Jump to content
BANGKOK
Jonathan Fairfield

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, minus beard, appears in London court

Recommended Posts

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, minus beard, appears in London court

 

w2.png

Demonstrators hold placards during a protest outside of Westminster Magistrates Court, where a case management hearing in the U.S. extradition case of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is held, in London, Britain, October 21, 2019. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

 

LONDON (Reuters) - WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange appeared in a London court on Monday for a hearing on whether he should be extradited to the United States to face spying charges.

 

Assange, dressed in a navy suit and light blue jumper, raised his fist to supporters in the public gallery. He was cleanly shaven in contrast to the long beard he had grown while holed up in Ecuador's embassy.

 

Assange, 48, faces 18 counts in the U.S. including conspiring to hack government computers and violating an espionage law. He could spend decades in prison if convicted.

 

Australian-born Assange made international headlines in early 2010 when WikiLeaks published a classified U.S. military video showing a 2007 attack by Apache helicopters in Baghdad that killed a dozen people, including two Reuters news staff.

 

Admirers have hailed Assange as a hero for exposing what they describe as abuse of power by modern states and for championing free speech.

 

His detractors have painted him as a dangerous figure complicit in Russian efforts to undermine the West and U.S. security, and dispute that he is a journalist.

 

WikiLeaks angered Washington by publishing hundreds of thousands of secret U.S. diplomatic cables that laid bare critical U.S. appraisals of world leaders, from Russian President Vladimir Putin to members of the Saudi royal family.

In 2012, he took refuge in Ecuador’s London embassy to avoid extradition to Sweden where he was accused of sex crimes which he denied, saying he believed he would ultimately be sent on to the United Sates.

 

He was dragged from the embassy in April after seven years and given a 50-week jail term for skipping bail. That sentence was completed but he remains in prison while his extradition case continues.

 

(Reporting by Andrew MacAskill; writing by Guy Faulconbridge; editing by Alistair Smout)

 

reuters_logo.jpg

-- © Copyright Reuters 2019-10-21
  • Like 1
  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Scouse123 said:

]

Apparently,

 

The Ecuadorians found him to be ungrateful, obnoxious, demanding, untidy and uncooperative with their Embassy officials and a complete pain in the backside.

 

They were glad to see the back of him and had tried for years to get him to leave realizing they had opened a can of worms.

 

All that said, the Australian government are the ones who should be assisting him with his legal rights and objections to the extradition request by the US.

Australia has extradition arrangements with USA, so helping him to Australia won't do him any good.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Montnoveau said:

Australia has extradition arrangements with USA, so helping him to Australia won't do him any good.

 I agree,

 

But for the sake of fairness and transparency I would, if I were in charge, return him to Australia and let them in his country of origin and the Americans sort it out.

 

He faces life imprisonment in the States, if convicted on the very serious charges he is facing and he is a very high profile figure. We will have all kinds of Human rights organizations vilifying Britain if these matters are not followed very carefully with every i dotted and t crossed.

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Scouse123 said:

 I agree,

 

But for the sake of fairness and transparency I would, if I were in charge, return him to Australia and let them in his country of origin and the Americans sort it out.

 

He faces life imprisonment in the States, if convicted on the very serious charges he is facing and he is a very high profile figure. We will have all kinds of Human rights organizations vilifying Britain if these matters are not followed very carefully with every i dotted and t crossed.

Once the UK has received an extradition request, the UK must under the extradition treaty process the request, court challenges included.

 

Shipping Assange off to Australia is not an option. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Scouse123 said:

]

Apparently,

 

The Ecuadorians found him to be ungrateful, obnoxious, demanding, untidy and uncooperative with their Embassy officials and a complete pain in the backside.

 

They were glad to see the back of him and had tried for years to get him to leave realizing they had opened a can of worms.

 

All that said, the Australian government are the ones who should be assisting him with his legal rights and objections to the extradition request by the US.

The Australian government can provide advice on his rights, he has lawyers assisting him with any legal objections he may wish to raise regarding his extradition.

 

The courts will decide and ultimately the Home Secretary will sign or not sign the final approval to extradite.

 

Delaying this might work against Assange, since if what is alleged is true he might at least hope for a pardon from Trump, a possibility soon to evaporate.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, olfu said:

I laugh when see claims about UK being a democracy and Assange case is typical example.

UKs claim to democracy is indeed a joke but Assange alone is responsible for his current predicament and the millions it has cost the taxpayer to date.

  • Like 2
  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Chomper Higgot said:

He was not dragged from any embassy, he was evicted and the UK police answered a legitimate request to assist in his eviction.

Wasn't he? His feet aren't even touching the ground! And if I recall correctly, the embassy staff broke normal protocol by inviting the police in to remove him as he refused to leave of his own accord.

 

But agreed, he was evicted for being, amongst many other things, a proverbial pain in the backside.

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...