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Russia says 'unacceptable' Turkish incursion into Syria must be temporary

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Russia says 'unacceptable' Turkish incursion into Syria must be temporary

By Olesya Astakhova and Andrew Osborn

 

2019-10-15T182516Z_2_LYNXMPEF9E16Q_RTROPTP_4_SYRIA-SECURITY-TURKEY-USA.JPG

A Turkish soldier stands on top of an armoured personnel carrier (APC) near the Turkish-Syrian border in Sanliurfa province, Turkey, October 15, 2019. REUTERS/Murad Sezer

 

ABU DHABI/MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia called Turkey's military incursion into northeast Syria "unacceptable" and said on Tuesday the operation had to be limited in time and scale, a rare broadside that suggests Moscow's patience with Ankara is wearing thin.

 

In Russia's strongest criticism since Turkey launched its military operation last week, President Vladimir Putin's envoy for Syria indicated Moscow wanted Ankara to wrap up its offensive soon.

 

"We didn't agree with the Turks any questions about their presence in Syria and we don't approve of their actions," envoy Alexander Lavrentiev told reporters in Abu Dhabi during an official visit there by Putin.

 

He said Turkish troops had the right under an agreement struck between Damascus and Ankara in 1998, the Adana pact, to temporarily push up to a maximum of 10 km (6 miles) into Syria to conduct counter-terrorism operations.

 

"But it doesn't give them (Turkish troops) the right to remain on Syrian territory permanently and we are opposed to Turkish troops staying on Syrian territory permanently," he said.

 

Lavrentiev made his comments as Turkey pressed ahead with its offensive in northern Syria despite U.S. sanctions and growing calls for it to stop, while Syria's Russia-backed army moved on the key city of Manbij that was abandoned by U.S. forces.

 

The Kremlin said late on Tuesday that Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan had phoned Putin. The Russian leader had used the call to complain about the humanitarian situation on the Turkish-Syrian border and had stressed the need to avoid a clash between Turkish and Syrian forces, it said.

 

Putin had told Erdogan that the situation whereby Islamic State prisoners being held in custody by Syrian Kurds were exploiting the chaos by trying to escape was unacceptable, the Kremlin said.

 

Putin had also invited Erdogan to visit Russia in the coming days for urgent talks, a proposal Ankara had accepted, it added.

 

Lavrentiev, Putin's Syria envoy, earlier on Tuesday told Russian news agencies that Moscow had always considered any kind of Turkish military operation on Syrian territory unacceptable.

 

His comments, which suggest growing tensions between Turkey and Russia, came a day after the Kremlin complained that Turkey's incursion was "not exactly" compatible with Syrian territorial integrity.

 

"The security of the Turkish-Syrian border must be ensured by the deployment of Syrian government troops along its entire length," said Lavrentiev. "That's why we never spoke in favour or supported the idea of Turkish units (being deployed there) let alone the armed Syrian opposition."

 

Lavrentiev said Turkey's actions risked upsetting delicate religious sensitivities in northern Syria.

 

In particular, he said the area was populated by Kurds, Arabs and Sunnis who would not take kindly to their lands being resettled by people who had never lived there, a reference to Turkey's plan to house refugees from other parts of Syria there.

 

Lavrentiev confirmed that Russia had brokered an agreement between the Syrian government and Kurdish forces that saw the Kurds cede control of territory to Syrian troops.

 

Those talks had taken place at Russia's Hmeimim air base in Syria among other places, he said.

 

Russia's influence in Syria and the Middle East is widely seen to have been boosted in the last week thanks to Washington scaling back its Syria operation and the Syrian Kurds striking a deal with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, Moscow's closest ally in the region.

 

Lavrentiev said Moscow was hoping that the United States would withdraw all of its forces from Syria. Russian Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu spoke to his U.S. counterpart about Syria on Tuesday evening.

 

Russian military police are patrolling the line of contact between Syrian and Turkish government troops.

 

Lavrentiev estimated there were around 12,000 Islamic State prisoners being held in northeast Syria.

 

(Additional reporting by Maria Tsvetkova, Maxim Rodionov and Tom Balmforth; Writing by Andrew Osborn; Editing by Alistair Bell and Lisa Shumaker)

 

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2019-10-16
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Hey hands off Donald gave it to putin 

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3 hours ago, webfact said:

12,000 Islamic State prisoners being held in northeast Syria.

what were they going to do with them?

