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Mobile company employee stole 10 million baht from customers in credit card data fraud

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Mobile company employee stole 10 million baht from customers in credit card data fraud

 

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Picture: Daily News

 

A Thai man who worked on the counter for two well known mobile phone operators stole the credit card details of customers and helped himself to riches in an elaborate fraud. 

 

He bought foreign goods which he sold online and purchased a house and several cars on the proceeds. 

 

Sathit Janpho, 29, - a man from Uttaradit who got a degree in computers at a Bangkok university - was arrested on Tuesday outside Central Rama II west of Bangkok. 

 

Taken into evidence were a large quantity of shoes, designer bags and expensive watches that had been purchased on Amazon and Ebay and other platforms. 

 

Also seized was a two million baht house in the Rama II area, a 2.5 million baht Mini Cooper, and Honda and  Toyota vehicles worth a further 2.4 million. 

 

Economic Crime Suppression police were called in after many complaints from customers of mobile phone operators. They said that the method used by Sathit to cover his tracks was designed to make him difficult to trace.

 

At his work he would steal the credit card numbers, expiry dates and CVC three digit codes from customers. He would then order goods from abroad online. 

 

These were delivered to a bogus address and would then be returned to the distributor. Sathit then arranged with a motorcycle taxi rider to go to the distributor to present fake documents to claim the goods.

 

He was thus never seen in person.

 

The goods were then sold on Facebook and elsewhere. 

 

Sathit admitted the fraud saying that he was employed by one operator but was sacked. But he got another job at a new phone company where he had been for the last three or four months. 

 

In total he had been stealing credit card details for the last three years and had grown rich on the proceeds. 

 

Police advised customers never to let credit cards out of their sight and to cover the CVC code with a sticker. In addition customers should sign up for bank alerts when their credit card is used to help stop them becoming victims of credit card fraud. 

 

Source: Daily News

 

 

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-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2019-09-12
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Scumbag.

 

No. Dumb scumbag!

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Same, I never thought about it before, im putting a small sticker on it right now. 

 

Further, seems to me that it's easy enough to use credit cards fraudulently, and with the fast rise of instant funds transfer using internet banking (even across countries) and instant SMS to advise customers of all transactions and from what I read security is fairly good, so I'm wondering whether credit card usage will wain substantially. 

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A true Thai success story of financial well-being and ingenuity... The man is to be congratulated.... right after he gets out of prison.

 

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Give him a cabinet role they need some "elaborate" fraudsters all the ones they have now are so easy to spot these days your career awaits in politics not phones🤔

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4 hours ago, dddave said:

Actually a useful suggestion to just cover the CVC code...That had never occurred to me.  I know it by heart so it doesn't need to be visible.  Without that, very difficult to use the card online.

It's a useless idea. You have already provided your CVC code to mobile phone operators and online shopping sites. What online shopping sites must do is to authenticate payments via TAC (Transaction Authorisation Code) that are sent as SMS from banks to cardholders. Problem is, just like the US banks still haven't migrated totally to chip-based credit cards, many US online shopping sites also still have not used TACs. The US is now very backward in many ways.

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By the way, anyone can confirm if Shopee and Lazada in Thailand use TACs or not in authenticating payments? Have never done any online shopping there so I don't know. I can confirm that both Shopee and Lazada in Malaysia use TACs.

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22 minutes ago, Selatan said:

It's a useless idea. You have already provided your CVC code to mobile phone operators and online shopping sites. What online shopping sites must do is to authenticate payments via TAC (Transaction Authorisation Code) that are sent as SMS from banks to cardholders. Problem is, just like the US banks still haven't migrated totally to chip-based credit cards, many US online shopping sites also still have not used TACs. The US is now very backward in many ways.

The Bank Of Thailand has instructed all Thai banks the transition to chip & pin cards must be completed by the end of December this year. After that, all old Thai cards without a chip will be invalid. That includes credit cards, debit cards and ATM cards.

However, I saw a recent article saying the banks had requested a short extension, as there were still some customers not aware of the need to replace their cards. It seemed to be an extension of a few weeks, IIRC.

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