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BANGKOK 18 August 2019 20:32
Thaivisa Web Content Team

Father Pulls Son Out of School So He Can Focus on Video Games Full Time

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In a time when parents around the world are becoming increasingly concerned about how much time their children are spending in front of the computer screen playing popular video games like Fortnite, one Canadian father is sparking controversy for supporting his son’s eSports career, going as far as pulling him out of school so he could dedicate more time to video games.

 

Dave Herzog, a 49-year-old entrepreneur from Sudbury, Canada, has been “breeding” his son, Jordan, for an eSports career for over a decade. A longtime gamer himself, Dave claims that he put a gaming controller in his son’s hands when he was just three years old, and it didn’t take long for him to show that he had a true gift for gaming. By age 7, he was already a skilled Halo player, and at age 10 he was already dominating local gamers that Dave himself had put him in contact with. But it was when Jordan won his first Halo tournament, which earned him $2,000 worth of gaming apparel, that Dave Herzog realized his son could make a career out of it.

 

“A light-bulb went off,” Dave recently told The Boston Globe. “Once he started winning, it was easy to go all in.”

16-year-old Jordan “Crimz” Herzog is already one of the world’s most successful Fortnite players, and having qualified for this year’s World Fortnite Championship along with 200 other players from around the world, he stands to win a share of the $30 million prize pool. But while his father claims he has an innate gift for gaming, his success isn’t all talent.

 

Jordan spends between 8 to 10 hours every day playing Fortnite, eats in front of his computer so he can watch YouTube videos and talk with his teammates, and attends school classes online, so he doesn’t loose too much time away from the keyboard.

 

Dave Herzog took Jordan out of school last year, over the initial protests of his mother, and doesn’t regret his decision one bit. In fact, after Jordan qualified for this year’s main Fortnite tournament, he emailed his old school to let them know how much money Jordan stands to make if he places well enough. There was some controversy surrounding his decision, with people accusing him of child abuse, but he claims it’s only a matter of perception. If it was sports or piano, people would be fine with it, but because it’s video games, it’s abuse, he says.

 

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What gamer kid would not like to drop out of school to play video games fulltime?

 

Who knows, we may read about a new young billionaire entrepneur in a few years...👍

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Wonder how his social skills are; might be hearing about him later flipping out and killing people in real life.

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2 minutes ago, ross163103 said:

Wonder how his social skills are; might be hearing about him later flipping out and killing people in real life.

Or just smoking pot during interview and talking about his electric cars on the moon idea ? But I  very much doubt it and will come another child victim of his parents obsession more likely.

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The comparison about sports or gaming is assinine.  Parents do not and have never taken their kids our of school to play sports full time.  In fact for a lot of kids and I speak from experience if you do not have the education then teams will pass on you.  I worked in the OHL Junior hockey where kids are for the most part looking at the path to the NHL and one of the things that teams look for is if the kid is doing great in school and well rounded.

 

Yes if they are playing basketball or football in the states it might be a little different but then again look at the kids that make it and fail because they can not get the hood out of their lives.

 

It will be interesting to see what happens to this kid in a couple of years.  Thankfully there are laws in Canada that make it mandatory that the child be home schooled and pass provincial tests.

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, kingstonkid said:

The comparison about sports or gaming is assinine.  Parents do not and have never taken their kids our of school to play sports full time.  In fact for a lot of kids and I speak from experience if you do not have the education then teams will pass on you.  I worked in the OHL Junior hockey where kids are for the most part looking at the path to the NHL and one of the things that teams look for is if the kid is doing great in school and well rounded.

 

Yes if they are playing basketball or football in the states it might be a little different but then again look at the kids that make it and fail because they can not get the hood out of their lives.

 

It will be interesting to see what happens to this kid in a couple of years.  Thankfully there are laws in Canada that make it mandatory that the child be home schooled and pass provincial tests.

When I was a kid in Canada I had many friends pulled out of school at 15 to play professional hockey.  I always thought it was a bit young but you know Canada and hockey.

 

Because of his high level of play, McDavid was granted Exceptional Player status by Hockey Canada and was allowed to be entered in the 2012 OHL Priority Selection at age 15, a year earlier than he would have otherwise been eligible.

Edited by marcusarelus

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Smart move... the father probably voted for Trudeau... 

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2 hours ago, cornishcarlos said:

I wonder how much he weighs ??

He is actually slim. It looks like his father is the one fighting (or not) obesity. 

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Slim yes but look at how pale his skin is. Looks like he's never seen the sun ..... except on his computer screen 😜

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so what if he streams his playing daily, gets some promotional deals and wins a few tournaments no reason he could not make 20-40million in 4-5 years of playing maybe even more or he could go to school then university and probably never earn close to that in his lifetime......

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2 hours ago, theonetrueaussie said:

so what if he streams his playing daily, gets some promotional deals and wins a few tournaments no reason he could not make 20-40million in 4-5 years of playing maybe even more or he could go to school then university and probably never earn close to that in his lifetime......

This is not football or Formula One we are talking about, but video games. 

 

The guy would be lucky if he made 30 to 40...thousand in the next 4 or 5 years... 

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52 minutes ago, Brunolem said:

This is not football or Formula One we are talking about, but video games. 

 

The guy would be lucky if he made 30 to 40...thousand in the next 4 or 5 years... 

It’s not a secret anymore that top esports earnings can reach millions of US dollars per year, but did you know that the average esports salary is about $60,000? 

https://info.jkcp.com/blog/professional-gamer-salary-esports/

 

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