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American boxer Day dies following brutal knockout

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American boxer Day dies following brutal knockout

 

2019-10-16T235438Z_1_LYNXMPEF9F23M_RTROPTP_3_BOXING.JPG

FILE PHOTO: Oct 12, 2019; Chicago, IL, USA; Patrick Day (red trunks) reacts after getting knocked down by Charles Conwell (not pictured) during a USBA Super-Welterweight boxing match at Wintrust Arena. Credit: Jon Durr-USA TODAY Sports

 

(Reuters) - American boxer Patrick Day died on Wednesday in Chicago as a result of the traumatic brain injury he suffered during his fight on Saturday, where he was knocked out by Charles Conwell in the 10th round.

 

Day, 27, had been in a coma for four days following his defeat and, despite having emergency brain surgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, doctors were unable to save the junior middleweight.

 

"Patrick Day passed away today, October 16, 2019, succumbing to the traumatic brain injury he suffered in his fight this past Saturday, October 12, at the Wintrust Arena in Chicago, IL," his promoter Lou DiBella said in a statement.

 

"He was surrounded by his family, close friends and members of his boxing team, including his mentor, friend and trainer Joe Higgins."

 

"On behalf of Patrick's family, team, and those closest to him, we are grateful for the prayers, expressions of support and outpouring of love for Pat that have been so obvious since his injury."

 

Day was rushed to the hospital on a stretcher after Conwell landed a flurry of punches that left him motionless on the canvas.

 

Before turning professional, Day was a highly decorated amateur who won two nationals titles.

 

He turned pro in 2013 and became a world-rated super welterweight contender, capturing the WBC Continental Americas championship in 2017 and the IBF Intercontinental championship in 2019. In June he was rated in the top-10 by both the WBC and IBF.

 

Day's death comes after 23-year-old Argentine super lightweight Hugo Santillan died in July from injuries suffered in the ring and 28-year-old Russian Maxim Dadashev passed away two day earlier from brain injuries during his fight.

 

"It becomes very difficult to explain away or justify the dangers of boxing at a time like this," DiBella said.

 

"This is not a time where edicts or pronouncements are appropriate, or the answers are readily available. It is, however, a time for a call to action.

 

"While we don't have the answers, we certainly know many of the questions, have the means to answer them, and have the opportunity to respond responsibly and accordingly and make boxing safer for all who participate.

 

"This is a way we can honour the legacy of Pat Day. Many people live much longer than Patrick's 27 years, wondering if they made a difference or positively affected their world. This was not the case for Patrick Day when he left us.

 

"Rest in peace and power, Pat, with the angels."

 

(Reporting by Rory Carroll in Los Angeles)

 

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2019-10-17

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Art of self defense turns into a vigorous fight for life, yet with known risks.

RIP

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This is how all wars should be fought.  No "armies" needed.  Just a simple 2 men enter, i man leaves rule. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, webfact said:

"It becomes very difficult to explain away or justify the dangers of boxing at a time like this," DiBella said.

No, not really. What happened is truly sad and my thoughts goes to his family and friends.

However, how many people have died at motorcycle races, Formula 1 and Nascar? That´s just a few examples.
 

Besides that we can look at all plane crashes, car and motorbike accidents that result in a massive amount of deaths per year. Are we going to ban all that?

Where is the line going to be drawn? Boxing has been a sport for a very long time, and have actually not seen many deaths. It can still be explained and it´s still possible to justify the sport, regardless of this tragic outcome in one of the many hundreds of fights happening every single year.

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8 minutes ago, stevenl said:

The main difference is that during a boxing match you want to hurt your opponent as much as you can, so much so you want him to pass out.

Nobody is forcing them to box. They all know the risks.

 

If you don't like it you can change the channel.

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31 minutes ago, stevenl said:

The main difference is that during a boxing match you want to hurt your opponent as much as you can, so much so you want him to pass out.

There you are totally wrong. Nobody wants to hurt the other part. They see it as a sport and know all the risks with it. They actually tries to knock each other out as clean as possible for minimum damage. They are almost all the time, very respectful to eachother. All the talk before is just for show.

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6 minutes ago, Matzzon said:

There you are totally wrong. Nobody wants to hurt the other part. They see it as a sport and know all the risks with it. They actually tries to knock each other out as clean as possible for minimum damage. They are almost all the time, very respectful to eachother. All the talk before is just for show.

Sorry, I don't do semantics discussions about the difference between hurting your opponent and trying to knock him down.

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5 minutes ago, stevenl said:

Sorry, I don't do semantics discussions about the difference between hurting your opponent and trying to knock him down.

Don´t engage in one then. Have a nice day 🙂 

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