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Jumbo1968

Laser Treatment for Cateracts

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I have cataracts which I will at some stage need Laser Treatment, if I go to my GP in the UK I will be referred but from what I know there is a very long waiting list to have done in the UK and could be waiting for months.

Can anyone recommend a Hospital/Clinic in or around Pattaya where they have had Cataracts removed by Laser and what was the cost ?

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It is very safe to do laser treatment for cataract. The surgeon makes the corneal incision and opens the lens with the laser. The laser then softens the protein clumps, after which the ultrasound probe is used to further break down the cataracts so they can be suctioned out of the eye. After the treatment it is very necessary to take care of eyes and wear goggles daily. it is costly but it is best way to remove the cataract.

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4 hours ago, MargaretShackelford said:

It is very safe to do laser treatment for cataract. The surgeon makes the corneal incision and opens the lens with the laser. The laser then softens the protein clumps, after which the ultrasound probe is used to further break down the cataracts so they can be suctioned out of the eye. After the treatment it is very necessary to take care of eyes and wear goggles daily. it is costly but it is best way to remove the cataract.

How does this differ from the traditional system,  phacoemulsion, as Sheryl stated above, which uses ultrasound to perform basically the same procedure.  Seems to me that the laser is just something to assist the surgeon, not the patient

 

No matter how the cataract is removed you are either going to have to have wear corrective lenses or glasses since any of the cataract removal procedures will change the shape of your eyeball

 

At 71 I still don't need to use reading glasses and in consultation with my Primary Care physician I will not have my cataracts removed until such time as I can't drive at night due to the halo effect.  I am hoping that technology will get to the point where the cataracts can be emulsified without invasive surgery and changes to the curvature of the eyeball  
 

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Posted (edited)

I think they do femtosecond laser cataract surgery at Bumrungrad Bangkok. What I gleaned from my research is that femtosecond (in general) is better if your surgeon is not that great but if you have a good surgeon it's overkill (as yes it's much more expensive). 

 

Also femtosecond laser can not even be done in all cases.

 

In either method the cataract needs to be removed and then replaced with a implanted lens.

 

I need the surgery myself but have delayed it. 

I recall seeing a surgeon at Samitivej Sukhumvit Hospital that also works at Bumrungrad. He said in my case the femtosecond would be a waste of money. 

Edited by Jingthing
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7 minutes ago, Langsuan Man said:

How does this differ from the traditional system,  phacoemulsion, as Sheryl stated above, which uses ultrasound to perform basically the same procedure.  Seems to me that the laser is just something to assist the surgeon, not the patient

 

No matter how the cataract is removed you are either going to have to have wear corrective lenses or glasses since any of the cataract removal procedures will change the shape of your eyeball

 

At 71 I still don't need to use reading glasses and in consultation with my Primary Care physician I will not have my cataracts removed until such time as I can't drive at night due to the halo effect.  I am hoping that technology will get to the point where the cataracts can be emulsified without invasive surgery and changes to the curvature of the eyeball  
 

Not all people need glasses after particularly if you get the more complex multiple focus lens. Get a standard lens and most people will need reading glasses and maybe more depending on the results. 

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Just after posting the subject I spoke with my sister, her partner has had laser treatment for cataracts, one eye only.

He has not lost the sight in the eye for some reason and obviously is now reluctant to have the other eye done.

On speaking too the Consultant he said after treatment I would be able too see clearer and sharper but it wouldn’t improve my original prescription meaning I would still have too wear specs.

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13 minutes ago, Jingthing said:

Not all people need glasses after particularly if you get the more complex multiple focus lens. Get a standard lens and most people will need reading glasses and maybe more depending on the results. 

That's exactly why I am putting it off, right now , it's usually either or.  You either get the complex multiple focus lens implanted or you wear glasses.  I don't want either 

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I was advised to get the basic focus and was told that I would probably only need glasses for reading. Most people over 40 or 50 can use reading glasses anyway. Different cases different situations. Cataracts cloud the vision. Eventually glasses can't provide satisfactory vision as the cataracts worsen.

Sent from my Lenovo A7020a48 using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

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My  Mother had one done at 90 in the Uk privately £2400 if  you can  afford that, it was  very fast from diagnosis to being  done

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7 minutes ago, gunderhill said:

My  Mother had one done at 90 in the Uk privately £2400 if  you can  afford that, it was  very fast from diagnosis to being  done

If I had to go through the NHS system I think it would be several months before I would be treated.

Currently the cataracts are not affecting my eyesight but I have thought of going private eventually, £2400 seems cheap ? 

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4 hours ago, Jumbo1968 said:

If I had to go through the NHS system I think it would be several months before I would be treated.

It is similar for my sister in the USA with her HMO.  I've considered sponsoring a Thailand trip for her to have it done here.  If we do that, how long should she plan to stay post-op?  What kind of follow-up exams are necessary?

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Usual follow up is 1 day, 1 week then 1 month.

 

Could potentially have the one month follow up done back in US if everything checked OK at the one month mark.

 

Note the costs. Will be over USD $2000 per eye at most private hospitals hete and then thete is the airfare to consider.

 

Might want to see if thete is a provision to pay for out of network care, if so might be chesoer than coming here.

 

The reason there is a long wait is that cataract surgery is an elective procedure and no reason to rush. What is the problem with waiting a few months?

 

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20 hours ago, Sheryl said:

Usual follow up is 1 day, 1 week then 1 month.

Thanks.  So, normally, after a month she'd be okay to fly home?

 

20 hours ago, Sheryl said:

Note the costs. Will be over USD $2000 per eye at most private hospitals hete and then thete is the airfare to consider.

I'd gladly spend that money on her.  She's only going to inherit it anyway.  😉

 

20 hours ago, Sheryl said:

The reason there is a long wait is that cataract surgery is an elective procedure and no reason to rush. What is the problem with waiting a few months?

Her cataracts are *quite* bad.  She's stubborn and lazy (much like her brother) and has kept putting it off -- for years.  If I don't force her to do it, she probably never will get around to it.  I'm currently working to motivate her to start the process with her HMO.  Flying her over here would be a drastic Plan B.  Wherever she has it done, I want to be there to help her for the first day or two, so she's not alone.

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6 hours ago, wpcoe said:

Wherever she has it done, I want to be there to help her for the first day or two, so she's not alone.

This is really a very simple and safe procedure - even here in Thailand there is no must stay in hospital or be with someone push.  You only need to have transportation home from clinic (not good to drive with one eye).  But she should feel fine - just one eye covered with bandage until next day - and a plastic protector to wear at night.  Once bandage removed just normal eye drops.  Main thing is to have good sunglasses as once eye uncovered sun will be too bright without for a few months/year.  Colors will be amazing the first week (until your brain adjusts).  I visited shopping center on way home to buy the sunglasses. 

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