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CrossBones

Getting a Tax File Number without work permit

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Hi

Staying here over 180 days you need to pay taxes on overseas income.

Some income I send overseas some I bring here.

How do I get a tax file and what do they need from me? Can I just declare and say I bought x amount into Thailand - is so I have to show them a bank receipt or something?

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1 hour ago, CrossBones said:

Staying here over 180 days you need to pay taxes on overseas income.

 

If I understand it right you only have to pay tax on foreign income if it is brought into Thailand in the same calendar year as you earned the income. So best to leave the money you don't need abroad.

 

 

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Tell them you need it for your savings account you are setting up for retirement purposes.

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4 hours ago, CrossBones said:

Staying here over 180 days you need to pay taxes on overseas income.

Some income I send overseas some I bring here.

How do I get a tax file and what do they need from me? Can I just declare and say I bought x amount into Thailand - is so I have to show them a bank receipt or something?

You can get a Tax ID number from your local tax office. Once you have that you can file a tax return.

 

You probably should speak to an accountant before handing over your hard earned cash to the Thai taxman!

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As elviajero post. Just go to the Revenue Office and obtain your Tax ID. You will only need your passport and maybe a document providing address in Thailand.

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2 hours ago, saengd said:

I don't think there are that many foreign expats who voluntarily declare their overseas income to the Thai tax people, I've not met or even heard of even one in just under 20 years!

 

It can be good to pay something. Even if it is only $100. Being in Thailand for more than 180 days and being able to prove that you are a tax resident who paid tax makes things more clear if you get problems with the tax office in your old home country. This does probably not apply to US residents. But in my situation if I ever wanted to go back to my home country it could be very useful.

 

 

 

Edited by dimitriv
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2 hours ago, saengd said:

It's very easy to get a Thai tax ID, simply visit the local tax office, with your passport and ask for one, as long as your passport shows that you spend more than 180 days in Thailand they will issue you with a number within 15 minutes. 

They asked me for a Residence Certificate too. 

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I never spent 180 days in Thailand I got a Tax ID number easily. This is for refund of excess interest deductions on savings accounts, no other Thai income. Think of it this way. A man has a stack of 100 Hong Kong dollars on his desk in Hong Kong. Every year He earns $30 HKD, and every year he brings $HKD 10 into Thailand. As money is a fungible asset, he always brings in dollars from the bottom of the stack earned more than one year ago.  It is not taxable.

 

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On 10/16/2019 at 4:53 AM, saengd said:

It's very easy to get a Thai tax ID, simply visit the local tax office, with your passport and ask for one, as long as your passport shows that you spend more than 180 days in Thailand they will issue you with a number within 15 minutes. 

You may be that fortunate or not and perhaps they are more used to the request now than previously. 5 years ago it took a lot more time and effort than you suggest. I think it is going to very much depend on the specific tax office you need to use.

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Take proof of address too.  That could be something like

1) residence certificate 

2) yellow house book

3) work permit

 

Be sure to go to the office that covers the area where you live.

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For US citizens they have to report and pay tax on bank interest earned. So it doesn't make sense to reclaim tax paid. You just use that to reduce your tax bill when filing your annual tax return.

 

Europeans, Auzzies do you do the same?

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4 minutes ago, inThailand said:

For US citizens they have to report and pay tax on bank interest earned. So it doesn't make sense to reclaim tax paid. You just use that to reduce your tax bill when filing your annual tax return.

 

Europeans, Auzzies do you do the same?

It depends which country allows more latitude and flexibility in their tax system and which allows other options to be exercised. I'm a Brit and I reclaim my Thai tax paid here in Thailand. I then add that income to my UK tax bill and if I owe UK tax I offset that by making a UK pension contribution.

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14 minutes ago, saengd said:

It depends which country allows more latitude and flexibility in their tax system and which allows other options to be exercised. I'm a Brit and I reclaim my Thai tax paid here in Thailand. I then add that income to my UK tax bill and if I owe UK tax I offset that by making a UK pension contribution.

So you are still officially resident for tax purposes in the UK?

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16 minutes ago, topt said:

So you are still officially resident for tax purposes in the UK?

I am tax resident in both countries. I have foreign income and rental income that arises in the UK so I am obliged to file a tax return. I file a Thai tax return to reclaim my interest paid in Thailand which as said I then lodge as income in the UK. The issue of 183 days is not material in every case, it is easily possible to be resident for tax purposes in several countries at the same time and in fact it can be beneficial to be so.

 

BTW I'm not "still" UK tax resident, I made myself UK tax resident once again on purpose two years ago.

Edited by saengd

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