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ThePioneer

large air bubbles rising from return lines

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I have an in ground pool with Zodiac Tri salt water chlorinator, Hayward 1.5 Hp super pump II and Hayward S310T2 filter. I have a vertical mounted check valve between pump outlet and filter inlet, and a closed tap on the filter waste pipe.

I checked the check valve and it's working properly.

 

When I finish a filter cycle a few large air bubbles will rise from the return line and render the chlorinator cell housing almost empty. When the filter cycle stops there is no air under the pump lid.

 

The chlorinator cell housing is installed right above where the return lines go into the ground, and pump house is at same level as pool and right at the pool.

 

I will let the pump run for another 1 minute or even 30 seconds and the cell housing will be air free and stay like that indefinitely.

 

I do not see any air bubbles under the pump lid or in the cell housing at any time, though during the filter cycle I can hear water flow in the return lines below the cell housing.

 

The pump draws water from 3 feeds simultaneously, all using 2 inch tubing. I have had tried a check valve on the outlet pipe of the filter, but that would not make any difference.

 

Any suggestion what could be the cause?

 

 

 

 

Edited by ThePioneer

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I have an in ground pool with Zodiac Tri salt water chlorinator, Hayward 1.5 Hp super pump II and Hayward S310T2 filter. I have a vertical mounted check valve between pump outlet and filter inlet, and a closed tap on the filter waste pipe.

I checked the check valve and it's working properly.
 
When I finish a filter cycle a few large air bubbles will rise from the return line and render the chlorinator cell housing almost empty. When the filter cycle stops there is no air under the pump lid.
 
The chlorinator cell housing is installed right above where the return lines go into the ground, and pump house is at same level as pool and right at the pool.
 
I will let the pump run for another 1 minute or even 30 seconds and the cell housing will be air free and stay like that indefinitely.
 
I do not see any air bubbles under the pump lid or in the cell housing at any time, though during the filter cycle I can hear water flow in the return lines below the cell housing.
 
The pump draws water from 3 feeds simultaneously, all using 2 inch tubing. I have had tried a check valve on the outlet pipe of the filter, but that would not make any difference.
 
Any suggestion what could be the cause?
 
 
 
 
Can you add a picture of your piping, pump, filter and chlorinator setup?

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3 hours ago, carlyai said:

Can you add a picture of your piping, pump, filter and chlorinator setup?

Sent from my SM-J700F using Tapatalk
 

Not sure what you want to achieve by looking at pipes, since nothing has changed for the past 7 years, and it started only in the past few weeks

 

 

IMG_20190916_094056.jpg

IMG_20190916_094157.jpg

IMG_20190916_094210.jpg

Pump house.jpg

IMG_20190916_094107.jpg

IMG_20190916_094303.jpg

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Just checking: from the filter the pipe work goes to the chlorinator then returnes to the pool?

My pool is always filtering for 3 hours in the morning and 3 hours in the afternoon on a time switch. I take it off automatic on Sundays to clean the pool.

Sorry I don't understand about your filter cycle.

The more information we add may help someone suggest what the problem is.


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Air leaking into the top of the pump filter housing?

 

Unlikely if there is no evidence of water leaking out the other way (and potentially leaving salt deposits on the floor). Still worth giving the rubber seal a thin coating of silica gel to ensure an airtight fit

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Check valve fittings can some times suck air in without any water being leaked.

Alternatvely you could have a broken pipe?

 

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1 hour ago, Bagwain said:

Check valve fittings can some times suck air in without any water being leaked.

Alternatvely you could have a broken pipe?

 

The TVF notification system seemingly also has air bubbles, as it disables itself after the first notification LOL<

 

I would think that if there was a broken pipe or valve fitting sucking air, I would see either a water leak or in the latter case air bubbles under the pump lid or the clear cell housing. Correct or not?

 

How to check if a fitting or joint sucks air?

 

Take note also, the air bubble rises from the pipe that goes directly to the pool, not from the filter side

Edited by ThePioneer

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Sorry that I'm a bit thick, but is this correct? When the automatic timer turns off your pump, you get bubbles in the chlorinator coming from the return pool pipe. If you then manually start your pump (still with filter selected on your filter) for 1 min then stop your pump the bubbles disappear and don't return?

If this is correct, do you see those bubbles come out your return pipe into the pool?



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8 minutes ago, carlyai said:

Sorry that I'm a bit thick, but is this correct? When the automatic timer turns off your pump, you get bubbles in the chlorinator coming from the return pool pipe. If you then manually start your pump (still with filter selected on your filter) for 1 min then stop your pump the bubbles disappear and don't return?

If this is correct, do you see those bubbles come out your return pipe into the pool?



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yes

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yes
If there is only one return pipe, and the chlorinator bubbles are coming from the pipe, I think it could indicates a broken pipe, like the other poster stated.

If you get to the stage where you think that's all it must be, you could try something radical like: 1: dig up the dirt near the return and see if it's wet.
2. If you have a vacuum return line, make a temporary connection from the chlorinator to this line and see what happens. 3. break the pipe from the chlorinator to the pool and install a temp. hose into the pool and see what happens.

Somehow (to me) it doesn't all add up. Sorry, haven't been much help.



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As Bagwain has said you first port off call should be the non return valve  ideally you need to remove it completely and  clean it checking for any tiny bits of grit etc ( remember to note the direction of flow when reassembling it, if necessary  put your own flow arrow on it)

You also seem to have a few double union valves check that they are tight DO NOT over tighten.

Unfortunatly the stems on these valves can wear and can either leak water or draw air in.

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As Bagwain has said you first port off call should be the non return valve  ideally you need to remove it completely and  clean it checking for any tiny bits of grit etc ( remember to note the direction of flow when reassembling it, if necessary  put your own flow arrow on it)
You also seem to have a few double union valves check that they are tight DO NOT over tighten.
Unfortunatly the stems on these valves can wear and can either leak water or draw air in.
But the OP said the bubles come in from the pool return.

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On 9/16/2019 at 9:55 AM, ThePioneer said:

Not sure what you want to achieve by looking at pipes, since nothing has changed for the past 7 years, and it started only in the past few weeks

 

 

IMG_20190916_094056.jpg

IMG_20190916_094157.jpg

IMG_20190916_094210.jpg

Pump house.jpg

IMG_20190916_094107.jpg

IMG_20190916_094303.jpg

Highest probability would (definitely) be a leak. Which muppet did that installation?

 

Chasing leaks isn't easy. Particularly when it's a vacuum problem.

 

Check the compression seals first (because that's the easiest). After that just redo the whole thing. It'll be quicker and cheaper.

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13 minutes ago, alacrity said:

Which muppet did that installation?

 

The installation wasn't done by any muppet.

 

How would you do in a limited space with 3 pumps an air blower and a 28" filter.

 

answers on a postcard.

 

By the way, nobody has answered my question yet. If there was a vacuum leak wouldn't it be visible in the clear cell housing during filter cycle, because that is the very last stage before the water goes back to the pool?

Edited by ThePioneer

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8 minutes ago, ThePioneer said:

The installation wasn't done by any muppet.

 

How would you do in a limited space with 3 pumps an air blower and a 28" filter.

 

answers on a postcard.

 

By the way, nobody has answered my question yet. If there was a vacuum leak wouldn't it be visible in the clear cell housing during filter cycle, because that is the very last stage before the water goes back to the pool?

So it was a particular muppet then! Why use PTFE tape on a professional installation? Best description of yours is an abortion in a bucket.

 

Answer to your enquiry should be yes but depends on things such as flow rate and how good your eyes are. Not forgetting the level of ingress.

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