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Wife of Houston-area Navy veteran held in Thailand prison begs politicians for help

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3 hours ago, Mel52 said:


I very seriously doubt that the family is getting attention to the situation and even if he is convicted I seriously doubt he’ll be in prison for very long. I remember reading about an Australian member of the biker gang the Hell’s Angels who was convicted of murder here in Thailand and I believe he received a death sentence here in Thailand and guess what he was released and sent back to Australia after only 4 years. If a member of the Hell’s Angels biker gang can pretty much get away with murder in Thailand do you really think they’re going to put a United States Navy veteran in prison for a crime committed by the company he worked for especially if he knew nothing about it I very highly doubt it.

Maybe some brown envelope was passed to lower the punishment? 

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Military Veterans you put your asses on line for your country...

Yes your special and should be honored.

 

I don’t think any of us have all the information to judge either 

way...   Let’s see how it plays out.

 

Strange thing today ... Market was packed and women using woman and Men’s toilets... seriously I was huh? 

 

Enjoy your day...

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Posted (edited)

What, deeply, disturbs me in this part is the 'Navy veteran' bit, we've seen the same kind of so many times already, army, navy, airforce, US, UK, etc.!

What's the point? Does having been employed by military forces give one any kind of respectability or so (yes, I know, in Thailand it is, undeservedly, very much so)? It would be interesting to see statistics, especially from the US, about the percentage of the population locked up in jails for criminal offences, compared to the general population.

My 'guess', 'inspired' by, among others, when I was in the service then, with some security degree, the technical screening of information about the records of the individuals serving in the US armed forces in Europe. Erm, obviously to us then, not that many 'white lambs' in the flock...

Edited by bangrak

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6 hours ago, TGIR said:

Wrong.  He is a Veteran, not a public servant. Unfortunately, being a Veteran won't even get you a free cup of coffee, it is just a designation of something you "used" to be.  

 

vet·er·an

/ˈvedərən,ˈvetrən/

Learn to pronounce

noun

a person who has had long experience in a particular field.

synonyms:retired soldier; More

a person who has served in the military

 

So I'm a veteran of industry after 48 years.  Served my country in export oriented business all my life. I deserve a medal. 

Stop this circular back slapping nonsense.  He is ex services same as anyone else who served time. 

Only in America. 

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4 hours ago, Mel52 said:


Except he wasn’t driving a get away car in a bank robbery he was working for a company which unbeknownst to him might have been involved in financial crimes here in Thailand. I think the people who were scammed would want the people who were really responsible to be prosecuted not some dude who worked for them. This guy sounds like he was scammed as well and is just as much of a victim as the people who were scammed financially. If he was just hired to do commercials which apparently was the case then more than likely he couldn’t have known anything about it you really think the scammers are going to share that with him? Obviously not. But apparently some people on here conveniently ignore the facts and the obvious.

You don't know the facts.  Your post are all speculation and opinion,  as are everyone else's.  Let the single judge decide the facts. 

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4 hours ago, Mel52 said:


The guy left his job in the states where he actually ran his own company to go to China with his wife for her job working at a dance school I believe it was and in China he worked a few odd jobs and probably got tired of that as a professional and when he was offered what appeared to be a better job opportunity he probably just jumped at it probably without asking enough questions or doing enough research. But I can see that happening easily in this guys’s type of situation. And I actually have kept up with the story on the real news. How about don’t be so quick to judge someone who wasn’t involved in something that was obviously a scam until now in hindsight.

What was he a professional at previous to joining his wife in China? 

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1 hour ago, emptypockets said:

Keep those happy thoughts. 

If there were any guys in China involved and prosecuted it's highly likely they have been executed by now. China doesn't muck around with this sort of thing. 

This guy seems rather naieve and stupid,  which is not atypical for ex armed services personnel. 

If the United States wishes to get involved that is up to them.  Don't hold your breath though unless you like going blue in the face. 

You will eventually realise that the rest of the world could not give a toss if you are 'American'.  A lot of that is in your own minds.  Particularly those who have never left the US for travel outside the Armed Forces.

You are nothing special. 

 

China doesn't execute for fraud any more. Even for Government mispecuniation.

 

The crims get, ooohhh...maybe 30 years of stripey suntan.

