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World Scrabble Championship: "Bearded GOAT" seals it with "AVOIDERS"!

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World Scrabble Championship: "Bearded GOAT" seals it with "AVOIDERS"!

 

WESPAC-Nigel-in-final.jpg

World Scrabble Championship: "Bearded GOAT" seals it with "AVOIDERS"!

 

Undisputed world champion Nigel Richards of New Zealand during the final game in Goa, India.

 

Nigel Richards of New Zealand - the greatest Scrabble player of all time - won the WESPAC World Scrabble Championship in Goa, India on Sunday. 

 

Jesse Day of the United States led 3-2 in the best of seven final but Nigel - owner of the moniker "The Bearded GOAT" - won the last two games to take the title.

 

WESPAC-final-board.jpg

The final board of Game 7, the last game of the WESPAC final.

 

He is now the undisputed world champion having taken the two recognised world title events - the MSA World Scrabble Championship in England last year and now the World English Scrabble Players' Association title. 

 

Nigel - a multiple world champion in both English and French lexicons - is also the holder of another Scrabble "major", the coveted King's Cup that was held in Bangkok, Thailand in July. 

 

Nigel sealed the win in Goa with the "nine-timer" AVOIDERS that netted him 167 points and an unassailable lead. 

 

In the qualifying rounds of the tournament the top Thais were Bangkokian Thacha Koowirat who finished third, Chiang Mai doctor Jakkrit Klaphajone who was 13th and 15 year old Tarin Pairor from Korat who was 22nd.

 

Tarin beat Nigel in one round of the qualifying tournament.

 

Thailand plays host to the international Princess Cup at Central Bang Na in November. 

 

 
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-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2019-10-21

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Well done to the Kiwi, had "Google" working overtime comming to terms with some, no, most of these words!

  • Haha 1

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3 hours ago, bdenner said:

Well done to the Kiwi, had "Google" working overtime comming to terms with some, no, most of these words!

Agreed - gave up after 4 when I realised, as I don't play scrabble, that I would never need any of them:smile:

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It's a fun game with the kids. Takes about an hour. No electronics. Good teaching tool.

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What English dictionary do these competitions use to check the validity of words?   And what are the rules about proper nouns?  Other rules?

 

Thanks for any info.

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11 minutes ago, PGSan said:

What English dictionary do these competitions use to check the validity of words?   And what are the rules about proper nouns?  Other rules?

 

Thanks for any info.

I believe there is an official Scrabble dictionary that contains many obscure words.

I doubt there is much brilliance behind it, as many that excel at the game have a very good memory for unusual high scoring words that fit well on the board.

 

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8 hours ago, PGSan said:

What English dictionary do these competitions use to check the validity of words?   And what are the rules about proper nouns?  Other rules?

 

Thanks for any info.

Collins dictionary is used. It has about a quarter of a million words. If a word is in there it is ok, if it isn't then it's not. Tons of words that many people would consider to be proper nouns are just nouns. It is impossible to give a definitive answer on that. Professional competition rules are very much more in-depth than what it says inside the box in a Scrabble set. 

 

Rooster (pro-player living in Thailand)

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8 hours ago, pookondee said:

I believe there is an official Scrabble dictionary that contains many obscure words.

I doubt there is much brilliance behind it, as many that excel at the game have a very good memory for unusual high scoring words that fit well on the board.

 

The brilliance comes in not just knowing the words, but finding and then choosing the right one.

 

Rooster

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