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rooster59

The week that was in Thailand news: The moaner on the bar stool is at home on the internet!

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, GarryP said:

Some have not a single positive thing to say about Thailand and yet they are still here.

I enjoyed the cheap and easily available sex when it was cheap.

Now I enjoy bringing up the kids resulting from the cheap and easily available sex.

I also still enjoy cycling and running in the jungle.

 

That's 4 positive things about Thailand, and 3 positive things which are still valid

Edited by BritManToo
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On 8/10/2019 at 8:35 AM, rooster59 said:

The reality is that a huge part of the problem is due to motorcycles and particularly young people without helmets riding them. And drink driving. Which is why the Thais - who, believe it or not can read and understand the surveys they undertake - are concentrating on these issues rather than attempting to raise driving standards across the board. That would be futile in comparison at this stage in the country's development.

Rooster I can agree with you on the bulk of your stances.

 

Above I quote you on the road death issue.

 

 

As I have replied in many posts concerning road safety, I do not believe that road laws or police enforcement is the root of the problem with road carnage.

 

You state that the Thai people are concentrating on young riders, motorcycles, and helmet law. Do you seriously believe that such "concentration" will yield any significant result immediately or in years to come?

 

My judgment is that Thai people are culturally conditioned to accept death too easily. They seem to be disinterested in protecting themselves, their families, or other people they encounter on the roads (and sidewalks!).

 

I simply cannot find any other explanation for their mass behavior as a people. Often times the simplest explanation for an anomaly like this is the correct one. There can be no doubt that this facet of their culture is peculiar to the global community; they simply have no rivals for this sanguinary distinction.

 

If preserving life, a strong Buddhist meme, was truly important to them they would not let underage children drive motorcycles stacked 3 deep without helmets, lights, or safe tires and brakes. Likewise they would not engage in the reckless and/or drunken behavior that is commonly seen on Thai roads every single day of every single year.

 

This issue confronts both citizens and visitors to Thailand on a daily basis and is quite literally a question of life and death.

 

I consider your long experience here and your deeper understanding of Thai culture to be valuable. I would appreciate your opinion on why my thesis is right or wrong.

 

If I am correct, then no amount of attention from private or government agencies will make any difference whatsoever. In that case we can all decide whether we wish to remain in a situation that is unlikely to change for decades to come, if ever.

 

While I hesitate to describe Thai culture as one intent on murder, it may well be one careless of death.

 

What say you?

 

I'm sure many others would appreciate an expansion of your thoughts on this relevant topic.

 

 

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Over the years I have watched things change, when many said they would never change.  Thais will change when they are good and ready and not when we want them to.  It is after all their country not ours.  It takes time to move people who are group oriented and reluctant to rock the boat or deviate from the path they find themselves on.  Without cheap alternative forms of safer transportation it is hard to make inroads into the motorcycle deaths.  People don't necessarily want to ride three or four on a bike but it is either that or stay home and go nowhere, for many.

 

I have no data to back it up, but my opinion is that Thais where I live tend to be superstitious and don't necessarily feel they have any control over what happens in life, unlike people in the West.  I don't see it as careless, but more to do with their belief in karma and a perceived lack of control over their destiny.  There is plenty of pain and anguish on display at local funerals so it is not they don't care or feel.  They are just more stoic and accepting of death because of the way they celebrate the end of life.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, RocketDog said:

Rooster I can agree with you on the bulk of your stances.

 

Above I quote you on the road death issue.

 

 

As I have replied in many posts concerning road safety, I do not believe that road laws or police enforcement is the root of the problem with road carnage.

 

You state that the Thai people are concentrating on young riders, motorcycles, and helmet law. Do you seriously believe that such "concentration" will yield any significant result immediately or in years to come?

 

My judgment is that Thai people are culturally conditioned to accept death too easily. They seem to be disinterested in protecting themselves, their families, or other people they encounter on the roads (and sidewalks!).

 

I simply cannot find any other explanation for their mass behavior as a people. Often times the simplest explanation for an anomaly like this is the correct one. There can be no doubt that this facet of their culture is peculiar to the global community; they simply have no rivals for this sanguinary distinction.

 

If preserving life, a strong Buddhist meme, was truly important to them they would not let underage children drive motorcycles stacked 3 deep without helmets, lights, or safe tires and brakes. Likewise they would not engage in the reckless and/or drunken behavior that is commonly seen on Thai roads every single day of every single year.

 

This issue confronts both citizens and visitors to Thailand on a daily basis and is quite literally a question of life and death.

 

I consider your long experience here and your deeper understanding of Thai culture to be valuable. I would appreciate your opinion on why my thesis is right or wrong.

 

If I am correct, then no amount of attention from private or government agencies will make any difference whatsoever. In that case we can all decide whether we wish to remain in a situation that is unlikely to change for decades to come, if ever.

 

While I hesitate to describe Thai culture as one intent on murder, it may well be one careless of death.

 

What say you?

 

I'm sure many others would appreciate an expansion of your thoughts on this relevant topic.

 

 

I am tempted to say that a lot of it comes from the fact that most act without consideration of the consequences, in all things.

Edited by overherebc
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1 hour ago, BritManToo said:

I enjoyed the cheap and easily available sex when it was cheap.

Now I enjoy bringing up the kids resulting from the cheap and easily available sex.

I also still enjoy cycling and running in the jungle.

 

That's 4 positive things about Thailand, and 3 positive things which are still valid

I also enjoyed exercising in Thailand over the years also. I am a runner. But, hacking and coughing from the massive amount of air pollution is a real turn off... The air pollution alone IMHO is enough to keep people from going to Thailand!

