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BANGKOK 18 August 2019 15:57
banagan

Ceiling insulation, recommended for staying cool?

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Hi, I assumed adding 150cm thick ceiling insulation would help keep a condo cool, but not so sure after this 7 year old thread, http://bit.ly/2M6Vwbv (thought it best to start a new one)

 

So, I'm having an old condo renovated. Top floor, so about 5 feet from my ceiling to the condo ceiling. I'd like to keep the place cool and save on ac electric bills.

 

Should I install 150cm stay cool ceiling insulation? 

ฉนวนกันความร้อน-เอสซีจี-รุ่น-STAY-COOL-75-150-มม.-พรีเมี่ยม-1.jpg

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9 minutes ago, Artisi said:

 bear in mind it works in both directions - slows heat into the living space and slows heat getting back out. 

Yes, I've been reading up on that. Apparently you need to vent the attic space properly... not exactly sure how to achieve that on a condo. I can't go adding vents to the condo roof... any ideas? Maybe Homepro can offer suggestions?

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Read through CharlieH's previous thread, a lot more to ceiling insulation than I thought. I've still not clear on a few things, hope you guys can clear em up. My roof pics below.

1. I only need to lay the insulation on my ceiling? The roof above it is the condo roof (top floor)

2. The parts of the ceiling that is support beams, do I need to insulate that? If so, maybe 2 inch would fit... 

3. What's all this talk of fans, vents? Do people have fans blowing in the loft space? Or vents on the main roof?

4. I imagine Homepro do this all the time. Good idea to have them out to access? I believe they do that, right? I'm looking at close to 11k's worth insulation.

Thanks.

 

 

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The insulation and radiant barrier is a good start, but you might look at taping the insulation (per manufacturer instructions, depending on type, etc) to give yourself a bit of a vapor barrier.  The latent heat load (de-humidification) can really dominate the costs of comfort cooling. 

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Looks like you will want to do that sooner than later.  Doesn't seem to be much space above the hangers to do it after the ceiling installed.  (?)

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2 hours ago, tjo o tjim said:

The insulation and radiant barrier is a good start

There is no radiant barrier installed and it's a bit too late to do it now.

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3 hours ago, sometimewoodworker said:

There is no radiant barrier installed and it's a bit too late to do it now.

The insulation pictured has an integral radiant barrier by the looks of it. Getting a vapor barrier to be solid would be a significant challenge though. 

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Banagan, have you considered spray on insulation to the underside of the roof sheet,  3 advantages, ideal insulation, reduces the possibility of leaks, and good sound proofing. 

 

 

 

22 hours ago, banagan said:

Yes, I've been reading up on that. Apparently you need to vent the attic space properly... not exactly sure how to achieve that on a condo. I can't go adding vents to the condo roof... any ideas? Maybe Homepro can offer suggestions?

 

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, tjo o tjim said:

The insulation pictured has an integral radiant barrier by the looks of it. Getting a vapor barrier to be solid would be a significant challenge though. 

No it does not. As the installation will not get hot.

 

A radiant barrier reduces radiation transfer from a hot surface. This is governed by the second law of thermodynamics.

 

You are mistaken, the installation has a reflective barrier.

 

Like many people you seem to have mistaken the fact that silver (coated aluminium) foil can be used as a reflective barrier, though it is only really effective as a radiant barrier, in the case of that insulation its a reflective not radiant barrier.

 

The reason is that used as a reflective barrier it almost always has dust accumulation on its surface (it is usually horizontal) . Whereas used as a radiant barrier dust can't be deposited in more than an extremely light amount, since it is inverted and on the underside of the roof.

 

NB this is Thailand, hot outside cooler inside, not a theoretical arctic environment, thought even there the same problems are in effect.

 

here is a fun and accurate explanation 

 

 

 

Edited by sometimewoodworker
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