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Jingthing

Study shows Thailand ranks only 60th in Global LGBT Acceptance

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A global rank of 60 isn't great but it isn't horrible either.

The top rank was Iceland and the lowest was Tajikistan (174th).

I said ONLY 60th because I think most people would guess the ranking for Thailand would be higher. You know, the usual, but look at all the ladyboys kind of superficial observation. 

This is from an institute that has been studying this topic since the 1980's. It's not based on a quickie poll but on extensive research.

 

The link:

https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/GAI-Update-Oct-2019.pdf

Edited by Jingthing

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Just now, CNXexpat said:

I saw ladyboys, girls with tomboys as friend and gay men working everywhere, including the immigration office in Chiang Mai, fully respected from everybody. I can´t believe this ranking. 

Yes, like I said I think most people will be surprised at how low it is. But Thailand was evaluated based on that institute's process like all the other countries and the highest and lowest rated countries certainly are not surprising at all. The full chart as well as trends over time is in the link. Scroll down for it. 

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Just out of interest , and without reading all the link ,nearly all the graphs show a peak at years 1992, 2003 and 2005 .

What happened at these times to create those peaks ??

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You have to be kidding...transgender gainfully employed everywhere...TV shows glorifying Transgender people and lifestyle...

 

What other country in the world are transgender people so visible and accepted?  

 

Thailand No 1 !   👍

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The acceptance (or is it tolerance?) (there is a big difference) of transgender people does not necessarily equate to LGBT rights, acceptance across a number of social domains, such as  employment, housing, law, equality, discrimination .

We should remember that being a transgender female or male does not necessarily mean the person self identifies as being transgender.

Gender and sexual orientation are both complex psychological and social matters 

 

Thanks for posting the link

 

 

 

Edited by RJRS1301
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many thai parents will kick out their children when they say they are gay

 

you know, not getting the expected sin sod and others

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That's rigorous research. Thanks for posting the link. 

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I have a few comments at this point.

I haven't read the entire report but I plan to read more of it to understand their process. 

I think people are focusing too much on the superficial on this issue. 

They don't really know how the Thais actually feel, LGBT and others.

They might not show homophobia in overt ways very much such as in many other cultures but that doesn't mean it isn't there.

The focus on transgender people is only one part of this too,.

Transgender women in Thai society seem to feel pressured limit themselves to a very narrow number of professions, some of them illegal. That indicates that there is more to the story than mere numbers and visibility.

Also I think a real clue is RELIGION.

I recall another survey saying that Thailand is the most religious country in the world. Mostly Buddhist of course.

Now what do Thai Buddhists believe about gay people? I don't know exactly because I'm not Thai or a Buddhist but I have heard that they believe that similar to traditional feelings about handicapped people that it's a PUNISHMENT for being bad in previous lives.

If that's true (others can comment on that) let that sink in on what Thais actually think about LGBT people. 

 

Cheers

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Few of us, I suspect, will be surprised to learn that the least LGBT-tolerant nations are those where an Islamic ideology prevails.

 

What arguably IS surprising is the continuing willingness of Western societies to throw down the welcome mat for millions of immigrants with views on human sexuality and numerous other important issues inimical to our own.

 

One of Theresa May's last acts as UK Prime Minister was surreptitiously to sign the British people up to the UN's Migration Pact. (And no, she didn't offer us a referendum before putting pen to paper). Other EU leaders followed suit.

 

The results of this collective folly will eventually speak for themselves - most likely via wailing loudspeakers mounted on minarets.

 

Demographics indicate that a number white indigenous populations across Europe could eventually end up minorities in their own backyards before the turn of the century. This is already the case in London and several other UK towns and cities, where Muslim activists are calling for the introduction of Sharia law.

 

One can't help but wonder what the international "tolerance league table" will look like in 2119!

Edited by Krataiboy
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I once spoke with a manager in Thailand about this. He was the GM of a big hotel in Bangkok before he had a sex reassignment surgery.

According to her LGBT Acceptance in Thailand is high for many people and in many jobs. But the acceptance in top jobs is not high.

And when I think about the higher managers who I met until now in Thailand I can confirm what she said.

There are lots of LGBT people in "normal" jobs. But very few in top jobs.

 

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Define "top jobs". Managing people, high pay, or promoted by others?

 

I personally know several (cannot be counted on 1 hand) openly gay, trans, lesbian, and tomboy doctors working in private and public hospitals. Some specialized, some with a PhD of a top american university. As far as i know they are well-respected by the people around them, including patients. But possibly the medical sector is a bit different and more understanding.

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