Jump to content
BANGKOK
3421abc

Thailand VS Vietnam? Which one will be better in 5yrs?

Recommended Posts

32 minutes ago, gamesgplayemail said:

And how is weed there ?! Easily available ?

So I'm led to believe - not that I indulge of course, along with vaping, vape shops, cheaper cigarettes and readily available NRT products at a fraction of the cost in Thailand, should a person wish to stop completely - in five years time, or indeed of course right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, phkauf said:

I can see the VN communist system going away in time - the country is very young and many of the old "true believers" are dying off at a rapid clip. Talk with anyone under the age of 30 (which is half the country) and you will hear utter disdain for the communist system. Unlike China, the internet is open and free so people are able to see what is really going on in the world outside and they desire the same things. Things will change as Hemingway said "Gradually, and then suddenly".

Thailand ain't changing. The military and the elites will see to that as they have since the 1930's.

Politics is a taboo topic in Vietnam. It is rarely discussed. When you ask Vietnamese why, they put there wrists together (Handcuffs). Their disdain for the regime might be indirectly expressed by their fascination of everything American, and in South Vietnam by their dislike of northerners(the regime is after all northern) 

Mostly, they are simply not interested in and knowledgeable about politics :They can't change anything, so they have given up on it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, CNXexpat said:

What I saw in Hanoi was, that all pay the same at tourist attractions.

 

Do you only have been in Old Town? I live 20 minutes from the city Center away in a modern bungalow beside a lake in quiet nature, but still in Chiang Mai. What means "in the middle of nowhere"? Because there is no other big city nearby? Because it´s surrounded from beautiful nature? Which city in Vietnam isn´t in the middle of nowhere following your definition of Chiang Mai, where 1 mio. people are living?

When I was in Hanoi last March the air was minimal better than in Chiang Mai, but also very bad. 

 

Yes that's largely true but there are exceptions. Also, dual pricing is not well publicized everywhere so foreigners, especially tourists are often unaware of the practice. In Laos for example, in some places where I thought that dual pricing wasn't practiced, it actually is - what happens is a Lao person simply tells the ticket seller they are Lao (khoy pen kon Lao) and they get a 50% discount. Later I discovered this was printed behind the counter (in Lao, which I can read) to state that Lao citizens get a 50% discount. So rather than write out "khon Lao 10,000 Kip" they simply write: admission 20,000 Kip and then in words "Lao citizens get a 50% discount". Therefore, anyone looking for a different number don't see it. In Laos, they have their own numbers but they are used even more rarely than in Thailand, for some reason. Could be that the Communists decided to make it easier on the population just to use Arabic numbers and leave Lao numbers for historical purposes and advertising.

 

Perhaps Vietnam is similar in some places, you just have to look. I look for the word that means "foreigner" written in Vietnamese then I know there's dual pricing though it's true that at the majority of tourist attractions, dual pricing is no longer practiced. One well known exception that I know of is the Imperial palace in Hue. Definitely dual pricing there - I experienced it myself. Also, in general there are fewer tourist attractions of the type that one can find in Thailand, therefore there are fewer opportunities for the authorities to impose dual pricing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, SteveK said:

How many old black men or old white women are ex-pats in Thailand?

There is a disproportionately large amount of Thai women who genuinely like white guys in Thailand, so white men flock to where they feel they have the greatest chance to marry (or just get laid). Black men have the opposite experience - I have some black friends and they all said the same thing: went to Thailand once, faced racism and women they approached ran away from them, never again.

 

As for white women - what do they have to look forward to in Thailand? They can do better back home. Not to mention there are significantly more male expats than female ones everywhere, not just Thailand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, spidermike007 said:

I tend to think he is right, when it comes to Thailand. Old or young, they just do not seem to want white tourists, or white ex-pats. White means western. Their xenophobia, and racism has really ratcheted itself up a few notches lately. I am not referring to most Thai people. I think alot like us, or at the minimum, are indifferent to us. I am referring to the administration, and most government workers, who are getting indoctrinated by the hyperbolic and extremely ignorant nonsense coming from the top. 

 

I am not sure this relates to "most Asian nations". But, it is true here in Thailand, unfortunately. 

