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Auntie’s fermented fish safe from salt tax, says govt

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Auntie’s fermented fish safe from salt tax, says govt

By The Nation

 

800_ae5d72d037ab5e2.png?v=1571567578

Nathakorn

 

A planned tax on salted foods will not apply to traditional dishes made within communities, the Excise Department insists.

 

Deputy spokesman Nathakorn Uthainsut said ordinary cooks and vendors needn’t worry about the incoming excise tax on food products with high sodium content.

 

The tax will not be applied to salted dried fish, fermented fish or shrimp or other food products in which the salt has always been used as a preservative.

 

The tax is instead aimed at larger-scale manufacturers who add salt to enhance the tastiness of snacks, instant noodles and canned food, Nathakorn said.

 

The objective is to lower people’s sodium intake for the sake of their health, he said, noting that the World Health Organisation advocates no more than 2,000 milligrams per day and Thailand’s Public Health Ministry accepts 2,400mg.

 

Nathakorn said it hadn’t been determined which of those limits will be reflected in the terms of the new excise tax.

 

A schedule of new tax rates should be ready by year-end, he said.

 

The department will allow food producers an adjustment period of up to two years, just as makers of sugary beverages were given breathing space when a sugar tax was introduced.

 

Source: https://www.nationthailand.com/business/30377582

 

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-- © Copyright The Nation Thailand 2019-10-21
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3 hours ago, webfact said:

The tax will not be applied to salted dried fish, fermented fish or shrimp or other food products in which the salt has always been used as a preservative.

Does that mean the end user will have to sign an agreement to wash the above and remove all traces of salt, in order to avoid paying the new tax? I can see an opportunity for a bureaucratic wet dream!

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4 hours ago, webfact said:

Auntie’s fermented fish safe from salt tax

Unfortunately, the fermented fish is not safe (to eat).

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4 hours ago, webfact said:

The objective is to lower people’s sodium intake for the sake of their health,

I somehow find this hard to impossible to believe. More like trying to make a mark for himself under the guise of health safety but all the while the government takes businesses for a new ride.
Don't think he is finished as he will try to up the ante with some other hair brained idea again.

 

Why would they not tax fish sauce or salt itself?

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4 hours ago, webfact said:

The tax will not be applied to salted dried fish, fermented fish or shrimp or other food products in which the salt has always been used as a preservative.

So if I labelled my crisps 'Salt preserved' they'd be ok ?

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15 minutes ago, holy cow cm said:

I somehow find this hard to impossible to believe. More like trying to make a mark for himself under the guise of health safety but all the while the government takes businesses for a new ride.
Don't think he is finished as he will try to up the ante with some other hair brained idea again.

 

Why would they not tax fish sauce or salt itself?

Stock up on Lea and Perrins 

Imported and contains salt.

Edited by overherebc

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15 minutes ago, holy cow cm said:

I somehow find this hard to impossible to believe. More like trying to make a mark for himself under the guise of health safety but all the while the government takes businesses for a new ride.
Don't think he is finished as he will try to up the ante with some other hair brained idea again.

 

Why would they not tax fish sauce or salt itself?

Because they are after prepared or processed foods foods that may have a high or even hidden salt content. 

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7 minutes ago, metempsychotic said:

Because they are after prepared or processed foods foods that may have a high or even hidden salt content. 

There is nothing hidden about it most processed food does contain salt ......Just read the label........

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12 minutes ago, metempsychotic said:

Because they are after prepared or processed foods foods that may have a high or even hidden salt content. 

There is no hidden salt content. It will all show on the nutritional testing on the label. 

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Salt is a mineral and electrolyte essential to our bodily function especially in a hot country and taxing it is just mad.
Sure too much salt is not good same with every substance but a packet of noodles ain't gonna kill you.
If they are really concerned about our health why not tax all products containing salt?
Will they apply this tax equally to all products including Thai and Imported
Will Thai noodles get taxed at same rate as Korean?
Or will it be used to replace lost Tariffs because from trade agreements.
Pretty sure most Farang food will get taxed.
What about MSG tax?

Edited by monkfish
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Can't foresee the tax man standing in Samut Songkran at the roadside salt sellers?

 

samut-songkhram-thailand-bags-salt-18031

Edited by VocalNeal
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If they are going to tax salt ,the only fair way would be to tax

it when it leaves the producer,like alcohol,tobacco,but as usual

Thailand is going to do it the difficult way,Thai,salted fish,fish sauce,

street food are all very high in salt,but they are not been covered by

this salt tax,as the Government knows if it did impose tax on those

it would cause an uproar.so just pick and choose,I am thinking this

may just be a tax, to raise funds to buy more war weapons.

regards worgeordie

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