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Study shows Thailand ranks only 60th in Global LGBT Acceptance

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Probably because there're now far too many letters to try to work out their gender.

 

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47 minutes ago, jesimps said:

Probably because there're now far too many letters to try to work out their gender.

 

Only one of the letters in the study is about gender identity. 

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When my b/f (40 yrs younger than me) and I got 'hitched' in a Khmer village ceremony here in Surin in 2013, I inquired - as things were being organized - whether a monk would be officiating. I was told No, monks are for death not marriage. I then inquired what Buddhism had to say on the matter. The village response was a collective shrug of the shoulders (which I took to mean Who cares?) but was also told that the Buddhist view is that "Marriage is for two people who love each other" without further distinction.

 

Since then we encounter gay men & women frequently here in rural Thailand, but mostly in 'middle class' occupations (notably doctors - a similar high proportion as in The West, & travellers passing thru by car & stopping to eat ... ). As in other countries (eg Oz) the gay rural teenagers mostly leave for the cities and don't or seldom return.

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 Thailand, theoretically, should be amongst the first 5 spots. But this is a deeply hypocritical society. They pretend accepting something while deep inside they don't. Same can be applied to how they think about Farangs. The fact that they don't openly confront us does not mean they accept us. 

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37 minutes ago, Zikomat said:

 Thailand, theoretically, should be amongst the first 5 spots. But this is a deeply hypocritical society. They pretend accepting something while deep inside they don't. Same can be applied to ho8w they think about Farangs. The fact that they don't openly confront us does not mean they accept us. 

I wouldn't put it quite like that but you're getting close to what I was talking about before. That this goes deeper than superficial appearances. 

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Part of my job was to hire and fire employees.   Gay employees were always a contentious issue.   At one point I was told to not hire anyone who was gay.   At another time, I was told to fire those who were gay.  

 

I did ask about how I was to ascertain whether or not they were gay?   It wasn't a part of the interview process and generally people didn't talk about their sexual preferences just didn't come up.  

 

I was told to start with those who 'acted' gay, so I took one of the most exceptional employees and said that maybe we should get rid of him because he 'acted' gay.   I was told that person would be too hard to replace!   Another person I brought up was related to the owner, so that was a 'no-go' as well.  

 

I never did fire anyone for being gay, but they were occasionally told to 'butch it up' when the owner was around.  

 

The point is that they had zero protection from being arbitrarily fired simply for being perceived as being gay.  

 

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This "study" is, most likely, a post graduate thesis. Odds are that the authors have never experienced most of the cultures examined.

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7 minutes ago, Curt1591 said:

This "study" is, most likely, a post graduate thesis. Odds are that the authors have never experienced most of the cultures examined.

Two things. 

Their process is explained in the report. 

No. It's most certainly not a graduate thesis. 

It's the product of a think tank that as you can read has been exploring these issues using their process for decades. 

 

https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/mission/

 

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53 minutes ago, Jingthing said:

Two things. 

Their process is explained in the report. 

No. It's most certainly not a graduate thesis. 

It's the product of a think tank that as you can read has been exploring these issues using their process for decades. 

 

https://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/mission/

 

Who do you think the "institute's" "experts" are? 

 

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On 10/29/2019 at 10:30 PM, CNXexpat said:

I saw ladyboys, girls with tomboys as friend and gay men working everywhere, including the immigration office in Chiang Mai, fully respected from everybody. I can´t believe this ranking. 

I can believe the ranking.

 

Ladyboys are "accepted" in Thailand but only amongst certain part of the Thai population (lower parts).

 

You will NEVER see one in a proper corporate setting, and the Thai Chinese that dominate business in Thailand have very low acceptance of transgender, gay, lesbian, etc.

 

Also, I would say Thais are generally not accepting so much as they are apathetic - they just don't care as long as it doesn't affect them.

 

You will not see them incorporating ladyboys or gays or lesbians into society proper.

 

Edited by Fex Bluse
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2 hours ago, Curt1591 said:

Who do you think the "institute's" "experts" are? 

 

See the link. 

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2 hours ago, Fex Bluse said:

I can believe the ranking.

 

Ladyboys are "accepted" in Thailand but only amongst certain part of the Thai population (lower parts).

 

You will NEVER see one in a proper corporate setting, and the Thai Chinese that dominate business in Thailand have very low acceptance of transgender, gay, lesbian, etc.

 

Also, I would say Thais are generally not accepting so much as they are apathetic - they just don't care as long as it doesn't affect them.

 

You will not see them incorporating ladyboys or gays or lesbians into society proper.

 

In any case I think it's clear by now there are reasons that it wouldn't be in the very top tier like 10th or 20th. 

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33 minutes ago, Jingthing said:

See the link. 

•    Legal Scholars
•    Economists
•    Demographers
•    Social Scientists
•   Public Health Experts

All clear now! 

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5 hours ago, Scott said:

Part of my job was to hire and fire employees.   Gay employees were always a contentious issue.   At one point I was told to not hire anyone who was gay.   At another time, I was told to fire those who were gay.  

 

I did ask about how I was to ascertain whether or not they were gay?   It wasn't a part of the interview process and generally people didn't talk about their sexual preferences just didn't come up.  

 

I was told to start with those who 'acted' gay, so I took one of the most exceptional employees and said that maybe we should get rid of him because he 'acted' gay.   I was told that person would be too hard to replace!   Another person I brought up was related to the owner, so that was a 'no-go' as well.  

 

I never did fire anyone for being gay, but they were occasionally told to 'butch it up' when the owner was around.  

 

The point is that they had zero protection from being arbitrarily fired simply for being perceived as being gay.  

 

Was this before anti discrimination laws?

Which country/

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1 minute ago, RJRS1301 said:

Was this before anti discrimination laws?

Which country/

That was Thailand and started in 1997 and was still and issue up to the present.  

 

 

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