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Iran says sacking of Bolton won't lead to talks with U.S.

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Iran says sacking of Bolton won't lead to talks with U.S.

 

2019-09-11T083421Z_1_LYNXNPEF8A0LE_RTROPTP_4_IRAN-NUCLEAR-USA.JPG

FILE PHOTO: Iranian President Hassan Rouhani delivers a speech during the Inauguration ceremony for National Action on Housing Construction Scheme in Tehran, Iran August 27, 2019. Official Presidential website/Handout via REUTERS

 

DUBAI (Reuters) - The resignation of White House National Security Adviser John Bolton, a hawk on Iran, will not lead to talks between Washington and Tehran, Iran said on Wednesday.

 

President Hassan Rouhani urged the United States to end its policy of "maximum pressure" on his country, and said Tehran would cut its commitments to a 2015 nuclear deal further if necessary, state TV reported.

 

Last year, the United States pulled out of the nuclear deal, under which Iran agreed to curbs on its atomic programme in return for access to world trade.

 

Washington has since imposed what the administration calls a policy of "maximum pressure", including sanctions aimed at halting all Iranian oil exports.

 

Iran has responded with a series of steps to reduce its compliance with the nuclear deal, alhtough it says it still aims to keep it in place.

 

Trump has suggested he would be willing to hold talks with Iran to reach a new deal. Iran has long said talks are impossible unless Washington lifts its sanctions first.

 

Bolton, a hardliner who held senior positions in the George W. Bush administration, left his position on Tuesday. Trump tweeted that he had fired him after rejecting some of his advice.

 

"The departure of U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton from President Donald Trump's administration will not push Iran to reconsider talking with the U.S.," state news agency IRNA quoted Tehran's United Nations envoy Majid Takhteravanchi as saying.

 

He added there was no room for talks with the United States while sanctions against Iran remain in place, IRNA said.

 

Rouhani, a pragmatist who won two landslide elections in Iran on promises to open it up to the world, repeated previous Iranian demands that Washington relax its policies.

 

"The United States should understand that militancy has no profit, and must abandon its policy of maximum pressure on Iran," he was quoted as saying.

 

"Iran's commitments to the nuclear deal are proportional to other parties and we will take further steps if necessary."

 

(Writing by Parisa Hafezi; Editing by Peter Graff)

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2019-09-11

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Well, Bolton is out, a new war monger will be in anytime soon. 

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I will bet that if trump was sacked dialogue would start rite up!

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18 hours ago, webfact said:

Trump has suggested he would be willing to hold talks with Iran to reach a new deal.

Given trump’s propensity to cancel or unilaterally to withdraw from deals the USA has negotiated, who would trust any deal he is involved with?

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This may of may not be true. Talks with Iran could be quite productive. Whether or not it will happen with this administration, or the next one which comes into power in 16 months, after Trump has been booted to the curb, remains to be seen. But one thing is for sure. The world is a far, far safer place, without Blindfold Bolton at the helm of the NSA. He belongs in exile. He is an extremist, and a war monger, and there is no place for a man like that in politics. I am no fan of Donald Trump. But not listening to Bolton's advice, and firing him was smart, and I am thankful he was smart enough to figure out how much trouble that man was, and just how deep and hateful his ideology was. 

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Its was a bad deal, 

3 hours ago, spidermike007 said:

This may of may not be true. Talks with Iran could be quite productive. Whether or not it will happen with this administration, or the next one which comes into power in 16 months, after Trump has been booted to the curb, remains to be seen. But one thing is for sure. The world is a far, far safer place, without Blindfold Bolton at the helm of the NSA. He belongs in exile. He is an extremist, and a war monger, and there is no place for a man like that in politics. I am no fan of Donald Trump. But not listening to Bolton's advice, and firing him was smart, and I am thankful he was smart enough to figure out how much trouble that man was, and just how deep and hateful his ideology was. 

Who is gonna do the booting you.....lmao The Socialist Democratic Party hasn't a change in hell.... Trump 2020

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23 hours ago, Bluespunk said:

Given trump’s propensity to cancel or unilaterally to withdraw from deals the USA has negotiated, who would trust any deal he is involved with?

 

Wouldn't know about "trust", but those with limited options might have to contend and deal with him anyway.

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Just now, Morch said:

 

Wouldn't know about "trust", but those with limited options might have to contend and deal with him anyway.

After the taliban fiasco I doubt Iran will. 

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42 minutes ago, Bluespunk said:

After the taliban fiasco I doubt Iran will. 

 

Issues with the Taliban negotiations were messed up also due to the Taliban's actions and unreliability. I kinda doubt Iran's leadership operates on a simplistic level dominating many of the related comments and posts on this forum. And as said, they don't have a whole lot of great, realistic choices. So they may not, understandably, like or trust Trump, negotiating (or appearing to negotiate) may serve their interests. It would be safe to assume that there are more than one school of thought about this among the Iranian decision makers.

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10 minutes ago, Morch said:

 

Issues with the Taliban negotiations were messed up also due to the Taliban's actions and unreliability. I kinda doubt Iran's leadership operates on a simplistic level dominating many of the related comments and posts on this forum. And as said, they don't have a whole lot of great, realistic choices. So they may not, understandably, like or trust Trump, negotiating (or appearing to negotiate) may serve their interests. It would be safe to assume that there are more than one school of thought about this among the Iranian decision makers.

You might be right and if so great. No one wants to see nuclear proliferation. 

 

Problem I see is trump claimed he cancelled the “peace treaty” because of an attack the taliban had made clear would and did continue during any negotiations. 

 

I doubt Iran will have drawn any confidence about the reliability of dealing with such a person. Considering the mindset of Iran’s clerical elite, I’m not sure they would risk being exposed to a similar scenario. 

 

I could be wrong (and won’t be upset if I am), but I’m not holding my breath on negotiations beginning any time soon. 

 

However, never say never I guess. 

Edited by Bluespunk

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4 minutes ago, Bluespunk said:

Problem I see is trump claimed he cancelled the “peace treaty” because of an attack the taliban had made clear would and did continue during any negotiations. 

 

I doubt Iran will have drawn any confidence about the reliability of dealing with such a person. Considering the mindset of Iran’s clerical elite, I’m not sure they would risk being exposed to a similar scenario. 

 

I could be wrong (and won’t be upset if I am), but I’m not holding my breath on negotiations beginning any time soon. 

 

He already cancelled (as in unilaterally withdraw) from the so-called Iran Deal. And, other than that, quite a few other instances demonstrating more or less similar behavior. So I doubt that the Taliban case makes a whole lot of a difference as to how Iran's leadership sees Trump. There was no need of further proof, as it were.

 

That said, the Iranian regime faces issues on a different scale than the Taliban's leadership. For the likes of the Taliban, not dealing with Trump implies an ongoing situation which they can live with. The USA will not do more unto them, and the efforts invested seems to be dwindling. With Iran, the situation can be aggravated, and the regime got far more to lose (on a national and personal level).

 

It would be instructive to recall how things went with NK.

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Here's what Trump said at a news conference on July 30, 2018

“I’m ready to meet anytime they want to,” Trump added. “No preconditions. If they want to meet, we’ll meet.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-lashed-out-at-the-media-for-reporting-he-would-meet-with-iran-with-no-conditions-hes-said-as-much-on-camera-twice/2019/09/16/f71a98e2-d86d-11e9-bfb1-849887369476_story.html?arc404=true

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