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Ancient 'Lost City' of Khmer Empire Rediscovered Hidden Under The Cambodian Jungle

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The big question is, why did the city fail?

There seems to be some parallels with some modern cities in the USA - Detroit and Pittsburgh, for example.

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5 minutes ago, Lacessit said:

The big question is, why did the city fail?

There seems to be some parallels with some modern cities in the USA - Detroit and Pittsburgh, for example.

Pittsburg?

 

Regardless, there is no comparison.

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3 hours ago, Nyezhov said:

Pittsburg?

 

Regardless, there is no comparison.

Why not? On the banks of what I think is the Monaghela River, there is nothing but acres of flat concrete where steel mills used to be.

Go out to Monroeville. There was a research centre for US Steel there. Used to employ 3000 scientists and engineers. Last time I was there, 1995, it was down to 200 and the cost-cutting was ongoing. It reminded me of the statement " The floggings will continue until morale improves".

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3 hours ago, Lacessit said:

The big question is, why did the city fail?

There seems to be some parallels with some modern cities in the USA - Detroit and Pittsburgh, for example.

From the link in the OP :

 

"In the years to come, the Khmer Empire moved its centre of operations to the new capital, Angkor, perhaps due to better conditions for growing food in a less mountainous and challenging environment".

 

It seems a good enough reason, but there could be other reasons too.

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We can only hope that anything of value is not sent overseas to stuff crony bank accounts. 

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Climate change caused by less rainfall was a factor causing both Angkor Wat and Mahendraparvata to go into decline. 

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6 hours ago, Nyezhov said:

Pittsburg?

 

Regardless, there is no comparison.

They had a Tomlin like ruler, perhaps?

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6 hours ago, Lacessit said:

The big question is, why did the city fail?

There seems to be some parallels with some modern cities in the USA - Detroit and Pittsburgh, for example.

Actually the big question was why did the Khmer Empire fail? It is believed that there were ecological and climate reasons that affected the food supply (rice and fish) and this led to the decline.

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 Is the stone of the Khmer ruins limestone? I read an interesting article of how the limestone from the ruins leaches in to the ground affecting the surrounding vegetation and a technique where such affect is detected from satellites,revealing many lost Ancient ruins.https://spacenews.com/satellites-read-leaves-help-find-ancient-ruins/   

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2 hours ago, terryw said:

Climate change caused by less rainfall was a factor causing both Angkor Wat and Mahendraparvata to go into decline. 

But I thought climate never changed until the late 1970’s or early 1980’s.

    That’s when everyone started saying climate was starting to change and get warmer and the planet is doomed. Climate never changed until we started burning fossil fuels. Now we have global warming and the Arctic Sea is is gone and the Polar Bears disappearing.

 Al Gore, Leonardo DiCaprio and Greta Thunberg and Extinction Rebellion are trying to teach us and warn us. We need to listen to them. 

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