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Pizza


SteveK

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I'm sure that pizza tastes great but it just look very unconventional.

 

Pesto on pizza should be a crime.

 

Where are you putting these sauteed onions, in the sauce, or on the pizza?


A good pizza should consist of a very simple hand made dough, a very, very basic tomato sauce with little more than tomatoes, onions, garlic and seasoning, and good quality mozzarella cheese. The simpler you can keep it, the better it will be. Of course, if you want the real Italian taste you need to be using 00 flour which Makro sells, and San Marzano tomatoes for the sauce (which are expensive in Italy, let alone in Thailand).

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7 minutes ago, SteveK said:

A good pizza should consist of a very simple hand made dough, a very, very basic tomato sauce with little more than tomatoes, onions, garlic and seasoning, and good quality mozzarella cheese.

I just chop up a tomato (making sure it isn't too wet) to put on the dough, then the cheese and the topping.

pizza.jpg

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1 minute ago, BritManToo said:

I just chop up a tomato (making sure it isn't too wet) to put on the dough, then the cheese and the topping.

That's basically what the Italians do, but they have incredible San Marzano tomatoes.

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3 hours ago, SteveK said:

I make the base myself, and do not pre-cook it but allow 2-3 hours to prove. Then apply my home made pizza sauce, then the toppings cheese last with a pinch of oregano sprinkled on the cheese. I've got one of those Otto-style ovens, I put it on max temperature about 10 minutes before I put the pizza in. I have previously been cooking my pizzas in a BBQ and it could take up to 30 minutes to cook properly.

 

If there's any demand for it, I can post up my precise recipe so that anyone can make it exactly the same.

Pizza looks great Steve, look forward seeing your recipe and I'll give it a go.

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13 hours ago, marcusarelus said:

No Pizza stone?  Does the oven get over 300c?

As I said previously, I made a stone out of a thick ceramic tile, and top temp on my over is 240C. It works fine.

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11 hours ago, SteveK said:

I'm sure that pizza tastes great but it just look very unconventional.

 

Pesto on pizza should be a crime.

 

Where are you putting these sauteed onions, in the sauce, or on the pizza?


A good pizza should consist of a very simple hand made dough, a very, very basic tomato sauce with little more than tomatoes, onions, garlic and seasoning, and good quality mozzarella cheese. The simpler you can keep it, the better it will be. Of course, if you want the real Italian taste you need to be using 00 flour which Makro sells, and San Marzano tomatoes for the sauce (which are expensive in Italy, let alone in Thailand).

To each his own, but with all due respect, I think you're the one who may need to broaden your pizza horizons. There are many different styles of pizza, including the Chicago deep dish which the pan pizza in the photo I shared most closely resembles. There's nothing "unconventional" about the pizza I showed, except maybe if you're of a mindset that pizzas ought to be circular shaped. To answer your question, I put the carmelized onions on top of the cheese along with the other toppings such as tomatoes.

 

Pesto was invented in Italy. All of its ingredients lend itself perfectly to pizza: basil, pine nuts, garlic, olive oil. "Often considered "pizza for adults," a pizza topped with pesto instead of red sauce is a nice change from the traditional pie. It opens the door to so many different types of toppings such as grilled chicken or shrimp, or a vegetarian pizza with artichoke hearts and kalamata olives. Wonderful as a dinner with a side salad, pesto pizza is also ideal cut up and served as an hors-d'oeuvre. " [quoted from internet]

Image result for pesto pizza image

Image of pesto pizza with olives, mushrooms and red bell peppers. [from the internet]

 

@sfokevin Are you referring to Thailand when you said 'we live in a country that serves ketchup with pizza? I've never eaten pizza in a Thai restaurant so I wouldn't know, but equating pesto with ketchup doesn't make sense to me at all.

 

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Gecko123 said:

To each his own, but with all due respect, I think you're the one who may need to broaden your pizza horizons. There are many different styles of pizza, including the Chicago deep dish which the pan pizza in the photo I shared most closely resembles. There's nothing "unconventional" about the pizza I showed, except maybe if you're of a mindset that pizzas ought to be circular shaped. To answer your question, I put the carmelized onions on top of the cheese along with the other toppings such as tomatoes.

