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DanFromHawaii

American Electronics that will work in Thailand

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I know the difference between American 120V 60Khz electricity and Thai 220V 50Khz electricity. So, are there any categories of electronics will safely run in Thailand using a converter plug? (Obviously, buying everything new in Thailand is the recommended route, but is there anything I can use until old things die?)

 

1. Lights/lamps (with Thai-purchased bulbs, if course)?

2. Electric fans? 

3. Small kitchen appliances (blender, mixer, knife sharpener, coffee maker, electric kettle, rice cooker)?

4. Charger for my electric drill and circular saw? 

5. Charger for my music boombox?

 

I have heard that in general, anything that has a power supply converter won't work. Understood. 

 

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Most converters convert for example 120 V to 220 V but do not convert the frequency. This can give problems with things using an engine/motor (everything that moves/rotates).

 

Usually it is best to use converters with double the wattage of the appliance you want to use. This means that a converter for an electric kettle is probably more expensive than a new kettle.

 

I do not know why. But many things that I brought from Europe and that I should be able to use in Thailand without a converter have failed. While things I bought in Thiland will continue to work. This may be a coincidence, but about half of what I brought with me is now broken.

 

 

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Some things will work, others will not work. We brought mostly things that will work and only a couple things that did to which we bought a transformer.

You will most likely see on the power cable if the item will work in Thailand or not.

Most things I usually ran across would say 110-240v ( will work in thailand ) and some will only have 110v printed on them ( will NOT work in thailand without a transformer )

 

Some items that generally will have 110-240v are laptops, electric shavers, electric toothbrushes, powerbanks ( things that generally are easily transportable and get used internationally ).

Just take a look at the appliance you wish to use in Thailand. Look at the end or beginning of the cable for those numbers mentioned above.

If it only is 110v and you really want to bring it with you, you will need need to know the Wattage of the device ( should also be listed where the Voltage is listed ) and get transformer that can convert at least that amount of Wattage. The previous poster recommended double. The device needs 200 Watt? Get a 400 Watt transformer.

Or you could just buy that device new here. If it is not available in thailand, take a look in Europe. They run on 220-240v and those products will work in thailand.

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Moved to electrical forum

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Both AVR's I have seen now, have also a 110V output. 

 

Maybe you can follow that route? Only it stays 50Hz, Not KHz!!

 

Arjen.

Edited by Arjen

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7 hours ago, dimitriv said:

Most converters convert for example 120 V to 220 V but do not convert the frequency. This can give problems with things using an engine/motor (everything that moves/rotates).

 

Usually it is best to use converters with double the wattage of the appliance you want to use. This means that a converter for an electric kettle is probably more expensive than a new kettle.

 

I do not know why. But many things that I brought from Europe and that I should be able to use in Thailand without a converter have failed. While things I bought in Thiland will continue to work. This may be a coincidence, but about half of what I brought with me is now broken.

 

 

Disagree.

3 phase (380-440V) motors can run off a household plug (220V) via an inverter.

My 1979 Tom Senior M1 milling machine has a 0.75hp single phase Mitsubishi motor purchased here running power feeds and the horizontal spindle, and a 3 phase 0.5hp motor running the vertical spindle via an inverter.

Single phase 220-240V in, 380-440V out.
And the inverter gives the motor variable speeds, 0-60HZ, Thai being 50HZ, and runs perfectly at any speed (HZ).

 

I also imported 2 container fulls of UK stuff here in 05.

Lathe, mill, other machine shop tools, hand power tools galore, all UK 240V on a 3 pin plug.

Nothing, i repeat, nothing has gone tIts up in the last 14 years up.

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Before I moved to Thailand, I bought in the U.S. from Amazon and brought with me a trio of heavy duty voltage converters/transformers of varying capacities, 100W, 500W, and 2000W... They are all heavy solid metal cases with built-in, replaceable fuses, multiple jacks, 2-way conversion (either 120 to 220 or 220 to 120), etc...  All 3 of them are still running perfectly today more than a decade later.

 

The things I've used them for without any problem, or failure or damage to my 120V U.S. electronics, include:

--desktop CPU

--PC video monitor

--desktop PC audio speakers setup

--flatbed photo/document scanner

--electronic food processor

--electronic bread maker/baker

--WaterPik dental jet washer

--portable stereo/CD/tape player set

--kitchen crock pot

 

I don't see the brand I bought for sale anymore on Amazon, but my units look very much like these:

 

525017220_2019-10-1512_05_16.jpg.4401f8580ed7de99653e8801a0314945.jpg

 

 

 

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I use this transformer, bought in Thailand with a chabroil electronic BBQ since a good while, capped at 200 W. Works fine, and it's running for hours... IMG_20191015_123247.jpgIMG_20191015_122937.jpg

Sent from my LYA-L29 using Tapatalk

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51 minutes ago, ThomasThBKK said:

capped at 200 W

2070W, 200W would not do much with a BBQ,

And what did it cost?

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9 minutes ago, KhunBENQ said:

2070W, 200W would not do much with a BBQ,

And what did it cost?

Yes, meant to write 2000 watt.

 

Converter was 3500 THB i think, it's only worth it as we also have a japanese toaster and a weber q 1400 electric BBQ, all from amazon.com/jp, somehow most amazon sellers in europe refuse to send to thailand, or i would have bought the euro versions.

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14 minutes ago, ThomasThBKK said:

Converter was 3500 THB

That makes sense for quality/value products.

 

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