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Local community turns garbage into gold

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Local community turns garbage into gold

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PATTAYA:--aan Nern Rodfai community in North Pattaya is leading the push to protect the environment and preserve natural resources through a new trash recycling drive.

 

The community is being championed as a prototype for waste management principles and through public education and awareness campaigns, concrete changes have been witnessed in the way people are now disposing of their unwanted household products. Four separately marked types of rubbish bins have been placed in locations around the community and citizens are encouraged to spend a few extra minutes each day to sort their garbage before disposing of it.

 

Garbage can be classified as compostable or biodegradable waste, recyclable products, such as glass and plastic bottles, tin cans etc., general waste which is non-compostable (plastic bags, foam containers), and hazardous waste, for example expired batteries and flammable or poisonous substances.

 

Read more: https://www.pattayamail.com/featured/local-community-turns-garbage-into-gold-264836

-- PATTAYA MAIL 2019-09-23--

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Could be like my village "that too hard we get rubbish collectors to come one extra day a week to take away excess" now have  three collections a week when if recycling was introduced would only need one collection, but that not Hi-so"s on the hill that too much work, lazy F£££ing Thais

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I sort my rubbish into separate bags; recyclables & the rest.  They just get tossed in the cart together.

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4 hours ago, mikebell said:

I sort my rubbish into separate bags; recyclables & the rest.  They just get tossed in the cart together.

I sorted mine but it didn't stop the scavengers going through my bin and ripping apart my bin bags. Despite me giving them the recyclable stuff directly and telling them there will never be any in the bin! Now the bin is kept behind the gate!

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We don't have rubbish collection. We burn the plastic bags and sell plastic bottles, glass and metal at the local recycle place. Food waste is composted.

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On 9/23/2019 at 2:23 PM, Hank Gunn said:

A great idea but sadly I don't think that idea would come to fruition. I live in lower Isaan and the soil here is very poor. Everyone here has been brainwashed into thinking that you need pesticides and fertilizers (i.e. "better living through chemistry") to grow their rice. Every Sat. and Sun. when muay Thai is on, the ads for these chemicals air every commercial break, like beer and shaving commercials in the US during NFL and baseball games. Additionally, I'm sure the large chemical companies will actively discourage any alternatives to their products and it's the owners of those companies who this government (and most others in the past) really report to.

 

My wife, who lived in the US with me for 10 years, learned about composting and natural farming by using the internet (YouTube, Facebook groups, etc.). She's tried to convince her three sisters and their husbands, along with others in the village and they just refuse to listen, even when confronted with the reminder that their ancestors all grew their rice and other vegetable for centuries, with no chemicals. When my wife grew a successful crop of corn, she was initially teased about the small cob sizes and taunted with comments like, "there'll be no kernels and it probably won't taste good". (It was a unique mix of blue and yellow corn that she got seeds for from a Facebook group.) When people tasted it, they all loved it; even asked if they could buy some. (It was all given away to family and a few close neighbors.) But my wife's comments about just using manure and rice hay went right through everybody's ears and they continue their prolific use of chemicals to this day.

 

I think it will take at least a couple/few more generations before people here look to alternatives like composting. (On a positive note, my wife is mentoring one of her nephews who loves gardening and he really listens and follows through on a lot of her advice. So who knows.)

Thai farmers need to get their heads out of their backsides.

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1 hour ago, jacko45k said:

I sorted mine but it didn't stop the scavengers going through my bin and ripping apart my bin bags. Despite me giving them the recyclable stuff directly and telling them there will never be any in the bin! Now the bin is kept behind the gate!

I  have a  shoot  to  kill  policy, my bins are  fine😂 if  only I could rid  myself of  the corpses  as  easily!

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5 minutes ago, grollies said:

Thai farmers need to get their heads out of their backsides.

Their leaders  could  supply all the fertiliser  just by opening their  mouths

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It would be really nice if many followed this example!

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15 hours ago, grollies said:
On 9/23/2019 at 2:23 PM, Hank Gunn said:

A great idea but sadly I don't think that idea would come to fruition. I live in lower Isaan and the soil here is very poor. Everyone here has been brainwashed into thinking that you need pesticides and fertilizers (i.e. "better living through chemistry") to grow their rice. Every Sat. and Sun. when muay Thai is on, the ads for these chemicals air every commercial break, like beer and shaving commercials in the US during NFL and baseball games. Additionally, I'm sure the large chemical companies will actively discourage any alternatives to their products and it's the owners of those companies who this government (and most others in the past) really report to.

 

My wife, who lived in the US with me for 10 years, learned about composting and natural farming by using the internet (YouTube, Facebook groups, etc.). She's tried to convince her three sisters and their husbands, along with others in the village and they just refuse to listen, even when confronted with the reminder that their ancestors all grew their rice and other vegetable for centuries, with no chemicals. When my wife grew a successful crop of corn, she was initially teased about the small cob sizes and taunted with comments like, "there'll be no kernels and it probably won't taste good". (It was a unique mix of blue and yellow corn that she got seeds for from a Facebook group.) When people tasted it, they all loved it; even asked if they could buy some. (It was all given away to family and a few close neighbors.) But my wife's comments about just using manure and rice hay went right through everybody's ears and they continue their prolific use of chemicals to this day.

 

I think it will take at least a couple/few more generations before people here look to alternatives like composting. (On a positive note, my wife is mentoring one of her nephews who loves gardening and he really listens and follows through on a lot of her advice. So who knows.)

Thai farmers need to get their heads out of their backsides.

Ha, ha. I mostly agree with that sentiment but in a way, they can't be helped. They are after all just a product of their environment; basically serfs being told what to do and imbibed with a sort of collectivist, nationalism in an educational system that discourages independent, critical thinking skills.

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