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Farmers are reluctant to stop using toxic weed killers

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9 hours ago, farmerjo said:

Where's all the stubble gone KS.

Forage crop or baled.

Nice looking crop.

This crop was cut by combine ,he cut the stalks at almost at ground  level ,this year being so dry the crop was not that tall,by the time it had been though the combine they was not a lot left.

Will take a closer shot  tomorrow .

The buyers a getting fussy over the moisture of the crop ,probable costing them money to bring it down to 15% to sell on.

One farmer near my was harvesting his crop I said how much a kg , first thing he said was depends on moisture he said this crop was about 25% and he will get about 6-6.50 baht/kg,lot a lot to be made on that.   

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5 minutes ago, kickstart said:

This crop was cut by combine ,he cut the stalks at almost at ground  level ,this year being so dry the crop was not that tall,by the time it had been though the combine they was not a lot left.

Will take a closer shot  tomorrow .

The buyers a getting fussy over the moisture of the crop ,probable costing them money to bring it down to 15% to sell on.

One farmer near my was harvesting his crop I said how much a kg , first thing he said was depends on moisture he said this crop was about 25% and he will get about 6-6.50 baht/kg,lot a lot to be made on that.   

No worries,i could see the short stalks but not much trash thinking it might have be done with a forage harvester.

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On 8/17/2019 at 2:41 PM, Paul Henry said:

Facts: Chlopyriphos is an organic phosphate and is an insecticide not a weedkiller. There is no conclusive evidence that glyphosate is harmfull to mammals. Infact many years of study by many countries show this ammino acid chemical is safe.Vested interest groups have made some claims with several USA courts awarding damages to cancer victims ( Two of them self proclaimed longterm smokers.) Thailand has Not carried out any trials that I am aware of to prove one way or the other on the mammalian toxicity of glyphosate.

Yes the bipyridial paraquat is highly toxic and kills many every year. Chlopyriphos has also been banned in many countries as it builds up in the fat of animals and can then be consumed by humans, few people die directly by using it according to the label.  

No bias?

"few people die directly by using it according to the label."

A reality  in Thailand?

A slight  diversion  in your sense of  reality then. The  Notre Dame gets damaged  by  fire  and  billionares  fund(apparently) restoration.

The Amazon Jungle is  currently  being  destroyed   by fire  and  not  one  billionare   gives  a dollar  or one  F... that the  last remnants  of the lungs of the world  are  being  destroyed.

There are  many aspects  to the  perception of  importance  in reality.

 

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14 hours ago, farmerjo said:

No worries,i could see the short stalks but not much trash thinking it might have be done with a forage harvester.

A better photo ,this crop was drilled about a month ago .

Dr T said in another thread about rapid decompose of plant organic matter  in tropical country's ,I think this is a good example ,not a lot of the original plant left .

Walking though this crop the leaves where very sticky ,aphids where heaving a feed ,the plant will get over it ,the owner will not spray anything .  

RIMG1245.JPG

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10 minutes ago, IsaanAussie said:

https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30378676

 

Wednesday's review may delay the ban on the three chemicals. The fat lady is yet to sing!

Common sense may prevail yet.

The Bumjab party lead by the health minister and sidekick Mannaya have tried to rush through policy with the advice from a greeny group trying to gain more market share for their beliefs.

Now the realisation is that the plan has more holes in it than a water tank shot by a thousand bullets.

Tariff barriers,factory closures,unemployment,a strengthening baht,no suitable replacements and subsides the government can't afford.

Also take into account the waiting period,rules,regulations and costs of a changeover to organic certification which you would be lucky to see a slight shift in that direction even with the ban,especially by farmers who occupy state land.

The ban has been driven from the worlds largest trading block,the EU from the outset.

Yet they continue to allow the use of glyphosate for farming until the next REVIEW in 2023.And according to their greeny advocates plans,synthetic pesticides(fertilizer) will not be phased out until 2035.

In Thailand we are talking about only a few select crops that are legal to use these chemicals on and should continue to be allowed until the EU sets the standard.

 

       

 

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1 hour ago, farmerjo said:

Common sense may prevail yet

It is not unusual that governments propose laws in the extreme to prompt public reaction. Always easier to back off a bit rather than try to increase the severity. As that article pointed out 75% of a large poll were against an immediate ban with no real alternatives. I think the government has got the message. 

Maybe they will introduce laws to ensure "trained" operators are mandatory as a first step whilst preparing for the future when alternatives are available and the world makes the transition. Have to wait for the results of Wednesday's meeting.

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Yes Tuesday will be interesting.

What makes me laugh is in the BP article the Biothai director is taking a backflip now saying the ban should be delayed.

His group sat on the 4 piece committee supposedly representing the farmers interests that put forward the proposed ban to NHSC. 

What a joke.

 

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Well for the first time in many years I am going to stand up and say "Hoped so!" good outcome.

 

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What peeved me is the suddenness of the proposed ban and the lack of an alternative product at a reasonable price.  Well,  they have more time now to get it Right.......but will they? 

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He is right by not committing to a statement.

Dammed if you do,dammed if you don't.

As long as there working on finding alternative's at a reasonable price,that is all they can do.

Not sure about the rest of Thailand,here won't be spraying till at least March so the stocks are going to take a while till exhausted.

 

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The stocks will be used up during the "implementation" phase of any new law. Enforcement could start at an agreed stock level.

The most effective ruling is to say "until an alternative is found" which offers industry the opportunity to find it and to prove it without government direct involvement or being accused of not caring for the safety of the public. Banned but if you are careful, OK, up to you!

As long as they don't offer any old stock of agent orange, even Monsanto could make an offering.

Amazing how political agriculture can get without considering the livelihoods of farmers.

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