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To US expats - Registration with Medicare at age 65

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On 9/11/2019 at 11:06 AM, AAArdvark said:

Can you share where you found that information?  It directly contradicts what I have been told by Medicare.  Can it be that you are talking about the ability to sign up outside of the normal enrollment period?

 

I did find this from Medicare but it means you have to have been living overseas at the time you you turned 65.  But if your were 65 prior to moving overseas it does not apply.

 

"If you turned 65 while living overseas and you didn’t sign up for Medicare when you were first eligible, you may qualify for a Special Enrollment Period that starts when you return to the U.S. and lasts three months. You generally don’t need to pay a late-enrollment penalty if you enroll during this three-month period."

 

Yea, but that option is only under "special conditions."  See full details at the link below (which is probably where you got your partial quote above).  I include a partial quote from the link below...see link for full details.

 

https://www.medicareconsumerguide.com/moving-to-us-and-enrolling-in-medicare

 

Quote

Special Enrollment Periods

If you turned 65 while living overseas and you didn’t sign up for Medicare when you were first eligible, you may qualify for a Special Enrollment Period that starts when you return to the U.S. and lasts three months. You generally don’t need to pay a late-enrollment penalty if you enroll during this three-month period.

You may also qualify for a Special Enrollment Period if you were living overseas and covered by an employer-based health plan. You can sign up for Medicare Part A and/or Part B anytime as long as either you or your spouse is working and covered through health coverage based on current employment. If your employment or group coverage ends, your Special Enrollment Period begins after you or your spouse stops working or the group health insurance based on current employment ends (whichever occurs first). This Special Enrollment Period lasts for eight months. Note that COBRA and employer retirement health plans don’t typically qualify you for a Special Enrollment Period because this coverage isn’t based on current employment.

You might also be eligible for a Special Enrollment Period if you were a volunteer serving outside the U.S. for at least 12 months on behalf of a tax-exempt organization and had health insurance coverage for the duration of the service. Your six-month Special Enrollment Period begins when one of the following happens:

  • Your volunteer service outside of the U.S. ends.
  • The volunteer organization loses its tax-exempt status.
  • Your health plan that was providing coverage overseas ends.

Usually, you don’t pay a late-enrollment penalty if you sign up during a Special Enrollment Period.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Pib said:

 

Yea, but that option is only under "special conditions."  See full details at the link below (which is probably where you got your partial quote above).  I include a partial quote from the link below...see link for full details.

 

https://www.medicareconsumerguide.com/moving-to-us-and-enrolling-in-medicare

 

 

Sorry, I don't see "special conditions".  I just see "special enrollment" period.  I still believe that the point is that if you are living overseas and then turn 65, it is possible to return to the US later and enroll without penalties.  If you turned 65 prior to moving overseas and did not sign up prior to moving, penalties appear to be unavoidable.  Or am I missing something else? 

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20 minutes ago, AAArdvark said:

Sorry, I don't see "special conditions".  I just see "special enrollment" period.  I still believe that the point is that if you are living overseas and then turn 65, it is possible to return to the US later and enroll without penalties.  If you turned 65 prior to moving overseas and did not sign up prior to moving, penalties appear to be unavoidable.  Or am I missing something else? 

Sure, it's possible, but only if meeting one of the few special conditions which the great majority of people will not meet.   Like you have just been living in Thailand on your retirement visa/extension of stay that is not one of the special conditions allowed.

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7 hours ago, Pib said:

Sure, it's possible, but only if meeting one of the few special conditions which the great majority of people will not meet.   Like you have just been living in Thailand on your retirement visa/extension of stay that is not one of the special conditions allowed.

That seems proper.  Just being out of country would be a huge loophole.  Otherwise many people would or could just go hang out in some other country and then come back at their convenience and not have to pay a penalty that millions of others would have to pay that had stayed in the USA but did not sign up. 

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4 hours ago, gk10002000 said:

That seems proper.  Just being out of country would be a huge loophole.  Otherwise many people would or could just go hang out in some other country and then come back at their convenience and not have to pay a penalty that millions of others would have to pay that had stayed in the USA but did not sign up. 

There are two categories.  If you lived in the US beyond the age of 65 and did not sign up, you would pay the penalty.   However, if you left the US at age say 63 and moved to Thailand, you are allowed to sign up without penalty after returning to the US. 

Twice, the term "special conditions" was mentioned but I have been unable to find a mention of "special conditions".  This could be accurate but I cannot find the "special condition" information anywhere.

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18 minutes ago, AAArdvark said:

There are two categories.  If you lived in the US beyond the age of 65 and did not sign up, you would pay the penalty.   However, if you left the US at age say 63 and moved to Thailand, you are allowed to sign up without penalty after returning to the US. 

Twice, the term "special conditions" was mentioned but I have been unable to find a mention of "special conditions".  This could be accurate but I cannot find the "special condition" information anywhere.

Mr PIB quoted the special conditions in his post above

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17 hours ago, AAArdvark said:

Sorry, I don't see "special conditions".  I just see "special enrollment" period.  I still believe that the point is that if you are living overseas and then turn 65, it is possible to return to the US later and enroll without penalties.  If you turned 65 prior to moving overseas and did not sign up prior to moving, penalties appear to be unavoidable.  Or am I missing something else? 

