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Thousands rush to climb Australia's Uluru ahead of ban

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Thousands rush to climb Australia's Uluru ahead of ban

 

2019-10-09T092210Z_1_LYNXMPEF980OU_RTROPTP_3_AUSTRALIA-ULURU.JPG

FILE PHOTO: Tourists crowd a trail as they attempt to climb the Uluru, a large sandstone rock formation at Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, Northern Territory, Australia September 25, 2019 in this image obtained from social media. Koki via REUTERS

 

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Thousands of people are rushing to climb Australia's Uluru, ignoring the calls of indigenous people to stay off what they consider a sacred monolith, before the ascent is permanently banned at the end of the month.

 

Visitors will no longer be able to scale the Australian landmark, formerly known as Ayers Rock, from Oct. 26, following a decades-long campaign by indigenous communities to protect it.

 

The UNESCO World Heritage-listed 348-metre (1,142-ft) rock, famed for its deep red-ochre hues, is a top tourist draw despite its remote desert location near Alice Springs in the Northern Territory.

 

The upcoming ban has drawn a throng of visitors and it is the busiest it has been in more than a decade, Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park manager Mike Misso told broadcaster SBS News.

 

"We know it's certainly in the hundreds and probably nearer 1,000," Misso said, referring to daily arrivals.

 

"There's definitely a lot of people wanting to climb, but actually our same message that we've had for a number of years is Parks Australia and traditional owners requesting that people choose not to climb," he added, referring to the federal agency which helps manage national parks.

 

Most visitors do not climb Uluru.

 

The Anangu people, the traditional owners of Uluru, have called for the climb to be closed since 1985, when the park was placed in indigenous hands, due to its spiritual significance as a route their ancestors took.

 

Safety and environmental concerns are also cited as reasons not to attempt the climb, the park says.

 

To commemorate the climbing ban, the park will conduct a public celebration on Oct. 27, 34 years after Uluru was handed back to its traditional owners.

 

Australians are still the most common visitors to climb the rock, followed by the Japanese, according to Parks Australia.

 

(Reporting by Paulina Duran in Sydney; Editing by Karishma Singh)

 

 

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-- © Copyright Reuters 2019-10-24
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1 hour ago, sirineou said:

Do they have a way to drive up? from the back maybe?

We went to the temple near Udomrat dam in Khon kaen  and I climbed all the steps to the top.

 image.thumb.png.e9a0038ea3b859a75b7c29da4ccce923.png

only to find a bunch of cars parked behind it. Grrrrrr. Coming down was a breeze :smile:.

It would suck to climb that big ass rock  only to find a parking lot and a food truck there. 

 

1 hour ago, sirineou said:

Do they have a way to drive up? from the back maybe?

We went to the temple near Udomrat dam in Khon kaen  and I climbed all the steps to the top.

 image.thumb.png.e9a0038ea3b859a75b7c29da4ccce923.png

only to find a bunch of cars parked behind it. Grrrrrr. Coming down was a breeze :smile:.

It would suck to climb that big ass rock  only to find a parking lot and a food truck there. 

No way to drive up, big <deleted> rock, no cable cars or such.

 

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1 hour ago, Chazar said:

Its  a lump of rock  nothing  more, what people  "believe" is  just nonsense,like all religions and origin stories providing no evidence for their lack of understanding.

Hope the same rule (thought) applies to cathedrals, churches synagogues, wailing wall etc.

 

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1 hour ago, Chazar said:

Its  a lump of rock  nothing  more, what people  "believe" is  just nonsense,like all religions and origin stories providing no evidence for their lack of understanding.

Indeed. 

 

It's a laugh really, as many ( ?most ) people now in the west, including Australia, do not believe in "God" anyway, but think that a rock is sacred. Wish they'd make up their mind. A rock can only be sacred if people believe in "God".

 

 

 
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7 minutes ago, steven100 said:

Ayers rock is a good tourist attraction and it draws in thousands of dollars to the local community in Alice Springs and Kings Canyon.

Sadly, because a few local aborigines think it's sacred they are banning future climbing and as such hundreds of jobs will go including bus drivers, tour operators, guides, restaurant staff and many others.

Maybe the government should re-evaluate their welfare system as it could also be considered sacred and therefore blocked …..  

Because it’s all about the Dollar.

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8 hours ago, Chazar said:

Its  a lump of rock  nothing  more, what people  "believe" is  just nonsense,like all religions and origin stories providing no evidence for their lack of understanding.

Yes it's just a rock but if this one is sacred for the abo's then we should respect that. I've driven all around that area and there are many more of those same huge rocks...why don't they go there to climb it?

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1 hour ago, RJRS1301 said:

Hope the same rule (thought) applies to cathedrals, churches synagogues, wailing wall etc.

 

yes anyone can go into them

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2 minutes ago, Thian said:

Yes it's just a rock but if this one is sacred for the abo's then we should respect that. I've driven all around that area and there are many more of those same huge rocks...why don't they go there to climb it?

Its  crazy all sorts  of groups "claim" this  that and the other

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10 minutes ago, thaibeachlovers said:

It's just a big rock. God didn't make it heal people or perform miracles. 

I acknowledge it looks spectacular and people want to look at it, but I don't see why a few people should be able to deny everyone else the right to enjoy the view from the top. Most primitive people didn't even have the concept of property rights. That was the invention of Europeans that "gave" them the property rights to something that belongs to everyone, IMO.

and without that science to explain the rock  many would  still be worshipping it.

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