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Nok Air plane to come under FAA inspection

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Nok Air plane to come under FAA inspection

By The Nation

 

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The Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand (CAAT) has clarified that of all the Thai airlines, only "Nok Air" has been subjected to an FAA inspection, concerning a Boeing 737 aircraft of the carrier while Thai Lion pulls through as all of its aircraft have less than ten-thousand flight cycles.

 

The US National Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an airworthy directive, effective October 3, for the inspection of Boeing 737-600, -700, -700, -700, -900, and - 900ER as cracks had been found on the left and right sides of the fuselage structure near the wings. 

 

In a move to boost confidence of passengers, The Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand (CAAT) has provided details of the FAA directive.

 

1. Aircraft that have reached more than 30,000 flight cycles (1 FC means 1 take-down flight) must be checked by October 10, 2019.

 

2. Aircraft that have reached 22,600 - 29,999 flight cycles must also be inspected by October 10. 

 

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In addition, CAAT has examined the flight data of all Thai airlines.

 

1. Thai Lion Air has 30 Boeing 737 aircraft - 19 Boeing 737-900ER and 11 Boeing 737-800. The plane that have the highest Flight Cycles (FC) of 15,949 is a Boeing 737-900ER while the rest have lower cycles than specified in the FAA directive. 

 

2. Nok Air has 14 aircraft, including Boeing 737 and Boeing 737-800 aircraft. Of its fleet, the HS-DBO must be checked and verified by the FAA by October 10 2019 as it has reached 30,565 flight cycles. The remaining 13 will also be checked by October 10 if their flight cycles exceed 22,600. CAAT will cooperate with Nok Air in this regard. 

 

Wuthiphum Chulangkul, Chief Executive Officer of Nok Airlines Public Company Limited, said the carrier has a fleet of 22 aircraft - 14 Boeing 737-800 and 8 Q400s- with only one plane that has more than 30,000 flight cycles. Nok Air will conduct an inspection of the plane by October 10 in line with the requirements of the FAA and CAAT.

 

Thai Lion Air fleet has 11 Boeing 737-800 and 19 Boeing 737-900 aircraft. These planes with less than five years of service, all have less than 10,000 flight cycles and will not be affected by the FAA directive, said Thawan Thienthong, engineering director of the carrier.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30377302

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2019-10-11

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What is the purpose of the diagram, page filler?

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Can anyone explain why this information is released on 11 October. after the inspections have to be completed?

Would it not be wise to inspect the whole fleet of specified plane for what is a known fault?  Maybe include the inspection as part of regular maintenance? 

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51 minutes ago, legend49 said:

What is the purpose of the diagram, page filler?

Showing where "fuselage structure near the wings" is maybe? :dry:

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Nok Air has a long history of industrial disputes with first its pilots and then its engineers especially the ones that service the Bombardiers.

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3 hours ago, Pib said:

It's Federal Aviation Administration; not National...

Well I guess you have understood that obviously the FAA is the US national administration in charge of aviation. Isn't it?

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10 minutes ago, TomyumFarangSe said:

Well I guess you have understood that obviously the FAA is the US national administration in charge of aviation. Isn't it?

Yeap...just assisting the NationThailand newspaper with its acronym skills.

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But wasn't the it FAA who were happy to see the 737-Max fly? And weren't Boeing staff involved in the FAA? Which is why the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is insisting on doing the airworthiness checks for themselves.

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I've flown on HS-DBO before. Luckily it didn't crack up with me on board. Kudos to the FAA for watching out for me (and all of us).

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4 hours ago, George Aylesham said:

But wasn't the it FAA who were happy to see the 737-Max fly? And weren't Boeing staff involved in the FAA? Which is why the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is insisting on doing the airworthiness checks for themselves.

Boeing and the FAA is like candy floss and children

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22 hours ago, webfact said:

In a move to boost confidence of passengers, The Civil Aviation Authority of Thailand (CAAT) has provided details of the FAA directive.

I had little confidence before.. now it's zero !

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On 10/11/2019 at 2:55 PM, Chang_paarp said:

Can anyone explain why this information is released on 11 October. after the inspections have to be completed?

Would it not be wise to inspect the whole fleet of specified plane for what is a known fault?  Maybe include the inspection as part of regular maintenance? 

No, because the fault that was discovered in the pickle forks of the 737 NG is only required after 22,600 cycles, that is to be done within 1 year at the scheduled maintenance interval, only planes with over 30,000 cycles are required to be inspected within 1 week of the FAA directive.

 

The pickle forks were designed to be a lifetime part or at least 90,000 cycles.

 

Doing the kind of inspection you suggest early will produce a "no cracks found" result that is why Lion Air has no planes to be inspected.

 

There is also the fact that there are a lot of 737NG aircraft that have significantly exceed the 30,000 cycle trigger point that have had routine disassembly and rebuilding (a normal process during a planes life) and at that time all structures are checked for cracks and stress deformation, no cracking of the pickle forks has been found in those planes.

 

Yes it will be part of regular maintenance until the cause (quite possibly a batch of aluminium that was outside specifications) has been identified and then the aircraft that had those parts fitted will  almost certainly have them replaced.

Edited by sometimewoodworker

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