 

The conditions/qualifications/requirements (whatever you want to call it) to enroll during the special enrollment period usually without a Medicare late enrollment penalty are listed in the link and partial quote I gave earlier.  Here they are again. 

 

But i think you will see about the only condition/qualification/requirement that would apply for most folks, like a person living in Thailand on a retirement or marriage visa/extension of stay, would to be the qualification/condition of already being covered by an employer-based medical program or the spouse's medical plan providing group-coverage for the person.   Now when drilling deeper (not covered below) a "self-employed" person might also meet the qualification requirements if they can prove medical coverage and usually tax returns also have to be provided to prove they are paying required medicare taxes.

 

https://www.medicareconsumerguide.com/moving-to-us-and-enrolling-in-medicare

 

Quote

Special Enrollment Periods

If you turned 65 while living overseas and you didn’t sign up for Medicare when you were first eligible, you may qualify for a Special Enrollment Period that starts when you return to the U.S. and lasts three months. You generally don’t need to pay a late-enrollment penalty if you enroll during this three-month period.

 

You may also qualify for a Special Enrollment Period if you were living overseas and covered by an employer-based health plan. You can sign up for Medicare Part A and/or Part B anytime as long as either you or your spouse is working and covered through health coverage based on current employment. If your employment or group coverage ends, your Special Enrollment Period begins after you or your spouse stops working or the group health insurance based on current employment ends (whichever occurs first). This Special Enrollment Period lasts for eight months. Note that COBRA and employer retirement health plans don’t typically qualify you for a Special Enrollment Period because this coverage isn’t based on current employment.

 

You might also be eligible for a Special Enrollment Period if you were a volunteer serving outside the U.S. for at least 12 months on behalf of a tax-exempt organization and had health insurance coverage for the duration of the service. Your six-month Special Enrollment Period begins when one of the following happens:

  • Your volunteer service outside of the U.S. ends.
  • The volunteer organization loses its tax-exempt status.
  • Your health plan that was providing coverage overseas ends.

Usually, you don’t pay a late-enrollment penalty if you sign up during a Special Enrollment Period

 

 

Edited by Pib
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4 hours ago, Pib said:

 

The conditions/qualifications/requirements (whatever you want to call it) to enroll during the special enrollment period usually without a Medicare late enrollment penalty are listed in the link and partial quote I gave earlier.  Here they are again. 

 

But i think you will see about the only condition/qualification/requirement that would apply for most folks, like a person living in Thailand on a retirement or marriage visa/extension of stay, would to be the qualification/condition of already being covered by an employer-based medical program or the spouse's medical plan providing group-coverage for the person.   Now when drilling deeper (not covered below) a "self-employed" person might also meet the qualification requirements if they can prove medical coverage and usually tax returns also have to be provided to prove they are paying required medicare taxes.

 

https://www.medicareconsumerguide.com/moving-to-us-and-enrolling-in-medicare

 

 

I think that we will need to agree to disagree.  There are special conditions that apply to people who resided in the US at the time they turned 65 and then moved overseas.  However, I still see no special conditions that apply to people who resided overseas at the time of turning 65.  That rule appears to be totally separate. 

"If you turned 65 while living overseas and you didn’t sign up for Medicare when you were first eligible, you may qualify for a Special Enrollment Period that starts when you return to the U.S. and lasts three months. You generally don’t need to pay a late-enrollment penalty if you enroll during this three-month period."

Special enrollment period not special conditions.

Edited by AAArdvark

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On 9/12/2019 at 10:43 PM, AAArdvark said:

I think that we will need to agree to disagree.  There are special conditions that apply to people who resided in the US at the time they turned 65 and then moved overseas.  However, I still see no special conditions that apply to people who resided overseas at the time of turning 65.  That rule appears to be totally separate. 

"If you turned 65 while living overseas and you didn’t sign up for Medicare when you were first eligible, you may qualify for a Special Enrollment Period that starts when you return to the U.S. and lasts three months. You generally don’t need to pay a late-enrollment penalty if you enroll during this three-month period."

Special enrollment period not special conditions.

There is no way the SSA will leave such an easy escape for people not to register late and not to pay penalty, just by leaving the USA and coming back later.  Thousands upon thousands would do that.   I believe Mr Pib has relayed the most accurate information.  If you have doubts, of course you should check directly with the SSA and see if you can get firm written confirmation and explanation that a person of 63 can leave then come back after 65 and join without any late signup penalty and without having to do anything special.  If you are wrong in your understanding and proceed. you may not be happy when you come back

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On 9/9/2019 at 5:43 AM, cmarshall said:

Wrong in every particular.  It's only Part B that has the 10% penalty if you sign up later.  Expats can and do sign up for Part B.  For every other part we are not eligible, i.e. we can only buy it if we fraudulently and foolishly claim to reside in the US.  

 

Are you thinking any Medicare benefits are available  to a US citizen living outside the USA?

 

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