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sidjameson

For the middle aged and up here did you make your friends in Thailand?

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When your young making friends seems easy. Pass a certain age its harder. Just curious how successful TV members have been with their social life.

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Hello

When I first came to Thailand I saw an advert for a expat club in pattaya they meet up at the macure Hotel on a Friday morning have made many many friends there, then I joined the local gym and again made friends, really its up to you to be open and willing to mix in and join in, but one thing I hate is the wingers who complain about everything, keep with positive people, there are two expats clubs in pattaya, one in Chang mai if I remember correctly anybody know of any more in Thailand?? 

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I have a couple of friends here. A couple of friends I stay in contact with back in Australia. My Thai GF has friends everywhere, it's her gift. I don't know if I would want that, because it baffles me how she keeps track of them all.

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Having lived over half of my life in Thailand I have very close friends from both Thailand and the UK.

 

Close friends in the UK are those I was at school and Uni with in the UK and whom I see regularly on my biannual visits to the UK, keeping in touch and maintaining friendships takes mutual effort, I'm glad the majority of my friends make the same effort as I do. 

 

I also have a number of close friends in Thailand, they are those who I've met while here and from a mixture of Western countries and Thailand. One of my Closest friends is a Thai guy I've known for about 20 years. I see all of my close friends quite regularly.

 

I also have plenty of acquaintances I've know for a number of years, closer friendship and trust is developing to the point I would all some of them friends. 

 

I find it very easy to make acquaintances, I find it easy to talk with different people providing they are not tools, trust and friendship takes much longer to develop - Genuine friendships takes time. 

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As Richard above, I too am a 'long term' expat having been blessed to have spent most of my working life in Thailand (punctuated with spells back in the UK).

Over the years I've made many good friends (both Thai and non-Thai), some of whom lasted in Thailand and still visit to this day. Many more though have fallen by the wayside. They were around for a few years, then for whatever reason, they went home, felt like they had 'done' their time in Thailand. I occasionally stumble across an 'old face' from back in the mists of time. One thing they all have in common is that they are all incredibly fond of their time in Thailand. 

A good social life in Thailand is an easy thing to achieve, especially if you are not a weirdo, scrounger, braggart, bullsh*tter or prat in general you should be fine.

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The older we get the more difficult it can be to make friends.  I still have friends in the UK but as an expat i find i disagree with their politics.  They tend to be pro remain, pro immigration,  pro extinction rebellion. The expats tend to be pro brexit, anti immigration and despise the extinction rebellion scum. At home in the UK i do not discuss Islam for example. My friends hardly see how much the UK has changed for the worst because it is gradual but after 20 years away I really notice how <deleted> the UK is to to demographic and cultural changes. So I discuss nothing of importance to me. At least here my fellow expats agree with my world view. But what is a friend?

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I think friendships takes time. And it can't be forced or accelerated.

I have a couple of friends in Thailand and with all of them it took years to build the friendship. And I am pretty sure it would not have been possible to see them at the beginning more often and accelerate that process.

It seems in Thailand, and maybe in other places as well, there are some people which initially seem alright but after a while it becomes obvious that they don't intend to be friendly. Some are crooks, some or just idiots.

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I moved to LOS in my 60s ( previously just holidays ).

I MADE no friends in LOS, but I spent a lot of time in the village where English was hard to come by or in Lamphun where few farangs live. I didn't meet any Thai men I wanted to be friends with, and my female "friends" were no longer after I got engaged.

 

However, I was quite happy living my life with just my wife, till I wasn't. 

I thought she was a friend, but sadly she wasn't.

 

Looking back, the people that have done me the worst were those that I loved the most and should have been better to me. A couple of real backstabbers were my "friends" for 30 years.

 

Perhaps I just made friends with the wrong people.

 

Far as friends back home go, I live many hours drive from most of them ( So far away, Doesn't anybody stay in one place anymore It would be so fine to see your face at my door- Carole King ) so I never see them now, and many I just lost touch with over the many years travelling.

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Made a small number of friends over the decades - all non-Thais. 

 

Most other acquaintances outlived their purpose once people left Thailand or moved within Thailand. 

 

Expats from different countries are often quite different of course. 

 

I had a German friend who returned to Germany a few years ago. He didn't quite like some of my other social group who were from Norway and Sweden. A couple Brit friends seemed to dislike everyone. 

 

They were all older and relatively inflexible to adjust to new people. 

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I'm a country dweller and prefer it that way. And I'm also a bit of a reclusive person. There are a few fellow falangs of varying nationalities in the neighbourhood with whom I keep casual contact with but not too much

 

One common factor with all of them is that they seem to want a 'drinking partner', especially my closest one, a German. I drink very little, generally only one beer per day, so I tend to be a little bit aloof. Not judgmentally so, it's their life, but it doesn't suit me at all.

 

 

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