Actually, it is most Thais :Arguably one of the most xenophobic countries in the world. I would say they don't even consider us farangs fully human (absolutely nothing to do with age, as a previous poster suggested:it's a racial thing). And it's not from the top down, it permeates the whole of Thai society. A 3-year old has learned it already, when they point you out to their parents and say 5555 a farang. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, thecyclist said:

Actually, it is most Thais :Arguably one of the most xenophobic countries in the world. I would say they don't even consider us farangs fully human (absolutely nothing to do with age, as a previous poster suggested:it's a racial thing). And it's not from the top down, it permeates the whole of Thai society. A 3-year old has learned it already, when they point you out to their parents and say 5555 a farang. 

I agree with some of that. We are definitely outsiders, and will always be outsiders to most of them. But, I know many who are genuinely kind and caring, and not that way at all. Once you get past the whole outsider thing, and no longer view that as a form of racism, life here gets easier. It is not personal for me. I have no need to belong. I have a great wife, and I adore her wonderful family. They are my family, and I am a part of their family. Her friends treat me with genuine affection and respect, and I meet many Thais who may see me as a fareng, as that is just their culture. But, there is no dislike or racist angle there. It is just that I am not one of them. Means virtually nothing to me. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, thecyclist said:

Actually, it is most Thais :Arguably one of the most xenophobic countries in the world. I would say they don't even consider us farangs fully human (absolutely nothing to do with age, as a previous poster suggested:it's a racial thing). And it's not from the top down, it permeates the whole of Thai society. A 3-year old has learned it already, when they point you out to their parents and say 5555 a farang. 

Thailand is prolly one of the least xenophobic country in Asia - did you ever spend time in Korea or Japan? I am not saying it's not xenophobic here but the rest is worse.

I have an office in seoul, and they don't even let me in in clubs and bars in certain areas. And i am white, blue eyed german...black friends have it way way worse. 

Japan, Singapore etc - all the same: https://thediplomat.com/2018/08/racism-and-apartment-hunting-in-east-asia/

No need to mention Chinas reeduction camps even...

 

I don't think it's a big issue in Thailand compared to the rest of Asia. After all Thailand is the one country most used to Westerners and normal Thai's don't have any issue with us.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, thecyclist said:

Actually, it is most Thais :Arguably one of the most xenophobic countries in the world. I would say they don't even consider us farangs fully human (absolutely nothing to do with age, as a previous poster suggested:it's a racial thing). And it's not from the top down, it permeates the whole of Thai society. A 3-year old has learned it already, when they point you out to their parents and say 5555 a farang. 

Back on the subject matter please: the original clickbait/provocation post asked for comments comparing Thailand with Vietnam 5 years from now... 

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, drbeach said:

Yes that's largely true but there are exceptions. Also, dual pricing is not well publicized everywhere so foreigners, especially tourists are often unaware of the practice. In Laos for example, in some places where I thought that dual pricing wasn't practiced, it actually is - what happens is a Lao person simply tells the ticket seller they are Lao (khoy pen kon Lao) and they get a 50% discount. Later I discovered this was printed behind the counter (in Lao, which I can read) to state that Lao citizens get a 50% discount. So rather than write out "khon Lao 10,000 Kip" they simply write: admission 20,000 Kip and then in words "Lao citizens get a 50% discount". Therefore, anyone looking for a different number don't see it. In Laos, they have their own numbers but they are used even more rarely than in Thailand, for some reason. Could be that the Communists decided to make it easier on the population just to use Arabic numbers and leave Lao numbers for historical purposes and advertising.

 

Perhaps Vietnam is similar in some places, you just have to look. I look for the word that means "foreigner" written in Vietnamese then I know there's dual pricing though it's true that at the majority of tourist attractions, dual pricing is no longer practiced. One well known exception that I know of is the Imperial palace in Hue. Definitely dual pricing there - I experienced it myself. Also, in general there are fewer tourist attractions of the type that one can find in Thailand, therefore there are fewer opportunities for the authorities to impose dual pricing.

