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BANGKOK 19 August 2019 09:06
Sarah123456

My english father in law

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On 8/1/2019 at 1:08 AM, Sarah123456 said:

Soalbundy this is for you would you say that about one of your parents he is not unconscious now but still very poorly dont need comments like your so I suggest you remove it 

whats the patients chances of recovery?

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On 8/1/2019 at 6:24 AM, Rhys said:

Use the resources of your family....all the best.

sorry if I sound heartless but anytime anybody has the slightest problem in Thailand they post in TV to ask for financial help how can we believe any of it, so I say nope.... start GoFundMe acct it solves everything

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A callous remark and responses removed.

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On 8/1/2019 at 9:01 AM, Gumballl said:

The family has spent so much on medical care that they cannot afford to buy frivolous things such as a period.

Never knew women had to purchase such things.

 

Doesn't matter how much is spent on medical care, there comes a point when the inevitable happens to all. Even millionaires and billionaires.

 

Wanting to preserve some-ones life is a natural and honourable thing. Yet that thought needs to be lessened at some point. A difficult thing to do, but you don't know how much unnecessary suffering your delay may unintentionally cause.

 

Hope you can find the strength to carry on.

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i have always felt and believed that people have a duty to die under such circumstances.

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10 hours ago, IraqRon said:

i have always felt and believed that people have a duty to die under such circumstances.

duty is the wrong word, nobody should be forced to die out of a sense of duty to the state or family. They should however be presented with the honest facts as gently as possible. In the end nature always wins. I saw a program on Youtube where an old American man was in hospital, cancer and stroke, he was discussing plans with his wife about going to their holiday home after release from hospital, the doctor then gently asked if they had plans for a hospice near that home. you could see reality suddenly hitting home and the slow blooming of acceptance the inevitable.

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Posted (edited)
On 8/1/2019 at 10:17 AM, colinneil said:

Sarah why did your husband not turn his father?

You speak about grade 5 bedsore, well i had 1 that was grade 5 ( i would post a photo, but is too disgusting for people to see ).

I spent 7 months in a government hospital here, and it was up to my wife to turn me, hospital staff never turned me.

Turning an unconscious or impaired patient at least every two hours, and having them on a "eggshell or air-mattress" is standard basic nursing care. The only reason pressure areas occur is incompetence 

Edited by RJRS1301
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Turning off what is keeping him alive is the last thing a Hospital here will do unless payment stops- he is income to them and they will be happy to see him suffering as long as the money is coming in. End of life should be helped along with as less pain and discomfort as possible, not prolonged for profit.

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