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rooster59

The week that was in Thailand news: The Lord Giveth and the Lord Taketh Away

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" the 90s and the naughties" 

Good one. 

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3 hours ago, rooster59 said:

Health issues were also to the fore this week. I applaud moves by the government to tax sugary drinks

Rooster, herein is a copy of an very recent article authored by Dr.Harriet Hall, MD, a retired family physician and Air Force Colonel living in Puyallup, WA. She writes about alternative medicine, pseudoscience, quackery, and critical thinking.

If you recall, only a few years ago it was announced to the world in general that sugary drinks should not be given to children as it would make them hyperactive, which like many other things that were announced incorrectly, also went by the boards (or is that boreds (?, just joking) even though there is some truth attached to it.  The same claims have been made concerning other foods and beverages  and over time many have been debunked.  An early example is that peanut butter causes cancer, but now it is recommended that a couple of tablespoons a day are considered healthy.

 

Aspartame has been demonized in a concerted campaign by scaremongers, epitomized by the book Sweet Poison. It has been accused of causing headaches, seizures, Alzheimer’s, cancer, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, birth defects, tinnitus, memory loss, and all kinds of other problems. It doesn’t cause any of those things. Hundreds of studies have been published that examined and dismissed those claims. Aspartame has been evaluated far more extensively than any other food additive. It is safe for everyone except the few people with the genetic disorder phenylketonuria.

No, You Don’t Need to Stop Drinking Diet Sodas

The recent study only showed a modest correlation with dementia and stroke. Even the lead author of the study has said it does not constitute a reason to avoid diet sodas. Its findings have not been confirmed by other studies, and the findings only showed correlation, not causation. More importantly:

  1. There is no evidence that if you stop drinking diet sodas, your risk of stroke or dementia will decrease.
  2. There is good reason to believe that switching from diet sodas to sugar-sweetened drinks will result in worse health outcomes.

There are a number of artificial sweeteners on the market. There is no credible evidence that any of them are harmful. There is good evidence that high sugar intake is harmful.

The moral of the story: diet sodas are not dangerous, but reading headlines can be dangerous. Media reports of scientific studies, not just headlines, often give the wrong impression. They put a slant on results to make them more newsworthy. They tend to make preliminary research sound like definitive proof.

'nuf sed

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Yep great words of wisdom thanks again. 

Yes, sugar is the big no-no and the only food cancer feeds on. See David Noakes for more info. 

Time for another (sugar-free) cuppa. 👍

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17 hours ago, rooster59 said:

.........I was lucky to survive many close calls due to poor decisions and mistaken assumptions.

Yes indeed! The maxim of Occum's Razor can come into play here.

Occum was a 12th century Franciscan friar and he came up with the theory later named Occum's Razor:

 

.........if multiple explanations for something exist then the one requiring the least number of assumptions is most likely the correct one. 

For example:

A man has sent several text messages to his wife over the course of a day, and she has not responded.
Of possible explanations.....

a) her phone ran out of battery, or

b) she is maliciously ignoring him in revenge for an error on his part that he cannot remember,

 

explanation "a" is more likely.

 

https://examples.yourdictionary.com/examples-of-occam-s-razor.html

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18 hours ago, rooster59 said:

It's far better to take a deep breath and relax. It's good for one's health and may even make you appear less of a fool when it comes to interpreting the vagaries of Thai ways. This columnist has found that the less I overreact the better I feel and ultimately the more correct I might turn out to be in the long run.

It's funny, I was just rereading this after a considerable (and private) family event occurred last night. I think I overreacted and now my own words have reminded me not to be such a stupid idiot, smell the roses and wait until things pan out. 

 

Learning never stops. 

 

Rooster

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Thanks Rooster. A great article. You are so right about waiting it out before reacting. It took me a couple of years first to de stress from UK, then another couple to do it again to get to the right speed required here. My BP is almost at normal levels now. 

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“In retrospect, I am very nearly as sharp as I pretend to be.”
― Lyndsay Faye

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Rooster you’ve done it again.  Bang on.  I humbly offer my own version of a caution against overreaction:  ‘things are seldom as good - or as bad - as they first appear.”

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Rooster says "wait to react" and other wise advice..

then goes on to criticise many things Thai as absurd and idiotic.

lol

couldnt read about it?

you just did

lol

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