Interesting what you say about Laos. While I speak Thai, which virtually all Laotians can understand, I can't read it, let alone Pasa Lao. I have a feeling that dual pricing and rip-offs have gone up in Laos. 20 years ago, Laotians were known for their exceptional honesty, not anymore. The opposite has happened in Vietnam :20 years ago, it was the rip-off capital of the world, now in many non-touristy places you are more likely to get a special discount than being ripped off. One huge exception is Hoi An, where the Vietnamese are still up to their old tricks of gouging tourists. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, drbeach said:

Yes that's largely true but there are exceptions. Also, dual pricing is not well publicized everywhere so foreigners, especially tourists are often unaware of the practice. In Laos for example, in some places where I thought that dual pricing wasn't practiced, it actually is - what happens is a Lao person simply tells the ticket seller they are Lao (khoy pen kon Lao) and they get a 50% discount. Later I discovered this was printed behind the counter (in Lao, which I can read) to state that Lao citizens get a 50% discount. So rather than write out "khon Lao 10,000 Kip" they simply write: admission 20,000 Kip and then in words "Lao citizens get a 50% discount". Therefore, anyone looking for a different number don't see it. In Laos, they have their own numbers but they are used even more rarely than in Thailand, for some reason. Could be that the Communists decided to make it easier on the population just to use Arabic numbers and leave Lao numbers for historical purposes and advertising.

 

Perhaps Vietnam is similar in some places, you just have to look. I look for the word that means "foreigner" written in Vietnamese then I know there's dual pricing though it's true that at the majority of tourist attractions, dual pricing is no longer practiced. One well known exception that I know of is the Imperial palace in Hue. Definitely dual pricing there - I experienced it myself. Also, in general there are fewer tourist attractions of the type that one can find in Thailand, therefore there are fewer opportunities for the authorities to impose dual pricing.

I have been in some tourist attractions and the prices are the same, it doesn´t matter if the sign is in English or Vietnamese. Also I saw at the cashier when I was waiting, that the Vietnamese in the queue before me paid for 2 adults the same I had to pay.

Edited by CNXexpat
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Cadbury said:

 Here are a few home facts about Vietnam from someone who knows. 

1. There is NO tax on income earned overseas. How would they know what you earn overseas? There is tax on income earned in Vietnam. 

 

https://home.kpmg/xx/en/home/insights/2011/12/vietnam-income-tax.html

 

Quote

Residents in Vietnam have to pay tax on their worldwide income at progressive tax rates. Therefore, salary earned from working abroad is taxable in Vietnam.

 

https://www.vietnam-briefing.com/news/personal-income-tax-exemptions-and-reductions.html/

Quote

Tax residents are subject to PIT on their worldwide employment income, regardless of where the income is paid or earned, at progressive rates from five percent to a maximum of 35 percent. Non-resident taxpayers are subject to PIT at a flat rate of 20 percent on their Vietnam-

 

http://taxsummaries.pwc.com/ID/Vietnam-Individual-Taxes-on-personal-income

Quote

Tax residents are subject to Vietnamese personal income tax (PIT) on their worldwide taxable income, wherever it is paid or received. Employment income is taxed on a progressive tax rates basis. Non-employment income is taxed at a variety of different rates.

 

https://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/global/Documents/Tax/dttl-tax-vietnamhighlights-2019.pdf

 

 

 

 

Really? How would they know isn't a legal argument. How would the US know or Germany about your worldwide income? Simply through tax information exchanges and double tax treaties with many countries: 

https://gws-offshore.com/tiea-tax-information-exchange-agreements/ 

https://www.ey.com/gl/en/services/tax/international-tax/alert--united-states-and-vietnam-sign-first-income-tax-treaty

http://www.oecd.org/tax/automatic-exchange/news/oecd-welcomes-viet-nams-commitment-to-implement-the-internationally-agreed-standards-to-tackle-tax-evasion-and-avoidance.htm

 

Quote

The Convention is the most comprehensive multilateral instrument available for a wide range of tax co-operation to tackle tax evasion and avoidance, and guarantees extensive safeguards for the protection of taxpayers' rights. The Convention was developed jointly by the OECD and the Council of Europe in 1988 and amended in 2010 to respond to the call by the G20 to align it to the international standard on exchange of information and to open it to all countries, thus ensuring that developing countries could benefit from the new more transparent environment. It is seen as the ideal instrument for swift implementation of the new Standard for Automatic Exchange of Financial Account Information in Tax Matters developed by the OECD and G20 countries as well as automatic exchange of country by country reports under the BEPS Project. Already 111 countries and jurisdictions have joined the Convention.

 

 

Just because someone is dodging taxes doesn't make it the correct thing to do, it's outright dangerous.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...