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pt1001

Reheating street food??

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Just a quick one really to make sure...but I was desperate and bought some chicken skewers from a road side stall. They're more or less cold he offered to heat them but I'd much rather do it myself. Is it safe to bring them home and blast them in the frying pan? Or is it not worth the botulism.

 

Thanks

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I've done it many times, still here. However, bought a kebab from my favourite stall a couple of nights ago but didn't want it when I got home so stuck it in the fridge. Rediscovered it today and stuck it in the microwave for my lunch. Meh. Ate a third of it and the rest went in the bin.

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1 hour ago, pt1001 said:

Just a quick one really to make sure...but I was desperate and bought some chicken skewers from a road side stall. They're more or less cold he offered to heat them but I'd much rather do it myself. Is it safe to bring them home and blast them in the frying pan? Or is it not worth the botulism.

 

Thanks

 

I know we are strangers but can I have your smartphone if you don't make it. A simple note leaving it to Denim stapled to your corpse will be ok.

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When I was a living the dream in Pattaya in the early 80's, street food was what one frequently grabbed during or at the end of the night. It was never something to take home and eat later... not at that price anyway.

 

I came down with Hepatitis-A about 3 weeks after returning from Pattaya to work in China. Since none of the other 18 guys that ate at the same mess hall with food from the same kitchen got sick, I was made aware of Hep-A incubation time. The doctor at the Aussie embassy in Beijing backed up the idea that I ate something bad before I came back to work. After self-medical evacuation and back in Pattaya, the provisional diagnosis was confirmed by Dr. Belen.

 

One evening, during my subsequent convalescence and 1-year abstinence from alcohol, I was sitting with BJ in his bar, chewing the fat, nursing a coke and feeling hungry. Back then, the food carts weren't allowed onto Walking Street until after 2 AM. The carts would jam the side soi's waiting for the city 'food police' to go off duty and then there would be a 'wacky races' moment to get out on the street and bag the best locations. We witnessed a slower cart colliding with another and some gai yang falling into the black puddle in the pothole next to BJ's garbage bin. The slow cart pusher grabbed the chicken from the puddle, shook them vigorously to get rid of the foul water, placed them back on the cart and angrily stomped off to her station.

 

"Did you see that sh!t?" asked BJ?

Edited by NanLaew

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If you heat them enough and for like 5 minutes all the germs are dead...so it's safe to eat.

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5 hours ago, NanLaew said:

When I was a living the dream in Pattaya in the early 80's, street food was what one frequently grabbed during or at the end of the night. It was never something to take home and eat later... not at the price anyway.

 

I came down with Hepatitis-A about 3 weeks after returning from Pattaya to work in China. Since none of the other 18 guys that ate at the same mess hall with food from the same kitchen got sick, I was made aware of Hep-A incubation time. The doctor at the Aussie embassy in Beijing backed up the idea that I ate something bad before I came back to work. After self-medical evacuation and back in Pattaya, the provisional diagnosis was confirmed by Dr. Belen.

 

One evening, during my subsequent convalescence and 1-year abstinence from alcohol, I was sitting with BJ in his bar, chewing the fat, nursing a coke and feeling hungry. Back then, the food carts weren't allowed onto Walking Street until after 2 AM. The carts would jam the side soi's waiting for the city 'food police' to go off duty and then there would be a 'wacky races' moment to get out on the street and bag the best locations. We witnessed a slower cart colliding with another and some gai yang falling into the black puddle in the pothole next to BJ's garbage bin. The slow cart pusher grabbed the chicken from the puddle, shook them vigorously to get rid of the foul water, placed them back on the cart and angrily stomped off to her station.

 

"Did you see that sh!t?" asked BJ?

I just watched some shows of gordon ramsays hells kitchen..i've seen a few american chefs dropping meat on the floor and just putting it in the pan...gordon also saw it and you can guess his reaction...

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3 minutes ago, Thian said:

If you heat them enough and for like 5 minutes all the germs are dead...so it's safe to eat.

totally nuked.. inedible what was left

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"Most foods, especially meat, poultry, fish and eggs, should be cooked thoroughly to kill most types of food poisoning bacteria. In general, food should be cooked to a temperature of at least 75 °C or hotter."

 

Do that or deep fry @150+ and that'll nuke it !

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, madmen said:

totally nuked.. inedible what was left

Chicken skewers i would warm up in the oven...not in the microwave.

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