 

Hey! That sounds familiar. 🙂

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17 hours ago, smedly said:

setting aside all the stupid nonsense posts so far on this thread -

 

it would be interesting to know what evidence Thai prosecution have on this guy that proves his guilt, just being hired by a "so called" company as a con tractor doesn't mean he knew or was involved in what they were doing - different matter if they have evidence showing he was actively involved in the scam and was in receipt of the criminal proceeds, guilty by association doesn't cut it

Agree completely.  My sense is that one of Thailand’s privileged class was burned badly by this scam and badly wants someone/anyone punished for it.  The issue, if I were the family, is whether this guy gets a fair trial.  He will not of course if those that were burned are willing to pay for revenge.  For what crime does anyone in Thailand get a 35 year sentence ... not even murder?  I think we all know it comes down to the relative power/money of the person you have pissed off.  Based on this, things look bad for this guy.  

 

I am left wondering, if this scam is such a big deal, why has Thailand not pursued extradition proceedings against the ring leaders?  Oh wait, the ring leaders are likely rich/connected, no need to think further.  It’s just convenient for everyone if they nail this poor guy to the wall.

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16 hours ago, Orac said:

Bit more here about it from last year - if he was naive enough to think he was doing nothing wrong he needs locking up for his own safety if nothing else.

 

https://www.nationthailand.com/national/30352744

 

Orac, 

thanks for finding this.  I remember the story from before but couldn’t find the original reference.  I totally agree with you comments!

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20 hours ago, soalbundy said:

I'm sure any partner would try to help but why all this "he's a navy veteran" What has that got to do with anything, he joined up of his own accord presumably but that was then, has nothing to do with this case. He will stand trial and he will have a chance to prove his innocence or the prosecutor will prove his guilt. This is Thailand not America.

You have obviously not experienced the way the courts work in Thailand if you think he has much chance of an even playing field. 

 

But your last sentence is right - just needs a little more explanation of what that means for a foreigner accused in Thailand and how he can defend himself.

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Did Keller believe he was an actor playing a role for a movie?  Or did he know he was pretending to be an executive for a (real) company?  My thoughts are, if he knew he was pretending to be an executive for a legit company that turned out to be a fraud, he is guilty.  The amount of punishment would be what's in question.  If he only received the $15,000 as he states, then maybe his punishment is (time served), which is the time he was jailed while awaiting trial.  If financial records reveal he received substantially more than what is claimed, one may believe he knew he was being paid for more than just acting and he would receive a harsher punishment.  This is my two cents, from a 22 year Navy Veteran who lived in Phuket/Pattaya/Chaing Rai for over 10 years.  No, being a veteran has nothing to do with this case!  Maybe U.S. officials have looked into this case and they have come to the conclusion that there is enough evidence to find him guilty.  

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13 hours ago, 4675636b596f75 said:
22 hours ago, Skallywag said:

Would not cost them anything in reality as all their salaries are paid by taxpayers 

 

In which world does this sentence make sense?

Working for the government means your salary is paid by taxpayers. 

Working for the government means you do not have to be concerned with profits and losses.

Some crazy spending by the U.S. federal government: $1 million bus stop in Virginia, $5 million on studying drinking habits of college students,  $136 million sponsoring a NASCAR driver to help recruitment into the national guard, which netted 0 recruits. The list goes on. 

 

So if someone in the U.S. government is given the job to help this guy, the money spent would come from the U.S. taxpayers, hence it would not cost "them" anything    

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Posted (edited)

Off topic posts have been removed. 

Edited by metisdead

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1 hour ago, Mel52 said:

 


EXACTLY! A lot of mentally challenged people on here to say it nicely keep posting all sorts of nonsense and they keep saying other nonsense such as “duhhhh it will be decided by the court” and they have no idea how the system works here. Even some of the biggest morons around here know that the justice system here isn’t exactly fair especially when dealing with foreigners. People are just posting so much nonsense it’s ridiculous I don’t even bother to read it anymore I just do what they do I hit the report button and it turns out that report button works pretty well for me as well. It’s pretty obvious this guy never should have even been arrested or charged with anything in the first place and I think that’s pretty obvious to everyone here who actually read the story and has at least kept up with it a little bit but I honestly don’t think they care about the facts they honestly literally just hate this guy and have already judged him because he’s an American and ex-Navy. I actually saw one guy post that being ex-Navy would “hurt his case” emoji38.pngemoji38.pngemoji38.png

 

You use words like "It’s pretty obvious" and "pretty obvious to everyone here"...personally, I don't see anything as obvious.

 

Is there something?

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