But, the rest of you list I agree with 100%... 🙂

 

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On ‎8‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 1:14 AM, from the home of CC said:

They seemed to never let go of the notion that things should be as it is back home. I'm glad this country doesn't fit into some preconceived mold, its one of the reasons I'm here.

One of my reasons too. Had LOS been the same as back home, what would have been the point of moving there? I enjoyed that it wasn't the same when it came to PC and attractive women, bars and beaches.

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16 hours ago, richard_smith237 said:

 

That was one of the points of the Op... That MANY posters complain for the sake of complaining without any real balance. 

Is having balance another way of saying that you are a fence-sitter with no real opinion.

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16 hours ago, garyk said:

Typical headline grabbing rant to get views.

As a guy that travels allot, I can safely say the bar stool rants have merit, so far as Thailand is concerned!

 

Keep reading the column.

 

It might help you get a better perspective on the kingdom.

 

Rooster

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16 hours ago, BritManToo said:

I enjoyed the cheap and easily available sex when it was cheap.

Now I enjoy bringing up the kids resulting from the cheap and easily available sex.

I also still enjoy cycling and running in the jungle.

 

That's 4 positive things about Thailand, and 3 positive things which are still valid

The internet has meant the price of sex in Thailand has come down, so I'm told. 

 

Rooster

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16 hours ago, RocketDog said:

My judgment is that Thai people are culturally conditioned to accept death too easily. They seem to be disinterested in protecting themselves, their families, or other people they encounter on the roads (and sidewalks!).

Whilst appreciating where these sentiments come from I have never accepted them myself. This along with other statements like "life is cheap" I have found to be untrue. Life is as valuable here as anywhere. 

 

You ask about whether concentrating on young people on motorcycles will have any effect on the carnage. Yes, I believe it will but it will depend on education ministry initiatives in schools and police enforcement. It can be done and I believe if the government finally accepts the devastating effect of all this on GDP - as they are showing signs of doing - then change may, slowly be effected over the next five/ten years. 

 

In response to your other reasoned observations I would add that I feel that the Thais are obsessed - despite some of the actions of their leaders - are obsessed with personal freedom. (Tai= free as it says on the tin!). But they take it further to mean freedom to break the law when it suits them. This makes them - to a closet anarchist like me - both lovable though a tad frustrating. As I frequently say, they can be their own worst enemy.

 

I hope you continue to enjoy the column and continue to post so eruditely on some of the issues that are raised. 

 

Rooster

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15 hours ago, villagefarang said:

Over the years I have watched things change, when many said they would never change.  Thais will change when they are good and ready and not when we want them to.  It is after all their country not ours.  It takes time to move people who are group oriented and reluctant to rock the boat or deviate from the path they find themselves on.  Without cheap alternative forms of safer transportation it is hard to make inroads into the motorcycle deaths.  People don't necessarily want to ride three or four on a bike but it is either that or stay home and go nowhere, for many.

 

I have no data to back it up, but my opinion is that Thais where I live tend to be superstitious and don't necessarily feel they have any control over what happens in life, unlike people in the West.  I don't see it as careless, but more to do with their belief in karma and a perceived lack of control over their destiny.  There is plenty of pain and anguish on display at local funerals so it is not they don't care or feel.  They are just more stoic and accepting of death because of the way they celebrate the end of life.

Excellent observations that generally mirror my own feelings.

 

Thanks for reading the column.

 

Rooster

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Very strange and haunting video.

When the West meets the East...the "life is cheap" scenario..

 

 

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sweeping generalizations rarely bear any fruit. One must strike a balance with accepting Thailand and the Thais for what they are and not being caught up completely in the mai pen laai, dont speak foul, save face, ignore problems that has led to stagnating economy, a military dictatorship, rampant corruption, nonexistence of middle class and abject poverty that plague Thailand. If one were to sweep all dissenters of the dissenters in a generalization it would be that "they are just virtue signalling farang straining for acceptance and devoid of the temerity to change things." Still the article I think draws distinction between objective observations and the "my country does this better brigade".  Some more balance would be good int he article and the way each of us views the country we call home.  Not to mention the greatest strengths of anything are usually related to the greatest weaknesses. This is very apparent in Thailand.  I like living in a country with less bureaucracy and red tape than Europe but lament the lack of structure this brings.  We all benefit from the fact that Thailand is less scrupulous, lacks middle class and awareness whilst we bemoan those same things. I am guilty of this, often stating how the corrupt policemen do nothing for crime prevention but am happy to pay an one the spot fine for breaking a red light when it suits me. Balance is key.....

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On 8/12/2019 at 9:32 PM, overherebc said:

I am tempted to say that a lot of it comes from the fact that most act without consideration of the consequences, in all things.

I agree. This is another observation

I've pondered at length and even questioned Thai friends about.

 It seems to stem from their refusal/negligence to consider the future, even the immediate future.

 

While I believe that I, and many westerners dwell too much on the future, not considering it at all clearly has a downside. The Thai "Mai kit mak" (don't think too much) can be taken too far.

 

I watched my Thai GF balance a glass jar on the edge of the kitchen counter instead of pushing it a few inches farther from the edge. I asked her to consider the consequences and simple ways to prevent them. She saw my point and admitted that she simply didn't think that way.

 

I don't believe that their brains are so different from anybody else's. Again, it is a cultural conditioning thing. So I must conclude that such things are not reversed by laws or posters or news headlines. It literally takes generations to alter.

 

I must make it clear that I am happy here, like the Thai attitude about many things, and have altered my own behavior in some cases because I believe they have a better approach to life.

 

The road carnage stands prominently above any other aspects of life here that bother me. I can 'live' with all the others, but maybe not with this issue. 😒

 

 

 

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