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Chikungunya virus has mutated offering greater risk, warns doctor

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Chikungunya virus has mutated offering greater risk, warns doctor

By The Nation

 

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Photo Courtesy of Dr Manoon Leechawengwongs FC (facebook.com/604030819763686/)

 

Dr Manoon Leechawengwongs, a respiratory and critical care specialist at Bangkok’s Vichaiyut Hospital, went online to warn Bangkok residents that the chikungunya virus, spread through the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito, has mutated allowing one mosquito to be the carrier of both chikungunya and dengue viruses.

 

He also pointed out that in the past 30 days, his hospital has treated 13 chikungunya patients compared to none last year. 

 

Posting the warning on his Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/604030819763686/), the doctor cited the case of a generally healthy 33-year-old Thai Bangkok resident, who suddenly developed a high fever, headache, muscle and joint pain as well as red eyes. Two days later she developed a rash and her white-blood cell count dropped to 1,900, the doctor said, adding that a lab test confirmed she had chikungunya. After being treated accordingly, she recovered within eight days. 

 

According to the Disease Control Department, as of August 14, a total of 6,289 people in 45 provinces had been infected by chikungunya virus or a ratio of 9.52 persons for every 100,000, which is the highest in five years. 

 

Most of the patients or 4,988 were in the South, followed by 1,008 in the North, 143 in the Central region and 78 in the Northeast. The southern provinces of Tak, Pattani, Phitsanulok, Surat Thani, and Songkhla were the worst hit.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30375159

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2019-08-21
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In all the times hang around Banglamphu i've never seen any mosquitoes. None in my room or walking or at night. I recently spent 10 days there. I never see any mossie in Bangkok.

Where are these people get bitten? In some garden or jungle area i guess.

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11 hours ago, Kay McDonnell said:

I am astonished he is declaring that after only 8 days the patient was well.  I have this along with many other people in Phuket.  it is at least 4 months (if you are lucky) but often 9 months to get better.  It is  horrendous

The period of  virulence is self limited but the after effects can last a long time! Mostly the  joint pain.

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I got Chikungunya virus when I was in East Africa. Although the condition cleared up within 10 days, some time later I got the first symptoms of terrible arthritis which my rhumatologist believes was triggered by the virus. This virus can give you arthritis and, if you are like me and have the right genetic disposition, it can give it to you for life in the form of a permanent autoimmune condition. It seemed to have also kicked off spondylitis (a condition of the spine). I was only able to hobble around in great pain on crutches.

 

It took two years to find the right mix of medication that agreed with me and had the appropriate effect. I now have to self-inject a biologic every two weeks plus tablets. The cost of meds for me is currently at about $18,000 per year (no, there is no insurance company that will cover this, at least that I am aware of). I am now able to walk around without any sticks but had to give up certain sports, such as tennis and to reduce alcohol intake to a minimum.

 

Having an autoimmune condition creates all sorts of problems as the meds are designed to suppress your over-active immune system. You have to stop meds if you have an operation or are injured. Some of the meds can cause fetal abnormalities (for fathers too). And don't start me on the side-effects!

 

All from one mosquito bite!

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14 hours ago, Don Chance said:

In all the times hang around Banglamphu i've never seen any mosquitoes. None in my room or walking or at night. I recently spent 10 days there. I never see any mossie in Bangkok.

Where are these people get bitten? In some garden or jungle area i guess.

10 days in your room is a long time..people normally get bitten on the arms or legs.

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1 minute ago, Proboscis said:

I got Chikungunya virus when I was in East Africa. Although the condition cleared up within 10 days, some time later I got the first symptoms of terrible arthritis which my rhumatologist believes was triggered by the virus. This virus can give you arthritis and, if you are like me and have the right genetic disposition, it can give it to you for life in the form of a permanent autoimmune condition. It seemed to have also kicked off spondylitis (a condition of the spine). I was only able to hobble around in great pain on crutches.

 

It took two years to find the right mix of medication that agreed with me and had the appropriate effect. I now have to self-inject a biologic every two weeks plus tablets. The cost of meds for me is currently at about $18,000 per year (no, there is no insurance company that will cover this, at least that I am aware of). I am now able to walk around without any sticks but had to give up certain sports, such as tennis and to reduce alcohol intake to a minimum.

 

Having an autoimmune condition creates all sorts of problems as the meds are designed to suppress your over-active immune system. You have to stop meds if you have an operation or are injured. Some of the meds can cause fetal abnormalities (for fathers too). And don't start me on the side-effects!

 

All from one mosquito bite!

..sorry for you.

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14 hours ago, Yom Valley said:

Get well soon!

