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Elzear

How to live with Isaan wife in respect of culture

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37 minutes ago, puchooay said:

Mistakes in thinking and talking already. Drop the words "Issan" and "Farang" when talking about husbands and wives. She is your wife. Simple. You are her husband. Simple too. To use words referring to nationality is, in my opinion, creating a stumbling block already.

 

Learn the language. Don't worry about the bar stool brigade that tell you Thai is useless in Issan as it is not. Kids speak it in school and Mum, Dad, Granny and Grandad listen to it on TV. You will get by easily with Thai.

 

Also disagree with asking your wife to sort all the problems. Fine to run it past her first to make sure you are not out of order but try to show that you are happy to communicate with the family and to sort problems out yourself. Respect works both ways.

 

I have seen and heard of so many expats who thought they were the dog's Bo%$#cks. Coming out with things like " I pay for everything so they have to do things my way". Even one guy saying " I built a wall around the house with a locking gate. If mother in law wants to speak she can ring the bell and my wife will meet her at the gate." If that is the way one thinks then time to turn around and go back to where you came from. It is a marriage the same as anywhere and should be treated that way. Regardless of back ground and financial standing you are now equal partners in a union. 

 Show them that you feel this way. If, and I only say "if" as there have been cases when things aren't what they seem, they are good people they will return that trust and respect.

 

This is the model that I followed and still follow. 21 years and still going strong.

 

Good luck.

One aspect of married life that puzzles me is that of giving a salary to the wife ? How can that be and if applicable, if a must, how is this monthly amount decided ? 

 

39 minutes ago, puchooay said:

Mistakes in thinking and talking already. Drop the words "Issan" and "Farang" when talking about husbands and wives. She is your wife. Simple. You are her husband. Simple too. To use words referring to nationality is, in my opinion, creating a stumbling block already.

 

Learn the language. Don't worry about the bar stool brigade that tell you Thai is useless in Issan as it is not. Kids speak it in school and Mum, Dad, Granny and Grandad listen to it on TV. You will get by easily with Thai.

 

Also disagree with asking your wife to sort all the problems. Fine to run it past her first to make sure you are not out of order but try to show that you are happy to communicate with the family and to sort problems out yourself. Respect works both ways.

 

I have seen and heard of so many expats who thought they were the dog's Bo%$#cks. Coming out with things like " I pay for everything so they have to do things my way". Even one guy saying " I built a wall around the house with a locking gate. If mother in law wants to speak she can ring the bell and my wife will meet her at the gate." If that is the way one thinks then time to turn around and go back to where you came from. It is a marriage the same as anywhere and should be treated that way. Regardless of back ground and financial standing you are now equal partners in a union. 

 Show them that you feel this way. If, and I only say "if" as there have been cases when things aren't what they seem, they are good people they will return that trust and respect.

 

This is the model that I followed and still follow. 21 years and still going strong.

 

Good luck.

 

40 minutes ago, carlyai said:

Marriage is very difficult. Even when you both are from the same country and speak the same language.

 

It's especially difficult marrying cross-culture.

 

You're never going to understand everything, or maybe half of what goes on.

 

I'd say try and live together for a few years first before you decide that this life and this person is the one.

 

Be careful of your money and don't spend too much...keep most for a rainy day and if you have a house or property in another country don't sell it.

 

My wife and I have been together about 25 years and travelled and worked together on most of my projects. Presently retired an living in Isaan for the last 6 odd years. It's all good. emoji3.png

 

Sent from my SM-J700F using Tapatalk

 

 

Edit

woooppss 35 years married.

 

Do you give your wife a ... monthly salary ? Please I am serious. It is what I read on some article about local culture (whether a Thai or Isaan custom, I do not know)

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5 minutes ago, Elzear said:

One aspect of married life that puzzles me is that of giving a salary to the wife ? How can that be and if applicable, if a must, how is this monthly amount decided ? 

for the majority of them, we are mobile ATM's..... you are hiring somebody to live with you, thus the salary request, you will be providing for the family, including your wife and yet still have to give the salary, I can't figure it out but maybe others can, giving a salary (for me) means no love involved but mostly a business transaction, thus (for me) prefer to hire (pay) for many different ones when necessary, but that's my opinion

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God seems very sad.

