted to hospital three days later where he was treated with Tamilflu medication for five days along with antibiotics and steroids. His condition improved slightly but he then relapsed. The Type A Influenza caused severe pneumonitis and compromised his immune and doctors discovered Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus fungus in his respiratory tract and lungs. The patient died 30 days later.

 

Dr Manoon also said there were 192,445 influenza patients in Thailand - 14 of whom have succumbed to the fatal complications mostly involving lung infections.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30373253

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand  2019-07-19

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Pneumonitis. Medical information about Pneumonitis | Patient

  • Causes of Pneumonitis
  • Epidemiology
  • Presentation
  • Differential Diagnosis
  • Investigations
  • Management
  • Complications
  • Prognosis
  • Prevention
  • Causes of pneumonitis include: 1. Pneumonia. 2. Inhalation of foreign matter, usually of stomach contents when vomiting (aspiration pneumonitis). 3. Pertussis. 4. Exposure to an inhaled allergen (hypersensitivity pneumonitis) - eg, humidifier lung, farmer's lung, bird fancier's lung. 5. Connective tissue diseases. 6. Adverse reaction to a drug or toxic chemical; many household and industrial chemicals can cause acute and chronic pneumonitis: 1. Exposure to dangerous levels of chlorine gas may...
Aspergillus fumigatus causes infection in humans more often than any other Aspergillus species. People who handle or who are exposed extensively to Aspergillus fumigatus often develop a hypersensitivity to it so that they develop severe allergic reactions to the mold.

Aspergillus fumigatus is often found growing in decomposing organic material. Of all the Aspergillus species, Aspergillus fumigatus is the most tolerant to temperature and can grow in environments between 20 degrees Celsius and 55 degrees Celsius.
 
I wonder what the patient did for a living?? Worked with plants/agriculture or chemicals?
Did he  have influenza as well and that compromised his immune system ??
 

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I so wonder at what point they started treating the fungus infection.

 

Considering he was on antibiotics that sounds to me like they were treating it as if it was a bacterial infection.

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33 minutes ago, ukrules said:

I so wonder at what point they started treating the fungus infection.

 

Considering he was on antibiotics that sounds to me like they were treating it as if it was a bacterial infection.

It seems as if they started treating the fungal infection as soon as they found out about it which according to the article was 30 days before he died.Probably unlucky he wasn't treated by Dr House  or he could have been saved!

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6 hours ago, FarFlungFalang said:

It seems as if they started treating the fungal infection as soon as they found out about it which according to the article was 30 days before he died.Probably unlucky he wasn't treated by Dr House  or he could have been saved!

Oh really? I wonder why they didn't they treat him with the appropriate anti fungal medications then?

 

It sounds like they were treating a bacterial infection to me. No mention of voriconazole or itraconazole in the article - that would be the appropriate treatment.

 

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in europe some 30k die every year from complications after flu. Flu is not common in thailand, as in europe, so probably deaths comparable with dengue. 

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antibiotics don't work for fungus... incompetent MD ... if they had done a lab test on the sputum, but thailand = antibiotics first and for anything, no need to know what that of bacteria you have OR not ... as antibiotics also don't work for ... flu ...

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1 minute ago, justin case said:

antibiotics don't work for fungus... incompetent MD ... if they had done a lab test on the sputum, but thailand = antibiotics first and for anything, no need to know what that of bacteria you have OR not ... as antibiotics also don't work for ... flu ...

or any virus, but try telling that to Thai doctors, or to many UK doctors. They dish them out like sweets. 

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Lesson?

If you haven't done so yet ..........

Get vaccinated with Tri Valent flu vax.

  • Haha 1

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, ukrules said:

Oh really? I wonder why they didn't they treat him with the appropriate anti fungal medications then?

 

It sounds like they were treating a bacterial infection to me. No mention of voriconazole or itraconazole in the article - that would be the appropriate treatment.

 

Sorry for the sarcasm (I may also have been a little facetious) but the way I read it they were treating for a bacterial infection then discovered the fungal infection so one would naturally assume they would have then started treating the fungal infection from that point but as you point out there is no mention of treating the fungal infection so who knows what went on,doctors aren't immune to mistakes or even malpractice Again sorry for being a d!ckhead!

Edited by FarFlungFalang

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17 minutes ago, tomazbodner said:

So Tamiflu doesn't work, then?

works given within 48h of first symptoms, not after many weeks

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2 hours ago, Pilotman said:

or any virus, but try telling that to Thai doctors, or to many UK doctors. They dish them out like sweets. 

Yes never seen Thais come away from a doctor visit without a big bag of mixed lollies.I've often seen these lovely looking lasses lurking around the hospitals (you can see them swamping any hapless doctor who happens to show his face) peddling the wares of big phama and dare say the odd "special service" thrown in for the preferred customer.

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Flu of course killed over 40 million after world war one, it's been a killer for a long time.

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18 hours ago, ukrules said:

I so wonder at what point they started treating the fungus infection.

 

Considering he was on antibiotics that sounds to me like they were treating it as if it was a bacterial infection.

I've experience with Thai doctor who tend to treat symptom without ever obtaining cultures and testing the culture to see what is causing the problems. Got an infection?  Throw antibiotics at it.  Don't worry about taking a culture to see exactly what is causing the problem.  So fungal infections are completely overlooked.  If that causes death - so sad too bad.  Try suing a Thai doctor or hospital for malpractice.  :dry:
However, I'll give props to my current family doctor.  She's a 'test a culture first and prescribe medicine later' type.  I appreciate that.  Especially in an era when antibiotics are widely over-prescribed and may actually be prescribed for conditions that are fungal or viral.   

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8 minutes ago, Orton Rd said:

Flu of course killed over 40 million after world war one, it's been a killer for a long time.

It's Mother Nature's way of culling the herd.  "Big Pharma" loves to perpetuate the myth of immortality through expensive drugs.  At some point it is simply time to check out.  Even multi-billionaires can not ward off the eventual arrival of death, yet many of them at advanced ages look as though they are themselves the walking dead. 

Conditions like Influenza and pneumonia are nature's way of providing a quick way out for those with compromised immune systems which happens as you age.  But, some people insist on lingering while their quality of life goes down the crapper.  Personal choice I guess.   Imho, it's simpler to acknowledge your own mortality and embrace it when it arrives.  If it comes in the form of influenza, welcome it, give it a hug, embrace it like a friend who is going to take you home.
That's this Buddhist's perspective.  If you culture that attitude you'll find that when death finally does show up, and it will, you won't be scrambling around in a panic trying to escape the inevitable.  However, I don't expect many to see it the way I do.  Everyone's mileage will vary.  :thumbsup:

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