All the best to you and the other affected people.

 

'My' dengue fever (and all the other bigger problems) started 3 weeks ago.

Today I'm almost fine.

 

Only advice: stay away from the mozzies, wherever you are...

(Chikungunya seems to be very similar to dengue.)

 

Do you remember getting bitten often?  Did you have the mossie in your room? Did you have AC?

Sometimes i see really small mossie, they don't seem very virulent, was it one of them?

I read it is 50 in 100,000 get dengue in Thailand, you must be really unlucky since most are under the age of 25 and students.

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28 minutes ago, Don Chance said:

Do you remember getting bitten often?  Did you have the mossie in your room? Did you have AC?

Sometimes i see really small mossie, they don't seem very virulent, was it one of them?

I read it is 50 in 100,000 get dengue in Thailand, you must be really unlucky since most are under the age of 25 and students.

The following says 'everything' - CDC / https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aedes_aegypti

 

  1. Although Aedes aegypti mosquitoes most commonly feed at dusk and dawn, indoors, in shady areas, or when the weather is cloudy, "they can bite and spread infection all year long and at any time of day."[7][8]
  2. Once a week, scrub off eggs sticking to wet containers, seal and/or discard them. The mosquitoes prefer to breed in areas of stagnant water, such as flower vases, uncovered barrels, buckets, and discarded tires, but the most dangerous areas are wet shower floors and toilet tanks, as they allow the mosquitos to breed in the residence. Research has shown that certain chemicals emanating from bacteria in water containers stimulate the female mosquitoes to lay their eggs. They are particularly motivated to lay eggs in water containers that have the correct amounts of specific fatty acids associated with bacteria involved in the degradation of leaves and other organic matter in water. The chemicals associated with the microbial stew are far more stimulating to discerning female mosquitoes than plain or filtered water in which the bacteria once lived.[9]
  3. Wear long-sleeved clothing and long trousers when outdoors during the day and evening.
  4. Use mosquito netting over the bed if the bedroom is not air conditioned or screened, and for additional protection, treat the mosquito netting with the insecticide permethrin.

 

Living in a small village there are always mosquitoes around.

You can not avoid being stung, especially if you're working/sitting/sleeping in the garden.

Mosquito lotion and spirals will help. A fan and good clothing too.

In the house usually no mosquitoes, AC or not, mai pen rai. Of course windows and door screened.

 

'Sometimes i see really small mossie, they don't seem very virulent, was it one of them?'

'Our' mozzies are really small (less than 2 mm), but also more than 10 mm.

And they are fast, not easy to catch. - Forget the picture, they're very small.

image.png.86e71d004671076bdb8fa4322eda7dd0.pngimage.png.0e125be1a637f68b939997b459ec1905.png

 

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15 hours ago, Yom Valley said:

Get well soon!

All the best to you and the other affected people.

 

'My' dengue fever (and all the other bigger problems) started 3 weeks ago.

Today I'm almost fine.

 

Only advice: stay away from the mozzies, wherever you are...

(Chikungunya seems to be very similar to dengue.)

 

Only advice: stay away from the mozzies, wherever you are

Where I live in Samui its IMPOSSIBLE I am bit by moskitoes let's say 10 times every single day 365 days a year...😊

My motor bike is parked under my house, taking it to start is a matter of... probably less than 30 seconds, if I do not have long pants and long sleeves I pick up 2/3 bites

It is completely wild on several Rai behind my house, does it come from there?

At the end of the day when the sun falls going in the garden is impossible without being surrounded in a few seconds.

On my terrace if I put two anti-mosquitoes that smoke it's a lot better,
on the same terrace I also put a really powerful ventilator in the radius of which they can hardly fly. 

When I want to stay in the garden I put what I call my "sua gan young" canvas trousers a long-sleeved shirt and rubber boots, on the hands and face spray antimoustics, forget it is impossible!

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23 hours ago, Don Chance said:

In all the times hang around Banglamphu i've never seen any mosquitoes. None in my room or walking or at night. I recently spent 10 days there. I never see any mossie in Bangkok.

Where are these people get bitten? In some garden or jungle area i guess.

The wife's sister and her two kids live around the Victory Monument area. All admitted at the same time for dengue fever last year.

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Posted (edited)

Chikunguyna has mutated to Turkungunya….beware. Duckungunya ...coming soon.

If Emugunya or Ostrishgunya happens we are stuffed.

 

 

Seriously use a DEET repellent spray. Check around house condo for any containers holding the tiniest amount of water and drain/dispose of them. The mozzies live around the house. Take away their breeding sites wherever possible.

Edited by emptypockets
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