You are coming on here now asking these questions?

Good luck dude.  Just, good luck......

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1 hour ago, puchooay said:

Mistakes in thinking and talking already. Drop the words "Issan" and "Farang" when talking about husbands and wives. She is your wife. Simple. You are her husband. Simple too. To use words referring to nationality is, in my opinion, creating a stumbling block already.

 

Learn the language. Don't worry about the bar stool brigade that tell you Thai is useless in Issan as it is not. Kids speak it in school and Mum, Dad, Granny and Grandad listen to it on TV. You will get by easily with Thai.

 

Also disagree with asking your wife to sort all the problems. Fine to run it past her first to make sure you are not out of order but try to show that you are happy to communicate with the family and to sort problems out yourself. Respect works both ways.

 

I have seen and heard of so many expats who thought they were the dog's Bo%$#cks. Coming out with things like " I pay for everything so they have to do things my way". Even one guy saying " I built a wall around the house with a locking gate. If mother in law wants to speak she can ring the bell and my wife will meet her at the gate." If that is the way one thinks then time to turn around and go back to where you came from. It is a marriage the same as anywhere and should be treated that way. Regardless of back ground and financial standing you are now equal partners in a union. 

 Show them that you feel this way. If, and I only say "if" as there have been cases when things aren't what they seem, they are good people they will return that trust and respect.

 

This is the model that I followed and still follow. 21 years and still going strong.

 

Good luck.

 I add the following:

- Yes people do analyse things / structure their thinking and their strategies differently in different countries / societies. Don't try too hard to understand everything.

 

- Don't take the stance that your way is better, not always necessarily true, and that approach is never going to work.

 

- Give due respect to her parents, give them drinks, snacks etc., without them asking.

 

- Don't overreact and always compromise a little, it's not that difficult. 

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35 minutes ago, CGW said:

Harsh! but a lot of truth in what you say, I have next to nothing to do with my wife's family, we live a couple of hours drive away from them, I made it clear from the beginning I didn't want any of them living with us or just dropping in, worked well, we have been together 16 years now.

In all honesty I don't know either of the in-laws first names, keep thinking I should know, the reality is not that interested!

Most of the disaster stories start where people move into the wife's village and build on family land - forget that idea IMO.

Don't get me wrong, I like my wife's family, They are always friendly and welcoming to me, and of course, in 22 years, we have moved on a generation or so from the early years, so I am now dealing with the kids of her siblings kids, so I am the farang Uncle who has always been around.   I guess that it has now become 'comfortable' for everyone , as the rules of the relationship were set very early on and are now well established.  It also helped when our mixed race daughter (now 21 years old) was born, as she is effectively also a farang, although duel Nationality and tri=lingual.  It made me less 'foreign' to everyone. 

Edited by Pilotman
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24 minutes ago, CGW said:

Harsh! but a lot of truth in what you say, I have next to nothing to do with my wife's family, we live a couple of hours drive away from them, I made it clear from the beginning I didn't want any of them living with us or just dropping in, worked well, we have been together 16 years now.

In all honesty I don't know either of the in-laws first names, keep thinking I should know, the reality is not that interested!

Most of the disaster stories start where people move into the wife's village and build on family land - forget that idea IMO.

That’s okay, they don’t know your name either.  They just call you the farang.  They do know a lot about your finances however.  How much your car cost, how much you spend on beer, what you have in the bank ....anything your wife knows.

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2 hours ago, Elzear said:

please tell me of your experiences and above all your advices.

That would be a book, my good man. However, One thing´s for sure. Your in for a hell of a bumpy ride! 😆

 

Don´t worry, though! There is a solution. Just don´t take anything too serious, and never create more expenses than you are willing to loose.

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2 hours ago, EVENKEEL said:

I only advise is to leave money in your budget for an escape. Not to be a gloomy gus, but some guys do go overboard in their golden years and over extend themselves.  And, And I highly recommend you have your very own personnel transportation, I mean keys on you at all times, it belongs to you in name as well. I've never needed it, but have always had it.

This is the best advice I come across here . No wonder your username is "EVENKEEL"-   so you don't flip over - bottom up.

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