 

Pesto was invented in Italy. All of its ingredients lend itself perfectly to pizza: basil, pine nuts, garlic, olive oil. "Often considered "pizza for adults," a pizza topped with pesto instead of red sauce is a nice change from the traditional pie. It opens the door to so many different types of toppings such as grilled chicken or shrimp, or a vegetarian pizza with artichoke hearts and kalamata olives. Wonderful as a dinner with a side salad, pesto pizza is also ideal cut up and served as an hors-d'oeuvre. "

Image result for pesto pizza image

Image of pesto pizza with olives, mushrooms and red bell peppers.[from the internet]

 

@sfokevin Are you referring to Thailand when you said 'we live in a country that serves ketchup with pizza? I've never eaten pizza in a Thai restaurant so I wouldn't know, but equating pesto with ketchup doesn't make sense to me at all.

 

I took some Thai friends to a good pizza restaurant a while back.  The waitress brought them ketchup.  It was awful.  I just cringed in silence.  The stuff my wife adds to my French bean soup is enough to cause a divorce but I've learned to be still.  I remember my first pizza's from Uno's and Due's. 

 

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How are people cooking your pizzas?... I have a standard countertop oven that only goes to 250c and a terracotta tile as a pizza stone... I have tried cooking with the rack/tile in the bottom, middle and top and can never really get a good crust...

 

The best result I have really got is with no stone and a perforated Teflon pizza pan that I start out on the bottom and move up the last minute or two to broil the top... But I feel like I’m just cheating ;-)...

 

What I’d like to get is one of these...

Next trip back to the States I’m going to put this in the return suitcase...

 

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Toshiba ER-LD430C(W)

Capacity 31 Liter

Size (W)x(D)x(H) : 500 x 460 x 412 mm.

Weight 22 kg.

Multifunctional, can be used as a microwave, Convection, Grill or Steam.

Hybrid Convection is a synergy between hot steam and baking at a high temperature

The Steam function cooks your food using steam, making your food soft and not tough to eat.

Adjustable temperature, the highest temperature being at 350°C

The iconic Toshiba Infrared Sensor is a technology developed to cook your food at the perfect temperature and duration.

Easy to use with 49 automatic recipes to choose .

1 year product warranty and 5 year magnetron warranty.

 

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Toshiba ER-LD430C(W)

Capacity 31 Liter

Size (W)x(D)x(H) : 500 x 460 x 412 mm.

Weight 22 kg.

Multifunctional, can be used as a microwave, Convection, Grill or Steam.

Hybrid Convection is a synergy between hot steam and baking at a high temperature

The Steam function cooks your food using steam, making your food soft and not tough to eat.

Adjustable temperature, the highest temperature being at 350°C

The iconic Toshiba Infrared Sensor is a technology developed to cook your food at the perfect temperature and duration.

Easy to use with 49 automatic recipes to choose .

1 year product warranty and 5 year magnetron warranty.

 

From Lazada

 

IMG_2309.JPG

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I never did succeed at least at two things in life so far: 1. Glueing something together properly 2. Making a pizza (because of the dough). Please help me to overcome the second obstacle.

 

I read the receipe posted above by @Gecko123 but for my capabilities I need a more foolproof version. Its the ingredients and the measurements that would make me fail, apart from the cooking instructions. I only have a standard oven which goes up to some 250 degrees celcius or so.

 

Then the ingredients: Somewhere a "00 - Type flour" was mentinoned here (to be obtained at Macro), but I am not sure which flour exactly to buy (need a picture) and where (I live in Pattaya). Same for yeast (if needed). I have even used a special flour for pizza obtained at Macro before and failed miserably 3 times with that one.

 

The aim is to obtain a pizza with a softer, yet crispy rim (should at least be brown or very dark). The main problem is that my dough gets far too hard. It should be soft in order to be palatable yet still be crispy a bit on the outside. I have been living in Switzerland and have visited Italy for decades, eaten hundreds of authentic and phantiastic Pizzas so I know how it should be but my versions do not come even close.

 

Can somebody please please post a receipe for the dough (toppings I can handle) and its preparation- and cooking instructions indicating

 

1. Ingredients (which flour exactly and yeast (if used) incl. the source near Pattaya to be sure, best with a picture)

2. Measurements in ml, grams or at the max tbs, tsp (metric system, no "cups" or anything unspecific)

3. Preparation instructions (like kneading time, time to let it go at which temerature etc.)

4. Cooking instructions (temperature, time)

 

I thank you really very much to help me solve this pizza dough challenge. I will post a picture here once I have been successful (or even if I was not a picture of my failed attempt).

 

 

 

 

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