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before you can resolve issues, you must FIRST understand what the issue is.

 

the koran says that muslims must always side with other muslims where non-muslims are concerned.  non-muslims are so despicable, they are not even worthy of being told the truth.

 

on the other hand, the koran also says that it is acceptable to commit genocide against it's own people if it resulted in the greater goals of the caliphate.  namely survival.

 

in the western world, deception and lying are considered bad traits.  in islam, they are virtues.  taqiyya

 

https://www.thereligionofpeace.com/pages/quran/taqiyya.aspx

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2 hours ago, wombat said:

what were they going to do with them?

new recruits

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5 hours ago, DEKEM said:

the koran says that muslims must always side with other muslims where non-muslims are concerned.  non-muslims are so despicable, they are not even worthy of being told the truth.

 

Then why don't the refugee's not go to Qatar where all citizens get 100.000 us$ a year from the government? Ones that work get a salary plus house on top of that.

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2 hours ago, Chomper Higgot said:

There are few things more dangerous than a βeta pretending to be an αlpha.

 

Except of course when it’s a βeta male pretending to be an αlpha male and he’s also the President of the most powerful nation on earth.

 

Talk big, make threats, back down and hand gifts to Putin.

 

Yeah, we know you and Tug hate Trump.

 

This is a post about Turkey invading Syria to exterminate Kurds. And Putin's reaction. We know Trump dumped the Kurds, no need to repeat it like a parrot on every thread.

 

Any intelligent comment to make on the OP?

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2 minutes ago, fruitman said:

Then why don't the refugee's not go to Qatar where all citizens get 100.000 us$ a year from the government? Ones that work get a salary plus house on top of that.

 

Because rich Arab Muslim countries don't grant citizenship to Muslim refugees from other countries. They may let some in, let them work and live there, raise families there - but do not grant them or their families citizenship.

 

They look after their own citizens, first, second and last.

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3 hours ago, Chomper Higgot said:

There are few things more dangerous than a βeta pretending to be an αlpha.

 

Except of course when it’s a βeta male pretending to be an αlpha male and he’s also the President of the most powerful nation on earth.

 

Talk big, make threats, back down and hand gifts to Putin.

To Putin and Xi.

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"Unacceptable" has become one of the new buzzwords for diplomats. Nowadays everything that the West doesn't like it deems to be "unacceptable". 

 

It is now being used by the West's chief enemy, Mr Putin. The jealousy of Mr Putin runs very deep in the West....indeed he is "unacceptable" because ehe does "unacceptable" things, like "liberating" Crimea" (or "invading" Crimea if you are writing for the West) and "helping Syria avoid the Western backed regime change" (or "interfering: in Syria if you are from the West).

 

Putin has outsmarted the West almost at every turn....and the latest Syrian gambit looks like a repeat of the same long running show. Outsmarting the leaders of the West, weak, spineless and pusillanimous as they are, is of course "unacceptable" from a Western point of view, even if, or especially, if it brings peace to the region. "Unacceptable" apparently is a diplomatic code word for doing nothing when it comes from the West. I suspect that used by Putin, it might actually be translated into actions.

 

One wonders how long the West can carry on with such useless leadership....and if I sound like a Putin fan, I unashamedly am, but sadly I don't get paid for it. Don't get me wrong, I see Putin has some less than desirable qualities, like ruthlessness (eg the speed at which he "invaded" Crimea to protect his naval base there). No Western leader could ever have made such a move without endless debates in the press about whether it would be a good idea, by which time the opportunity for action would've passed.

 

But despite being corrupt like the rest of the world leadership, he is effective, unlike the shower from the Brussels or the dotard in the White House.

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Wonder how Europe and Russia will react when Turkey finally stops it's invasion, but retaliates by letting through all the thousands of migrants, refugees etc to storm into the neighbouring nations ?

Edited by observer90210
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8 minutes ago, observer90210 said:

Wonder how Europe and Russia will react when Turkey finally  "abdicates" their invasion, but retaliates by letting through all the thousands of migrants, refugees etc to storm into the neighbouring nations ?

war

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