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Farmers are reluctant to stop using toxic weed killers

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People may asked why i'm against the ban of roundup.
I have a tractor,i have many implements to work the soil and the time.
So what's the problem,why do i need the chemical.
I would say,input costs,soil type(wanting living soils),seasonal conditions and against burning every year.
The only farmers who will win out of the ban will be the palm oil growers.
 
 
 
 
  
A few idiot farmers have spoilt the soup for everyone here with their inappropriate use of those chemicals, especially glyphosate (the two other I think are relics and not needed anymore).

Some time ago here or in another topic I was talking about the educated western or probably even Thai farmer who use Glyphosate according to the indicated applications and dosage, then there will be no harm to the environment.

For example KS or FJ wrote they are using green manure, mulching / no till and minimal glyphosate to kill the cover crop.
I would say that is totally okay and there will be no glyphosate in the soil, groundwater or crops.

But then you have those other people who are thinking lot helps a lot or spraying glyphosate on bare soil, runoff land or other not permitted applications.

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1 hour ago, CLW said:

Glyphosate hardly used in vegetable farming so I would say your fear isn't justified.
What could be the result?
More burning in the mountains to clear hills for corn?
Thai conglomerates shifting cultivation of sugarcane and corn to neighbouring countries, which just shifts the problem of pesticides use and eventually more burning, which smoke sooner or later reaches Thailand?
More toxic herbicides in rice farming, where Thailand has been overtaken in yield per area from all other Asian countries since decades due to their inefficient farming methods and I blame also the inactive government for that.
Ever been to Vietnam and China with really sophisticated rice irrigation channels not to mention Japan where they perfected this art.

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Well that's me put in my place.

Glyphosat does indeed have an important place in vegetable farming.

Ever been to Isaan? It's FLAT. 

This doesn't change the fact that vegetables WILL get more expensive if Glyph can't be used. In Europe they reckon with up to 25% for some crops.

And oh -- it is hardly toxic at all properly used but don't let that interfere with your argument.

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Well that's me put in my place.
Glyphosat does indeed have an important place in vegetable farming.
Ever been to Isaan? It's FLAT. 
This doesn't change the fact that vegetables WILL get more expensive if Glyph can't be used. In Europe they reckon with up to 25% for some crops.
And oh -- it is hardly toxic at all properly used but don't let that interfere with your argument.
As I suggest, Glyphosate hardly used for vegetables. I can't upload the graph but here is the according link.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyphosate

From the German Wikipedia:
Glyphosate is a non-selective systemic broad spectrum herbicide (broad spectrum or total herbicide) that is absorbed through any green part of plants. Glyphosate is used in agriculture against monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous weeds in agriculture, vineyards and orchards, in the cultivation of ornamental plants, on meadows, pastures and lawns as well as in the forest.

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The chemical ban was reported again today in "that other paper". Seems all sides are digging in and calls have been made for the PM to direct the ban be imposed regardless. It appears the PM supports a transition to better solutions. To quote:

 

"Gen Prayut said he has always made it clear that he believes the use of the three chemicals must be reduced and eventually removed from the market. Today, the government is still preparing for the ban. It is up to the NHSC to devise measures to accommodate the ban of paraquat, glyphosate and chlorpyrifos, according to Gen Prayut."

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The chemical ban was reported again today in "that other paper". Seems all sides are digging in and calls have been made for the PM to direct the ban be imposed regardless. It appears the PM supports a transition to better solutions. To quote:
 
"Gen Prayut said he has always made it clear that he believes the use of the three chemicals must be reduced and eventually removed from the market. Today, the government is still preparing for the ban. It is up to the NHSC to devise measures to accommodate the ban of paraquat, glyphosate and chlorpyrifos, according to Gen Prayut."
Just today I was reading about strict measures not a total ban?

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There's something fishy going on.

A lot of sweeteners being offered by the government to the agri fields today.

Palm got there b10 although funny the finance ministry is being asked to pay for it.

Rubber subsides today

3.1 billion on <deleted> today which most involves water usage when its been a drought.

Like grab a brain,grow more corn when mr fall army worm has just arrived in town.

Also do people really think the corn hybrid seed producers will stick around and spend money on R&D if they can't sell other products in the market place.

Next thing after banning the chemicals,the climate change people who go hand in hand will be screaming blue murder with the increased c02 emissions put out by farmers,not to mention the air pollution from burning.Rant over.

Mr PM is out of town for tuesdays meeting but i hope the ban is phased out and not sudden after the meeting. 

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Just today I was reading about strict measures not a total ban?

 

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This is the news to the suggested stricter measures.

 

https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?url=https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1128556-strict-measures-on-using-three-toxic-pesticides-take-effect-on-oct-20/&share_tid=1128556&share_fid=29570&share_type=t

 

Strict measures on using three toxic pesticides take effect on Oct 20

 

In theory a very good idea and well thought out but knowing Thailand. Nah. Doesn't work here...

 

Same as traffic law enforcement or helmet law.

 

Again, I feel sorry for the few farmers who applied these chemicals according to the instructions from the manufacturer.

 

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I agree. A phased change is the only sensible way to go. Politicians are the same globally ensuring re-election is of importance to them, but I admire the Thai speed in this process compared with the all talk do nothing we get from Canberra. 

These chemicals aren't something new here or elsewhere and most of the "evidence" is based more on vested interest than scientific study. I am not a supporter of continuing the use of these products but recognise they work! 

Lets hope that a manufacturer of a "safe" alternative stands up and offers similar performance and cost.

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48 minutes ago, IsaanAussie said:

https://ocp.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/SLASHER-Flyer-plus-QA.pdf

 

This is a possible alternative herbicide approved for organic use in Australia. Sounds interesting

Thanks for bringing on board,is it registered to use here.

It maybe ok in conjuction with tillage.

My initial thoughts-

Multiple follow up sprays,it belongs to the corrosive family of acids.

Here is one review. 

 

Slasher Organic Weedkiller Reviews - ProductReview.com.au.html

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26 minutes ago, IsaanAussie said:

Relatively new on the market in Oz so I doubt here yet. I have asked them if at least some trials are possible. We will see if they are interested. Quick numbers based on their retail pricing would be about 300 baht per rai plus sprayer cost. So expensive against Roundup on face value.

300 baht sounds better,i worked it out for my sprayer at 1500 baht/rai

 

It says mix 5-7 litres with 100 litres of water,i use 60 litres of water per rai through my sprayer.$15 for 1 litre of concentrate,

That would be for the 1st pass and it's likely 3 passes will have to be made.

 

Edited by farmerjo
sorry for late edit.
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Just now, farmerjo said:

300 baht sounds better,i worked it out for my sprayer at 1500 baht/rai

As I said rough numbers. I am assuming using the same gear and technique as usual, hence the same total volume sprayed. Also assuming the $9-10 per litre commercial "retail" price if buying in 1000 litre IBC's. 

So a healthy amount of chalk and cheese difference in our numbers.

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