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ratcatcher

Waterproof, rubberised paint.

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This may not be the correct forum, but I know there are many practical, knowledgeable members that may just know the answer.

My wife was given a small Thai style boat, about 5 metres long. The hull is in good shape and I have patched, filled and sanded it. 

The inside of the hull is a bit of a mess and I am wondering if a rubberised paint that is quite thick, can be used to coat the entire inside surface. There is no major wood rot.

In Canada years ago I used a rubberized paint rolled on to a sundeck, would something like that possibly be available here, also I want to paint the hull with several coats of waterproof paint. Is this best purchased from a shop close to a marina or boatyard, or is it available at places like Thai Watsadu or Home Pro. Any help much appreciated

 

1296847648_Boat92319.thumb.jpg.475fd5b4c53a53d4942e551fe5e34391.jpg

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I'd fibreglass it if you are looking to waterproof the inside.

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1 hour ago, ratcatcher said:

In Canada years ago I used a rubberized paint rolled on to a sundeck, would something like that possibly be available here, also I want to paint the hull with several coats of waterproof paint. Is this best purchased from a shop close to a marina or boatyard, or is it available at places like Thai Watsadu or Home Pro. Any help much appreciated

There are at least 2 that I know of available from Global House, DoHome, Thai Watsadu etc.

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1 hour ago, grollies said:

I'd fibreglass it if you are looking to waterproof the inside.

Thanks for that grollies. It may be the second choice as the boat will be more decorative than functional.

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1 hour ago, sometimewoodworker said:

There are at least 2 that I know of available from Global House, DoHome, Thai Watsadu etc.

P4113139.thumb.JPG.b699b5657588d43fa2e11241d833c98b.JPGIMG_4128.thumb.JPG.e43585ee477bbdb7f54a64b03279a51e.JPG

 

Thanks a lot, this is more what I am looking for, Flintkote.

However, Waterproofing
Typical applications will include concrete roofs, asbestos cement roof, exposed metal roofs, rejuvenation of asphalt roof, retaining walls, external concrete walls, above-grade floor slabs, bathrooms, kitchens, balconies and planter boxes.

Do you think the wooden inside of the boat will be a suitable surface? It says the product is easily applied by brush, among other methods, and is flexible. 

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9 minutes ago, ratcatcher said:

Thanks a lot, this is more what I am looking for, Flintkote.

However, Waterproofing
Typical applications will include concrete roofs, asbestos cement roof, exposed metal roofs, rejuvenation of asphalt roof, retaining walls, external concrete walls, above-grade floor slabs, bathrooms, kitchens, balconies and planter boxes.

Do you think the wooden inside of the boat will be a suitable surface? It says the product is easily applied by brush, among other methods, and is flexible. 

A tiling/construction waterproof membrane won’t work if applied to the inside of the boat, it’s designed to work like a pool liner, to stop water getting out.

Water trying to get in (negative hydrostatic pressure “rising damp”) will cause it to delaminate from the timber.

 

There are some epoxys you could use, but I’m not sure how they would cope with the timber plank joints, I think the traditional western treatment was tar/pitch ?

 

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29 minutes ago, HighPriority said:

A tiling/construction waterproof membrane won’t work if applied to the inside of the boat, it’s designed to work like a pool liner, to stop water getting out.

Water trying to get in (negative hydrostatic pressure “rising damp”) will cause it to delaminate from the timber.

 

There are some epoxys you could use, but I’m not sure how they would cope with the timber plank joints, I think the traditional western treatment was tar/pitch ?

 

That's very good information. Much appreciated. Do you have any suggestions as to what might work in this situation?

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The op is asking how toseal the inside of the hull, not the underside which he says is in good condition.

Yes i agree the outside was generally done in pitch and finished with yacht varnish.

I see no reason why the rubberised coatings should not be ok for the inside as long as he remembers if it rains its going to stay inside the boat.

 

I have tried a bunch of sealants on my pond bottom and leaking gutters and the only one that worked for me is a Sika roofseal plus 800bt for 4kg.

On an expanding and contracting aluzinc gutter each day, its coping well with elastometric properties. You will need to line the hull will fibreglass scrim to strengthen it.

TOA do an identical product.

All the rest are very inferior Sista, BesBond, D100, lanko and do not have rubberised qualities.

 

Warning though...if you tear it or decide to pull on a raised edge, the whole lot will come off like a sheet of polythene.

Great for cleaning the brushes though.

IMG_20190801_105550.jpg

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2 hours ago, ratcatcher said:

Thanks a lot, this is more what I am looking for, Flintkote.

However, Waterproofing
Typical applications will include concrete roofs, asbestos cement roof, exposed metal roofs, rejuvenation of asphalt roof, retaining walls, external concrete walls, above-grade floor slabs, bathrooms, kitchens, balconies and planter boxes.

Do you think the wooden inside of the boat will be a suitable surface? It says the product is easily applied by brush, among other methods, and is flexible. 

The outside of the boat would be where I would put it. Virtually nothing is going to work on the inside apart from possibly fibreglass. 

 

Yes it is is easy to apply with a brush and can be thinned with water.

 

 

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